Headlines

Week in review: “Horrible outcomes” vs. “false news”

 

Today’s the day that struggling schools across the state have been dreading for months. At 11 a.m., the state education department plans to release its annual top-to-bottom school ranking, which the state school reform office will use to decide which schools could be shuttered for poor performance.

The difficult news, which is likely to be drowned out by coverage of Donald Trump’s inauguration, caps a busy week that included Gov. Rick Snyder’s State of the State address and the Senate nomination hearing for Betsy DeVos. Detroit schools took a bit of a beating during the DeVos hearing as Democrats tied Trump’s chosen education secretary to “horrible” outcomes in Detroit schools. DeVos pushed back saying “a lot has gone right” in Detroit schools. She knocked claims that poor results are related to lax charter school oversight as “false news.”

“I think it is important to put Detroit in context. In 1950, there were 1.8 million people living in the city of Detroit. Today there is less than 700,000 … Anyone with any means in the city of Detroit has basically left the city.”

— Betsy DeVos, nominee for U.S. Secretary of Education

Read on for more on the hearing, the State of the State address and the rest of the week’s headlines. Also stay tuned for next week, when we’ll have some exciting news of our own.

The hearing

The DeVos hearing was marked by sharp partisan division as Democrats griped that they weren’t given enough time to question someone they deemed unqualified for the nation’s top education job. But DeVos made it clear in more than three hours of testimony that more time would not likely have produced more insight. She offered few policy specifics beyond reiterating her support for giving parents control over education. Here’s what we learned (and what we didn’t) during the hearing. (Our roundup was co-published this week by FiveThirtyEight).

For Detroiters, the most interesting exchange came between DeVos and Colorado Sen. Michael Bennet, a former Denver Public Schools superintendent who says his city does a much better job of holding charter schools accountable than Detroit does.

Bennet says he supports charter schools — but only if they work. “There’s no practical difference between being forced to attend a terrible school and being given a chance to attend the choice of five terrible schools,” he said.

There’s a lot of ideology on both sides of the DeVos/Detroit debate. Here’s some facts to help sort it out.

A Senate committee is planning to vote on DeVos on Tuesday but, whether or not she gets the job, these crucial education issues will largely be decided by the states.

If you missed the hearing, here’s a transcript. (Search for the word ‘Detroit’)

State of the State

Education was not a major topic during Snyder’s seventh State of the State address but the Detroit News speculated that he might be holding out for an imminent report from an education commission he appointed last year. “Hopefully it will contain meaningful suggestions,” the paper wrote.

During the speech, Snyder made no reference to the looming school closings that are expected from his office today.

The Free Press noted that the speech had many notable omissions. Among them: There was no mention of school funding or of the report last year that found many school districts don’t get enough money from the state.

Snyder did mention the new Detroit school board, which he encouraged to be “laser-focused on the kids learning with an emphasis on prudent financial management.”

He also announced a push to improve computer science education to prepare kids for high-tech jobs. “Think about your schools in your area and think about what they’re teaching,” he said. “We have a huge gap. We need to close that gap. And so I look forward to creating a work group to work with the legislature and the superintendent on coming up with great ideas about how to encourage more of this. And you’re going to find us willing to make investments.”

In other news

  • News of dreaded school closings is expected today — two days after teachers at one troubled high school rallied to keep their school open.
  • Today will be the last time the state releases its top-to-bottom school ranking. Schools will soon be judged instead by an A to F letter grade system.
  • The city of Detroit has joined the federal lawsuit that claims the state of the city’s schools violates children’s constitutional rights.
  • A lawsuit over Detroit school janitors could cost taxpayers $31 million.
  • A parent leader has this message for Detroit’s new school board.
  • On MLK Day, a Detroit high school created an exhibit to document racial prejudice and violence.
  • A historic Detroit high school has been repeatedly vandalized since it closed in 2012.
  • A Detroit charter school has locked down its Corktown building.
  • Public school supporters rallied in cities around the country as part of a nationwide demonstration.
  • A troubled suburban district is seeking community input on plans to overhaul academics.
  • A state Republican lawmaker makes a case for transferring state and federal education dollars into parent-controlled Education Savings Accounts.
  • An education advocate notes that Trump’s plan to put more education decisions in the hands of states ramps up pressure on Michigan leaders to focus on equity and excellence in schools. She called on the state to rethink its approach to early literacy, school funding and accountability and other key priorities.
  • A teachers union leader says low pay and difficult teaching conditions are to blame for an acute substitute teacher shortage.
  • A Michigan teacher has come under fire for refusing to allow his students to watch Trump’s inauguration address during class.

Week In Review

Week in review: Controversy about superintendent opening and lawsuits against the state

PHOTO: Meghan Mangrum

Who will be the next superintendent of Detroit schools? The board of education did not grant Alycia Meriweather an interview, but many in Detroit are pushing the board to make her a candidate. Another wrinkle: One of the three finalists withdrew from the competition.

If you were not able to attend Chalkbeat’s kickoff event last Friday, be sure to watch our coverage. You can also view the show here.

