public opinion

Poll: Voters don't trust city's teacher ratings but do back release

New York City voters by and large do not trust the teacher ratings released late last month. But most wouldn’t mind if future assessments of teachers’ quality were also made public, according to a poll whose results were released this morning.

The poll, conducted by Quinnipiac University last week, asked 964 New Yorkers about teacher evaluations both in theory and in practice. It found that just 20 percent of voters said they trusted the city’s “recently released teacher evaluations” known as Teacher Data Reports, and nearly half said the results were flawed. (The ratings, which had massive margins of error, were not actually used to evaluate teachers.) But 58 percent said they approved in theory of releasing the results of teacher evaluations to the public.

The poll’s findings suggest voters simply haven’t made up their minds about the role that teacher evaluations should play even as battles over new evaluations have dominated the headlines in recent months.

Just a third of poll respondents said they thought teachers who score low on evaluations should be fired, a use that advocates of new evaluations have championed. But 54 percent said they thought top-rated teachers should be rewarded with additional pay, something Mayor Bloomberg has suggested and the UFT has opposed. And 84 percent said they thought performance should trump seniority if the city needed to lay off teachers, a policy position that Bloomberg made his priority last spring, to no avail.

The poll contained soothing news for politicians worrying how to navigate the rocky terrain of public opinion on teacher evaluations: Sixty percent of respondents said whether a candidate supports the release of teacher ratings would not affect their vote.

Plus, the ratings’ release did not exact a toll on New Yorkers’ opinion of Chancellor Dennis Walcott or Mayor Bloomberg’s handling of the city public schools. Voters’ approval of Walcott, who publicly warned that the ratings were out of date and unreliable, actually rose significantly since February, to 43 percent, the highest since his tenure began a year ago.

Bloomberg, who defended the teacher ratings’ release even when Walcott was more circumspect, also saw a slight uptick in his approval rating on education. The poll found that 32 percent of New Yorkers approve of how Bloomberg is handling the schools, up slightly since February and relatively steady over the long term.

The proportion of New Yorkers who say they have a favorable opinion of city teachers also held steady, at about 50 percent, as did the portion who said the teachers union is playing a positive role in improving schools. (The poll of 964 registered voters, conducted March 6-11, had a margin of error of 3.2 percent.)

Both city and union officials found data points to support their positions in today’s poll results.

A spokeswoman for the city, Lauren Passalacqua, pointed to Walcott’s surging approval rating and noted that “even 74 percent of union households agree that teachers should be considered based on performance and not seniority.”

UFT President Michael Mulgrew, on the other hand, issued a statement targeting the low public approval for the Teacher Data Reports. “If I were Mayor Bloomberg, I’d be asking myself why only one in five voters trusts the information my administration just released on thousands of teachers,” he said.

home sweet home

‘Finally! Something useful’ or a dangerous mistake? Detroiters respond to city’s housing deal for teachers

PHOTO: Detroit Land Bank Authority
This home on Harvard Road was up for auction the week after Detroit announced a half-off-on-city-owned housing deal for teachers.

Friday’s announcement that all Detroit school employees — whether they work for district, charter, or parochial schools — will get a 50 percent discount on houses auctioned through the Detroit Land Bank Authority stirred a lot of discussion.

Some of our commenters on Facebook had high hopes for the deal:

But one commenter wondered if it’s the city of Detroit that’s actually getting the best deal, not the employees — or other people seeking to buy homes in the city:

And others argued that people who already live in Detroit won’t benefit from this deal:

Still, some readers appear to be ready to move — and have even picked homes to bid on (though not necessarily from the Land Bank Authority)!

race in the classroom

‘Do you see me?’ Success Academy theater teacher gives fourth-graders a voice on police violence

Success Academy student Gregory Hannah, one of the performers

In the days and weeks after last July’s police shootings of Alton Sterling and Philando Castile, teachers across New York grappled with how to talk about race and police violence. But for Sentell Harper, a theater teacher at Success Academy Bronx 2, those conversations had started long before.

CNN recently interviewed Harper about a spoken-word piece he created for his fourth-grade students to perform about what it means to be black and male in America. Harper, who just finished his fourth year teaching at Success, said that after the police killing of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri and the Black Lives Matter protests that followed, he wanted to check in with his students.

“I got my group of boys together, and I said, ‘Today, we’re going to talk about race,'” Harper told CNN. “And they had so much to say. They started telling me stories about their fathers and their brothers, and about dealing with racism — things that I never knew that these young boys went through.”

Inspired by their stories, he created a performance called “Alternative Names for Black Boys,” drawing on poems by Danez Smith, Tupac Shakur and Langston Hughes.

Wearing gray hoodies in honor of Trayvon Martin, who was killed while wearing one, the boys take turns naming black men and boys who have been killed: Freddie, Michael, Philando, Tamir. The list goes on.

Despite the sensitive nature of the subject matter, Harper says honesty is essential for him as a teacher. “Our kids are aware of race and want to talk about it,” he wrote in a post on Success Academy’s website. “As a black male myself, I knew I wanted to foster conversation between my students and within the school community.”

Click below to watch the performance.