Story booth

A teacher got this Detroit woman’s troublemaking brother involved in her classroom — and transformed both siblings’ lives

Parent advocate Bernita Bradley shares a story about a great teacher who helped he brother in a Detroit schools story booth.

Bernita Bradley was in the fourth grade when she came to recognize the power of great teaching.

Now a parent advocate and blogger who spends her days advocating for quality education in Detroit, Bradley said a great teacher became her “role model” when that teacher changed Bradley’s brother from a kid who was “hopping all over the place” in class to one who realized his own potential.

The boy had been the smart kid who was doing other students’ work, but not his own. That changed when the teacher asked him to stay after school to grade other students’ papers.

“I would watch my brother grade other students’ work and then he would get excited when he didn’t know it and come over to the teacher and ask the teacher ‘I don’t know this part.’ And she would work with him on it and then he’d go back and grade and it turned him into this student who sat in the classroom,” Bradley recalled.

That teacher, she said, “really became my first official role model as a teacher just to see that she changed my brother from being this person who was all over the place to being focused.”

Bradley shared this memory in a story booth set up outside the School Days storytelling event that was sponsored by Chalkbeat and the Secret Society of Twisted Storytellers last month at the Charles H. Wright Museum.

The event brought educators, parents and a student together to tell their stories on stage at the Wright but the event also invited other Detroiters to share their stories in a booth set up by Chalkbeat and the Skillman Foundation. (Skillman also supports Chalkbeat. Learn more about our funding here.)

If you have a story to tell — or know someone who does — please let us know.

Watch Bradley’s full story here:

Ask a teacher

What would Detroit teachers change about schools? Plenty! This video offers a glimpse

A new video called "Ideas from Educators" invites Detroit teachers to share suggestions for what they would change about education.

Ask a teacher how to improve education and you’ll get some interesting answers. Among them:

  • Change high school schedules so they’ll be more like college, with classes meeting a few times a week.
  • Get rid of grades.
  • Spend money educating parents as well as their kids.

Those were just some of the ideas Detroit filmmakers Colin Maloney and Dave Salazar heard when they interviewed Detroit-area teachers who work in district and charter schools.

The pair spoke with seven teachers, Maloney said, and included four in a short video called “Ideas From Educators.” The teachers in the video are William Weir from Schulze Elementary School; Molly Tannian from Starr Detroit Academy; Gerrard Allen from University Prep Science & Math, and Rhonda Jackson from Henderson Academy.

“I used to be a teacher down in New Orleans,” Maloney said. “In my experience, there is an abundance of discourse talking about teachers in Detroit and a relative dearth of discourse talking with them.”

Watch the full video here:

Story booth

A Detroit student speaks: ‘DPS has expanded my horizon for me to see a whole new world.’

KrisTia Maxwell is a student at Detroit's Marcus Garvey Academy

When KrisTia Maxwell started in the Detroit Public Schools as a 5-year-old kindergartener, she was nervous and shy and “didn’t know what was going to happen to me.”

Now, eight years later, she’s in middle school at Detroit’s Marcus Garvey Academy and says Detroit public schools (now called the Detroit Public Schools Community District) have helped make her the active, successful student she’s become.

“DPS has expanded my horizon for me to see a whole new world,” she said.

Her years at Marcus Garvey have included involvement in the National Junior Honor Society, the Girl Scouts, and the cheer team and basketball teams, among other activities.

The school “has improved me in all sorts of subjects and … given me opportunities to express myself and be who I am,” she said.

KrisTia told her Detroit schools story in a story booth outside the School Days storytelling event that was hosted in March by Chalkbeat and the Secret Society of Twisted Storytellers at the Charles H. Wright Museum.

The event brought educators, parents and students together to tell their stories on stage at the Wright but it also invited other Detroiters to share their stories in a booth set up by Chalkbeat and the Skillman Foundation. (Skillman also supports Chalkbeat. Learn more about our funding here.)

In her story, KrisTia said her school “is half of me. It’s an important part and I’m going to attempt to do whatever I can to accomplish getting my 4.0 GPA and just doing great and … making my mom proud.”

If you have a story to tell — or know someone who does — please let us know.

Watch KrisTia’s full story below:

KrisTia Maxwell from Chalkbeat on Vimeo.