Read on for more about Meriweather, mascots, and how school lunches affect test scores.

— Julie Topping, Editor, Chalkbeat Detroit

Interim chief rejected: Detroit schools superintendent Alycia Meriweather is trying to stay focused on the district’s future, like bringing struggling schools run by the state back into the district, but her departure creates another layer of uncertainty for parents and teachers.

Populist support: Meriweather’s exclusion from the search process has triggered angry reactions on social media. Hundreds of people have signed a petition urging the school board to reconsider. And on Wednesday, the union representing Detroit teachers called on the board to give her a shot.

And then there were two: One finalist withdrew, leaving two candidates vying to be Detroit schools superintendent. Both have ties to the area and bring experience from other low-performing districts.  

Opinion: Secretly discussing potential Detroit superintendent candidates and voting behind closed doors to tell 16 schools on the state’s priority list that their contracts may not be renewed was called a disservice to parents and students. One newspaper calls for better accountability and transparency.

Opinion: Another commentator believes Michigan doesn’t have the will to improve its underperforming schools.

Getting that diploma: The state’s graduation rate was down slightly for the class of 2016.  But fewer students are dropping out and instead are continuing school beyond four years.

Who gets the credit: East Detroit is no longer under the control of a state-appointed CEO. Local leaders object to state efforts to credit him with district improvements, which they say happened before he arrived.

Mascot fines: The state superintendent wants the power to fine school districts that refuse to change mascots and logos that are widely seen as offensive.

Lawsuit against the state: Educators, parent groups, and others interested in education sued to stop Michigan from giving $2.5 million to private schools to reimburse them for costs associated with state requirements.

Another lawsuit against the state: Detroit schools officially filed papers to keep the state from forcing the closure of failing schools.

Shuttle bumps: A school transportation system that some Detroit leaders had been exploring for this city faces challenges in Denver. The system won praise from U.S. Education Secretary Betsy DeVos.

Pushback: The state board of education spurned a recommendation from Gov. Rick Snyder’s education panel to disband the board, claiming it provides “transparency and continuous oversight” of school policy.  

Transformation: A nonprofit group hopes to transform a neighborhood by turning the former Durfee Elementary and Middle School into a community innovation center.

Eat to learn: One large study shows students at schools that serve lunches from healthier vendors get better test scores.

Harsh measures? A teacher’s aide at a Detroit school has been disciplined after a video appeared to show her throwing a student.

Week In Review

A lawsuit, our exciting event, and 9 other things you should know about Detroit schools this week

PHOTO: Gage Skidmore

Are they on or are they off? Michigan’s letter grades for schools were thrown into question this week as policy makers picked sides about how the state evaluates schools.

One thing that’s definitely on: the School Days storytelling event Chalkbeat is hosting tonight in collaboration with the Secret Society of Twisted Storytellers at the Charles H. Wright Museum. We’re expecting an epic night of cocktails and storytelling, designed to both celebrate and elevate the voices of Detroit residents. Tickets are $20 in advance (or $25 at the door). You can still buy tickets here.

Read on for more about accountability, teacher pay, and how Gov. Rick Snyder wants to improve schools.

— Julie Topping, Chalkbeat Detroit editor

School rankings: Changes in Detroit’s school ranking system hurt some of the city’s top schools but helped other lower ranked ones, including a charter school operated by the DeVos family.

Measuring accountability: Letter grades or not was the question this week as the state board of education and the governor split over how to measure school quality. The board wants to see a dashboard of assessments but the governor favors letter grades to evaluate schools. One blogger believes letter grade evaluations actually empower parents to make better decisions.

Non-closure agreements: The heads of most of the 38 schools targeted for closure are drafting agreements that would allow the schools to stay open while collaborating with the state. A template for the agreements is still being created.

A lawsuit anyway: Just to keep options open, the Detroit board of education followed other Michigan school districts and voted to sue the state reform office to prevent it from closing any of Detroit’s struggling schools.

School deserts: One podcast looks at the many difficulties Detroit parents face when trying to keep their children in a quality, stable, and accessible school. (Don’t forget our story about the sacrifices families make to attend strong schools.)

Governor’s strategy for schools: Snyder released his latest recommendations for improving state schools, including eliminating the state board of education, investing more in schools, expanding free preschool, and increasing parent partnerships. His panel believes these charges are necessary to keep Michigan students from falling further behind other states.

Federal budget: President Trump’s proposed budget adds $1.4 billion for school choice efforts, while cutting the overall budget of the education department by 13 percent, or $9 billion. Included in that cut would be funds for City Year in Detroit.

Teacher salaries: The average pay of teachers in the state went down this year, probably because of turnover. Find what Michigan teachers make in your district with this tool.

Graduation requirements: A three-member Senate panel will examine whether high school graduation curriculum guidelines in Michigan should be updated.

Returning to Detroit: New U.S. housing chief and Detroit native Ben Carson visited with students and parents at the Detroit school named for him during his national tour to share ideas about public housing.