he said she said

State senator finds holes in de Blasio's plan for universal pre-K

Screen shot 2013-08-19 at 2.16.50 PM
From the office of Public Advocate Bill de Blasio

State Sen. Diane Savino accused mayoral candidate and Public Advocate Bill de Blasio today of not understanding the legal issues behind providing universal pre-kindergarten to New York City students.

De Blasio has proposed taxing households that make more than $500,000 to fund full-day pre-K for all New York City children.

The senator, who spoke on a conference call set up by Bill Thompson’s campaign team, said creating universal pre-K in the city is not a matter of getting more money, but rather changing laws in Albany.

“Either Bill [de Blasio] doesn’t know how we fund universal pre-K or he’s just pandering. Because the fact is we don’t need to spend more money on this program,” she said.

Quoting the department’s 2011 legislative agenda, Savino noted that New York City had to send $31 million back to Albany because the funds can only be used toward half-day preschool, and working parents in the city require full-day programs.

Because of cuts to the state’s pre-K budget, the department returned $2.1 million last year, department officials said. They said the city has spent about $50 million of its funds annually on pre-K on average in recent years and has received about $225 million annually from the state in the last two years.

De Blasio’s campaign shot back and said de Blasio would work with Albany so that New York City can use half-day pre-K dollars for full day programs.

“But even if Albany agreed, it would come nowhere near providing enough funding to make full-day pre-K available to every child who needs it,” said campaign spokesman Dan Levitan.

According to de Blasio, it would cost an additional $341 million to fund full day pre-K for all city children.

But Savino disagreed.

“We have enough money,” she said. “What we don’t have is flexibility in the state’s regulations about how we spend the money we already get.”

City Council Speaker Christine Quinn, whose mayoral campaign said she has long spoken about the issue, recently told Capital New York she would lobby the state to allow the city to use half-day pre-K funds for full-day pre-K, as the Bloomberg administration has done. “That will get us a step closer. And then we will work to get the rest of the resources,” she said.

Comptroller and mayoral candidate John Liu also brought up this issue in 2011 when his office released an audit finding that the Department of Education had failed to use all its universal pre-K funds. The audit acknowledged that the forfeiture was the result of the state’s rules.

Levitan added, “Bill Thompson has refused to call for asking the wealthy to pay anything more so that every child can get the head start they deserve.” Thompson talked about expanding pre-kindergarten when he released his education platform in May but has not provided any more specific details about how he would fund and execute his plan. He has vowed not to raise taxes on New Yorkers.

home sweet home

‘Finally! Something useful’ or a dangerous mistake? Detroiters respond to city’s housing deal for teachers

PHOTO: Detroit Land Bank Authority
This home on Harvard Road was up for auction the week after Detroit announced a half-off-on-city-owned housing deal for teachers.

Friday’s announcement that all Detroit school employees — whether they work for district, charter, or parochial schools — will get a 50 percent discount on houses auctioned through the Detroit Land Bank Authority stirred a lot of discussion.

Some of our commenters on Facebook had high hopes for the deal:

But one commenter wondered if it’s the city of Detroit that’s actually getting the best deal, not the employees — or other people seeking to buy homes in the city:

And others argued that people who already live in Detroit won’t benefit from this deal:

Still, some readers appear to be ready to move — and have even picked homes to bid on (though not necessarily from the Land Bank Authority)!

beyond high school

Tennessee leads nation in FAFSA filings for third straight year

PHOTO: TN.gov
Bill Haslam has been Tennessee's governor since 2011.

Equipping more Tennesseans with the tools to succeed after high school has been a hallmark of Gov. Bill Haslam’s administration. And the efforts seem to be paying off as the governor heads into his final 18 months in office.

Haslam announced on Thursday that the state has set another new record for the number of high school seniors filing their Free Application for Federal Student Aid, also known as FAFSA.

With 73.5 percent completing the form for the upcoming academic year — an increase of 3.2 percent from last year — Tennessee led the nation in FAFSA filings for the third straight year, according to the governor’s office.

The increase isn’t surprising, given that students had a longer period to fill out the form last year. In order to make the process more user-friendly, the FAFSA window opened on Oct. 1 instead of Jan. 1.

But the increase remains significant. The FAFSA filing rate is one indicator that more students are pursuing educational opportunities beyond a high school diploma.

Getting students ready for college and career has been a major focus under Haslam, a businessman and former Knoxville mayor who became governor in 2011. He launched his Drive to 55 initiative in 2013 with the goal that at least 55 percent of Tennesseans will have postsecondary degrees or other high-skill job certifications by 2025.

“The continued surge in FAFSA filing rates shows the Drive to 55 is changing the college-going culture in Tennessee,” Haslam said in a news release. “First-time freshman enrollment in Tennessee has grown 13 percent in the past two years and more students than ever are going to college. As a state, we have invested in making college accessible and open to everyone and students are hearing the message.”

According to calculations from the Tennessee Higher Education Commission, Tennessee led all states by a large margin this year. The closest states or districts were Washington D.C., 64.8 percent; Delaware, 61.6 percent; New Jersey, 61 percent; and Massachusetts, 60.4 percent.

The commission calculated the filing rates using data provided through June 30 from the U.S. Department of Education.

Filing the FAFSA is a requirement to qualify for both state and federal financial aid and is part of the application process for most colleges and universities across the nation.

To get more students to complete the form, state and local FAFSA drives have been organized in recent years to connect Tennessee students with resources, guidance and encouragement.

U.S. Sen. Lamar Alexander has championed bipartisan efforts to simplify the FAFSA process. The Tennessee Republican and former governor introduced legislation in 2015 that would reduce the FAFSA paperwork from a hefty 108 questions down to two pertaining to family size and household income.

You can read more information about the FAFSA in Tennessee here.