Data dive

Like schools, fewer Indiana districts got As in 2016

PHOTO: Alan Petersime

School districts across the state saw fewer A grades in 2016 when the Indiana State Board of Education released the latest data today.

Although for individual schools, poor grades can bring consequences such as state intervention or takeover, for districts, there are no sanctions. Overall for 2016, 7.9 percent of Indiana districts received As, 60.5 percent received Bs, 29.4 received Cs, 1.73 percent received Ds and 0.35 percent received an F.

Cynthia Roach, director of testing and accountability for the state board, said officials expected grades to cluster in the middle of the scale — more Bs and Cs and fewer As and Fs. Those results are consistent with trends seen in individual school A-F grades and 2016 ISTEP scores, which dropped for the second straight year.

Last year, lawmakers voted to shield schools and districts from dramatically lower 2015 ISTEP scores, the result of a new more difficult test. As a result, 2015 grades were only changed from 2014 grades if they were better. That means 2016 is the first year that grades have been released showing the true impact of a more challenging test.

But generally, it’s tough to compare 2016 to 2015, and not just because of the more challenging 2015 ISTEP test and the resulting action by lawmakers. Indiana is also using a brand new model to calculate A-F school and district grades for 2016, in which test scores and test score improvement is weighted equally. Other non-test-based measures are also included in the new formula.  Previously, the most important factor was whether kids passed the test.

In Marion County, only Speedway Schools got an A grade from the state in 2016. Franklin and Perry townships got Bs, Indianapolis Public Schools got a D, and the rest of the county’s districts got Cs. No district received an F.

McCormick, at her first state board meeting today where she was elected board chairwoman, said testing is one of her priorities, and she’s hoping to examine both state tests and how the state measures schools as she moves forward with her administration.

“I know the field is frustrated,” McCormick said. “Obviously we have work to do in the assessment arena. We’re going to tackle that… We can’t have that conversation without talking about accountability in the same breath.”

Take Two

One year after TNReady collapse, Tennessee unveils plan to test online again

PHOTO: Tajuana Cheshier

After last year’s mostly failed transition to online testing, Tennessee will try again next year. And this time, state officials say they “feel confident” that the new online platform will work.

But unlike last year, the state will stagger the transition. All high schools will administer the test online in 2018. Middle and elementary schools will make the switch in 2019, though districts will have the option of administering the state’s test on paper to its youngest students.

Education Commissioner Candice McQueen announced the new game plan for TNReady testing on Thursday after sharing the timeline with superintendents the day before.

“Given the challenges we experienced last year, we took a step back this year and have worked very closely with our vendor, Questar, to create an online product that is right for Tennessee,” McQueen wrote to superintendents. “We are proud of the progress that has been made and feel confident in the strength of the Nextera platform.”

Many districts are expected to get a head start and use the option to administer the high school test this spring. McQueen reported that more than half of the state’s high schools participated in online practice tests last fall, and that feedback was “generally very positive.”

Districts have until Feb. 15 to decide whether to take this year’s test online, and testing will start on April 17.

McQueen has said repeatedly that Tennessee is committed to transitioning to online testing, even after its platform collapsed last year on the first day of testing. The test maker later acknowledged that its platform did not have enough servers for the volume of students online as most of the state tried to make the shift for all grades.

The commissioner reiterated the state’s commitment this week. “It is our responsibility to ensure Tennessee students are prepared to meet the demands of postsecondary and the workforce, and online readiness is a part of that effort,” she wrote. “… Online is the future for our students.”

However, McQueen said that the transition plan isn’t set in stone.

We will continue to look at proof points along the way to be sure we are setting up districts and schools for success using the online platform,” she wrote.

Last year’s failed online rollout was followed by the test maker’s inability to deliver printed test materials, prompting McQueen to cancel tests for grades 3-8 and fire North Carolina-based Measurement Inc.

This year’s test has several differences from 2016:

  • It was designed by Questar, a Minnesota-based testing company that Tennessee hired last July;
  • It will take place during a single testing window, in April 17 to May 5, rather than also having testing in February.
  • It will be slightly shorter, with shorter sections.

breaking

‘ILEARN’ test would replace ISTEP in 2019 under House GOP plan

PHOTO: Stephanie Snyder

A key Republican lawmaker is calling for Indiana’s next state test to be known as “ILEARN,” finally abolishing the hated ISTEP in time for the 2018-19 school year.

But the new test, should the plan move forward and become law, might not look that different to students and teachers.

Rep. Bob Behning, R-Indianapolis, filed House Bill 1003 in the Indiana General Assembly Wednesday setting out details for a new state testing system, whose name stands for “Indiana’s Learning Evaluation Assessment Readiness Network.” Behning championed the so-called “kill ISTEP” bill last spring, which came out of complaints about the test’s history of scoring glitches and delays.

Behning’s bill is the first to outline a plan to replace the test, and it still faces a number of legislative hurdles. But as House Education Committee chairman, Behning has considerable influence.

“ILEARN” would be similar to recommendations released late last year by a committee of lawmakers and educators charged with helping create a new test. That committee called for mostly tweaks to the ISTEP testing system, not an overhaul as some educators had favored.

His plan would include a few changes. In addition to continuing to test students in grades 3-8 and at least once in high school in math and English, the bill would require Indiana schools to give high school students a “nationally recognized” college or career readiness test. That test could be an exam for Advanced Placement or International Baccalaureate classes, a college entrance exam, or another test approved by the Indiana State Board of Education.

The bill would also have the state exams given in one testing period at the end of the year, rather than the current two periods in late winter and spring.

In order to graduate, the state would go back to requiring high school students to pass end-of-course assessments in English, Algebra I and science, not a 10th-grade test like what the state introduced in 2016.

Tests in social studies would also no longer be required.

The bill would also require that scores be returned to the Indiana State Board of Education by July 1 of the year the test was given. It also says the Indiana Department of Education would be able to make rules that encourage Indiana teachers to grade the writing questions.

Originally, Behning called for ISTEP to formally end after it was given in 2017, but because of the challenges of creating a new test in such a short time window, he and fellow Republicans in the Senate have said the current ISTEP needs to stick around for another year or so. His plan would have ILEARN given for the first time in 2019.

Below, find some of our top stories over the past year on the ever-changing exam, where we explain how Indiana got to this point. You can find all of Chalkbeat’s testing coverage here.