not good news

Klein says without state help, DOE could lay off 15,000 educators

Joel Klein testifying to State Senate today.
Joel Klein is asking for flexibility and more money from the state at a joint session of the legislature today. Watch the testimony live online by clicking ##http://assembly.state.ny.us/av/##here##.

Fleshing out the doomsday picture Mayor Bloomberg has laid out already about what would happen to schools if Governor Paterson’s proposed state budget is passed, Schools Chancellor Joel Klein told a joint session of the state legislature today that Paterson’s plan would force layoffs of 15,000 school-based staff, including teachers. He estimated the total state budget cut at $1.4 billion next year, a gigantic figure he said would translate into an 18% cut for every school next year.

He said that the schools could be forced to lay off staff as soon as this school year, because of a possible $84 million mid-year budget cut. “It would be right now saying to our schools, you’ve got to terminate people right away,” Klein said.

Klein is asking the legislature for help in cushioning against a scenario as bleak as that. He wants more flexibility in how the city schools are allowed to spend funds, especially Contracts for Excellence funds. He said he is also “praying” for help from the federal government.

“We don’t want to lose personnel,” he said later. “Particularly, we don’t want to lose young talented people that we’ve recruited in recent years.” If teacher layoffs happen, the least experienced teachers would be the first to lose their jobs, according to provisions in the teacher contract.

Klein said that cutting the Department of Education’s administrative budget is no longer possible. Right now, he said administrative costs make up just over 3% of the school system’s total costs. “That is about as small of an administrative budget as you’re going to see,” he said. “It means we have no choice but to cut back on core school operations to fill this budget hole.”

Klein is testifying at a joint budget hearing in Albany. You can watch the hearing live on the Internet here.

School choice

It started with vouchers and charter schools. Now Indiana’s exploring more ways for kids to learn outside traditional public schools.

PHOTO: Alan Petersime

Through its voucher and charter school programs, Indiana lawmakers have for years embraced strategies to promote school choice. Now, a new proposal that would let kids take classes outside their public schools could expand those efforts even further.

The program, which is already gaining attention nationally for being at the forefront of school choice strategies, is making its Indiana debut in recently filed House Bill 1007, authored by Rep. Tony Cook, R-Cicero.

The bill lays out the basics of what looks kind of like a voucher program, where students can use public dollars to pay for outside schooling — one course at a time. The “course access” program would allow students to choose certain classes to take outside their public school, such as an advanced physics course, Behning said. Then, those course providers would get a cut of a school or district’s state funding.

So far, there are no specifics on who providers might be, but Behning said they could also include public schools that have online or distance learning programs set up.

“It really makes sense when you talk about some of the smaller districts we have,” said Bob Behning, House Education Committee chairman. “Even in some of our urban districts, with some of the shortages we have, It makes sense to have some availability.”

Advocates, such as the International Association for K-12 Online Learning, said in a 2014 report that it levels the playing field between students, citing that students from low-income families, those who attend rural schools or minority students might have fewer opportunities than their wealthier urban or suburban counterparts.

But critics oppose the program for many of the same reasons they oppose a voucher program. The programs can funnel money away from public schools, typically taking a cut of a school’s state tuition dollars to pay whomever provides the outside classes. In some states, that has been for-profit education providers and online schools.

Online schools across Indiana and the United States have failed to demonstrate widespread academic achievement, but they remain a choice that a growing number of Indiana students and students across the country are turning to.

Under Indiana’s proposed bill, the Indiana Department of Education would be responsible for creating a list of classes for the program by June 30, 2018. A provider could be any one that offers these courses, through any method, including online instruction.

A course tuition fee would also need to be determined. Behning said it’s too early yet to say how much that fee might be, but according to state data, Utah districts paid providers between $200 and $350 per course in 2015 depending on the class being offered.

Teresa Meredith, president of the Indiana State Teachers Association, said she already knows of districts that can engage in partnerships with other types of educational providers without this legislation.

“It sounds like they are creating a solution to a problem that doesn’t exist if there is in fact a way for schools to already do something like this,” Meredith said.

Meredith also worries that by encouraging schools and districts to go to outside providers, it could exacerbate the teacher shortage. There’s little need to hire a licensed teacher if you can outsource the class, she said.

“We need to watch out for the details and ask the question of what problem is this trying to solve,” Meredith said.

Stay tuned

Tonight Indiana’s new governor will give his first state of the state address. What can we expect to hear about education?

PHOTO: Scott Elliott

Tonight Gov. Eric Holcomb will address Hoosiers in the annual State of the State address.

Holcomb so far has had a fairly light education policy agenda and K-12 budget with increases that some lawmakers say are not enough. With this year’s emphasis on road funding and transportation, it could be that education won’t figure prominently in his speech.

Earlier this month, Holcomb proposed sending an additional $280 million to Indiana schools — an increase of 3 percent. It would double the amount the state spends on preschool tuition in 2018 and 2019 in the original five counties, going from $10 million per year to $20 million. Holcomb’s preschool proposal differs from the priorities of other Republican legislative leaders.

Aside from the $280 million increase, Holcomb’s budget plan would also set aside $1 million per year for coordinating science, technology, engineering and math programs across the state and $1 million per year, with the possibility of federal matching grants, for districts to support internet access.

Another main part of his education agenda would be making Indiana’s elected schools chief a governor-appointed position beginning in 2021.

Former Gov. Mike Pence’s speech last year made many references to education, through ISTEP, A-F grades and the consequences they can have for schools and teachers.

The speech begins at 7 p.m. and can be streamed online. Follow Chalkbeat reporter @ShainaRC on Twitter for more.