The race thickens

State Sen. Michael Merrifield, who pushed for dramatic cuts in testing, considers gubernatorial run

PHOTO: Nicholas Garcia
State Sen. Michael Merrifield, center, at a committee hearing on the nation's new education laws on Dec. 13.

A second Colorado lawmaker with deep ties to public education is considering a run for the governor’s mansion in 2018.

State Sen. Michael Merrifield of Colorado Springs confirmed to Chalkbeat he is weighing joining what could a crowded Democratic primary as a voice for the party’s progressive wing.

One of Merrifield’s Democratic colleagues from the Senate Education Committee is also considering a run — outgoing Sen. Michael Johnston, the standard bearer for the state’s education reform movement. The two lawmakers often clashed on policies such as linking teacher evaluations to student academic growth.

Others who have been mentioned as potential Democratic candidates include former U.S. Sen. and Secretary of the Interior Ken Salazar, U.S. Rep. Ed Perlmutter and former state treasurer Cary Kennedy.

Merrifield, a former music teacher who has served on both the House and Senate education committees, said he’s been encouraged to run by Democrats across the state after November’s election.

“I think the state party has been far too Denver-centric for a number of years,” he said, suggesting the state’s Democrats have abandoned rural parts of the state and labor organizations. “I think Democrats need to get back to their roots.”

Merrifield, 69, said he believes he can rally the growing progressive wing of the Democratic Party in Colorado that supported U.S. Sen. Bernie Sanders during the presidential primaries. Sanders won the Colorado presidential caucus.

“Many of those names being bandied about will have difficulty arousing excitement from the base,” he said. “And that’s one thing that I’ve always been able to do in all of my races: get support from unions, and teachers, and mom and pop business owners.”

Merrifield is considered among the most liberal of Democrat lawmakers in the General Assembly. But his Senate district is split almost evenly among Democrats, Republicans and unaffiliated voters.

On education issues, Merrifield has staunchly opposed numerous education reform efforts and has proposed bills to slash the amount of standardized testing in schools.

What would a Merrifield governorship mean for the state’s public schools?

“It’d be a wonderful thing for public education, with a capital P-U-B-L-I-C education,” he said. “It’d not be a very good thing for those who want to privatize, corporatize, ‘voucherize’ and ‘charterize’ public education.”

Merrifield said he didn’t know when he’d make a decision. Among the factors he’s raising is whether he can raise the kind of money needed to mount a statewide campaign.

“It would be a huge undertaking,” Merrifield said. “I think so far, what I’m seeing is a path. Not a well-beaten path, but a path through the forest.”

ColoradoPolitics.com first reported Merrifield’s potential gubernatorial run.

taking a stand

Colorado education leaders sign petition asking Washington officials to protect undocumented youth

PHOTO: J. Zubrzycki
DPS superintendent Tom Boasberg reads with a student at an event called Power Lunch.

Superintendents from Colorado’s two largest school districts have signed a petition asking President Trump and Congress to extend temporary protections for young undocumented immigrants — some of them teachers.

Denver’s Tom Boasberg and Jefferson County’s Dan McMinimee joined more than 1,000 educators from across the country in signing the petition drafted by the nonprofit education advocacy group Stand for Children.

The petition asks that officials keep alive former President Obama’s Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program and help pass the DREAM Act.

The DREAM Act, first introduced in Congress in 2001, would create a path to citizenship for undocumented immigrants who were brought to the United States as children.

The petition reads in part:

Out of concern for children and the strength of our nation, we respectfully call on officials at the highest levels of power to address this issue in an urgent way. Students must be able to attend school and graduate with a clear path toward a productive future, and teachers who were brought here as children must be able to continue to strengthen our schools and our nation.

Many in the education community raised concern after Trump was elected in November. Trump ran on a promise to deport millions of undocumented immigrants and end Obama’s deferment program. On Thursday, some of Colorado’s Latino lawmakers sent a letter to Trump asking him to back away from that promise.

Other education leaders in Colorado who signed the petition:

  • Savinay Chandrasekhar, executive director of Minds Matter of Denver, which provides tutoring and other support for low-income youth.
  • Kimberlee Sia, executive director of KIPP Colorado Schools, part of a national charter school network.
  • Lauren Trent, director of education partnerships of CareerWise Colorado, which is developing an apprenticeship program for Colorado youth set to debut this fall.
  • Michael Clough, superintendent of Sheridan School District, southwest of Denver.
  • Patricia Hanrahan, deputy superintendent of Englewood Schools.

Numerous Denver Public Schools teachers also signed the petition.

petition drive

School chiefs in Memphis, Nashville join education leaders urging protection of ‘Dreamers’ under Trump

The superintendents of Tennessee’s two largest school districts are among 1,500 education leaders to sign a petition asking for continued protection from deportation for “Dreamers,” young people brought to the U.S. as children.

Dorsey Hopson

Dorsey Hopson of Shelby County Schools and Shawn Joseph of Metropolitan Nashville Public Schools are among chiefs of at least 15 urban districts to sign the letter. Also joining the campaign are at least 30 educators from mostly Memphis and Nashville, as well as leaders from charter and nonprofit organizations and teacher’s unions from across the nation.

The petition was released this week before Donald Trump’s inauguration on Friday as the nation’s 45th president. During his presidential campaign, Trump vowed to do away with the federal policy known as Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals Policy, or DACA, as part of a crackdown on illegal immigration. However, he recently told Time magazine that he would “work something out” for people known as “Dreamers,” so named for the failed DREAM Act legislation that would provide a path toward citizenship.

The petition calls DACA “crucially important to public education across the country” and also urges passage of the DREAM Act. The drive was organized by Stand for Children, a nonprofit group that advocates for education equity in 11 states, including Tennessee.

Cardell Orrin, director of Stand for Children in Memphis, said the signatures show that “leaders in Nashville and Memphis care about what’s happening with our kids and want to see the dream continue for Dreamers.”

He added that school leaders are mobilized to work together in behalf of students if Trump attempts to do away with DACA.

“There may not be as many undocumented students here as in some of the others states (such as) Texas or Arizona. But this could still have great impact on kids in Tennessee,” Orrin said.

Among other Tennesseans signing the petition as of Friday were:

  • Marcus Robinson chief executive officer, Memphis Education Fund
  • Maya Bugg, chief executive officer, Tennessee Charter School Center
  • Brian Gilson, chief people officer, Achievement Schools, Memphis
  • Sonji Branch, affiliate director, Communities in Schools of Tennessee
  • Sylvia Flowers, executive director of educator talent, Tennessee Department of Education
  • Ginnae Harley, federal programs director, Knox County Schools

Read what Trump’s inauguration means for one undocumented Nashville student-turned-teacher.