child's play

In pre-K, Common Core fingerprints found on snack and a story

Chancellor Dennis Walcott prepares to read to a group of 4-year-olds at the Bank Street Head Start center.

Using skills developed at his first job, Chancellor Dennis Walcott dropped to the floor at Manhattan’s Bank Street Head Start center today and read a version of Goldilocks and the Three Bears to a circle of 4-year-olds.

Just as he said he had as a pre-kindergarten teacher in the 1970s, Walcott changed his voice for the different characters and acted out parts of the story, keeping the children laughing and acting along. (Watch video of the reading.)

The read-aloud came during a break in painting, mashing play dough, building with blocks, and assembling magnetic tiles — activities that look like fun and games but actually reflect the city’s academic goals for pre-K students.

Those goals are set out in the city’s new curriculum standards, called the Common Core, which start in pre-K. Like all city students, children in the Department of Education’s pre-K classes are expected to complete Common Core-aligned “tasks” this year like the ones the DOE has suggested for units about trucks, plants, and the five senses.

Among the Common Core standards for pre-K: Students should engage in group reading activities such as the one Walcott led and practice addition and subtraction using everyday objects.

In a second-floor classroom today, a 4-year-old boy sat with a staff member, counting the grapes on his plate. After deciding he had nine grapes already, he swooped in with a spoon to take “just one more” from the serving bowl. But he picked up two, prompting his teacher to say, “Is that one grape?”

“No! It’s two!” he answered.

In June, 18 pre-K directors were among the hundreds of school leaders who attended a presentation by David Coleman, the standards’ architect, that Walcott said elicited “off-the-chart” excitement. Pre-K staff have already started in on four trainings on the Common Core, and instructional coaches assigned to each center by the DOE are helping teachers figure out how to incorporate the new standards, according to Sophia Pappas, executive director of the DOE’s Office of Early Childhood Education, who joined Walcott for the visit.

Pre-K’s play-based instruction is an ideal showcase for the critical-thinking and problem-solving skills that the Common Core emphasizes, Pappas said. A recent study concluded that city kindergarteners spend an average of just 30 minutes a day on creative play.

Pappas said the Common Core could offer a roadmap for incorporating collaborative play beyond pre-K because early childhood and kindergarten teachers will for the first time be using the same language to talk about curriculum.

Chancellor Walcott and a Bank Street Head Start student and teacher practice counting using small plastic bears.

Three-year-olds at Bank Street, one of two centers associated with the Bankstreet College of Education, attend federally funded Head Start classes. Four-year-olds have full-day pre-kindergarten classes funded by Head Start and the state’s perennially underused universal pre-K budget line. That means the center must reapply for funding to the U.S. Department of Education, which announced last week that it would require all Head Start programs to prove they prepare children for kindergarten. The city is in the midst of a similar reauthorization process for early childhood centers that the Administration for Children’s Services runs to reapply for funding as part of an initiative called Early Learn.

Betsy DeVos

‘Underperformer,’ ‘bully,’ and a ‘mermaid with legs’: NYMag story slams Betsy DeVos

PHOTO: New York Magazine
A drawing of DeVos commissioned by an 8-year-old starts the New York Magazine article.

A new article detailing Betsy DeVos’s first six months as U.S. education secretary concludes that she’s “a mermaid with legs: clumsy, conspicuous, and unable to move forward.”

That’s just one of several brutal critiques of DeVos’s leadership and effectiveness in the New York Magazine story, by Lisa Miller, who has previously covered efforts to overhaul high schools, New York City’s pre-kindergarten push, and the apocalypse. Here are some highlights:

  • Bipartisan befuddlement: The story summarizes the left’s well known opposition to DeVos’s school choice agenda. But her political allies also say she’s making unnecessary mistakes: “Most mystifying to those invested in her success is why DeVos hasn’t found herself some better help.”
  • A friend’s defense: DeVos is “muzzled” by the Trump administration, said her friend and frequent defender Kevin Chavous, a school choice activist.
  • The department reacts: “More often than not press statements are being written by career staff,” a spokesperson told Miller, rejecting claims that politics are trumping policy concerns.
  • D.C. colleagues speak: “When you talk to her, it’s a blank stare,” said Charles Doolittle, who quit the Department of Education in June. A current education department employee says: “It’s not clear that the secretary is making decisions or really capable of understanding the elements of a good decision.”
  • Kids critique: The magazine commissioned six portraits of DeVos drawn by grade-schoolers.
  • Special Olympics flip-flop: DeVos started out saying she was proud to partner with the athletics competition for people with disabilities — and quickly turned to defending a budget that cuts the program’s funding.
  • In conclusion: DeVos is an underperformer,” a “bully” and “ineffective,” Miller found based on her reporting.

We’ve reached out for reaction from DeVos’s team and will update when we hear back.

home sweet home

‘Finally! Something useful’ or a dangerous mistake? Detroiters respond to city’s housing deal for teachers

PHOTO: Detroit Land Bank Authority
This home on Harvard Road was up for auction the week after Detroit announced a half-off-on-city-owned housing deal for teachers.

Friday’s announcement that all Detroit school employees — whether they work for district, charter, or parochial schools — will get a 50 percent discount on houses auctioned through the Detroit Land Bank Authority stirred a lot of discussion.

Some of our commenters on Facebook had high hopes for the deal:

But one commenter wondered if it’s the city of Detroit that’s actually getting the best deal, not the employees — or other people seeking to buy homes in the city:

And others argued that people who already live in Detroit won’t benefit from this deal:

Still, some readers appear to be ready to move — and have even picked homes to bid on (though not necessarily from the Land Bank Authority)!