reading list

Weekend Reads: Why Bill Gates’ education revelation has him investing in teaching

  • Looking back at eight years of trying to influence education policy, Bill Gates said it’s been harder than he thought. But he isn’t giving up on investing in improving teacher quality. (Hechinger Report)
  • A new initiative at Harvard University aims to fix America’s “non system” of supporting quality teaching. (Teacher Beat)
  • A new study found that in 50 of the largest U.S. cities, fewer than one in three students take either the ACT or the SAT, which most colleges require for admission. (NPR Ed)
  • One of the central promises of the Common Core — that families and policymakers could compare how students are doing across states because they use the same standards and tests — could be unraveling as Ohio officials opt to interpret their test results differently than other places. (Washington Post)
  • Schools might worsen racial and economic achievement gaps in math, two new studies say. (EdWeek)
  • Teachers at a California charter school dreamed up a tool to let them customize the day for individual students. Facebook helped them build it — and now is taking it national. (Hechinger Report)
  • Encouraged by his teachers, a black teen from West Baltimore is hoping his creative efforts will help redefine the neighborhood beyond images of violence and poverty. (The Atlantic)
  • Thousands of district teacher jobs that would be lost are becoming a political issue in the debate over a massive charter expansion proposal there. (L.A. Times)
  • A Florida school district is settling a lawsuit with the families of three students who died within months of each other after their high school principal hypnotized them. (Slate)
  • A special education teacher shares her experience working to meet her own son’s special needs. (The Mighty)
  • Here’s a primer for parents about classes that mix students with and without disabilities. (Insideschools)
  • Incoming education secretary John King has neither the carrots nor the sticks that his predecessor, Arne Duncan, wielded. (Politics K-12)
  • A parent exhorts his peers: Ask not what a school can do for your own child. Ask what it can do for all children. (Notebook)

reading list

Weekend Reads: ‘Love and love hard,’ a KIPP Tulsa teacher tells us all

PHOTO: Caroline Bauman
  • New Haven’s schools chief has fallen out of favor after seven years there, and now he’s looking to leave. (N.H. Independent)
  • The KIPP charter network urged its schools to act after Terence Crutcher, a KIPP dad, was killed by police in Tulsa. (Chalkbeat)
  • What that action looked like at KIPP Tulsa College Prep, where at least 10 students are related to Crutcher. (Tulsa World)
  • A teacher at the school went viral after sharing her experiences talking to students — and her advice to “love and love hard.” (Facebook)
  • Great teachers are experts at having hard conversations. Here’s their advice to America. (Chalkbeat)
  • One of Nevada’s wealthiest women is also the state’s glamorous board of education president. (Pacific Standard)
  • Two seasoned education policy wonks are leading Donald Trump’s education transition planning. (Politics K-12)
  • Why is Tennessee’s first single-sex charter school thriving? Not for the reason you might think. (The Atlantic)
  • Efforts are underway to improve black students’ experience at a diverse school where they still come out behind. (Bloomberg)

reading list

Weekend Reads: Why Texas stopped students with disabilities from getting the help they need

PHOTO: Alan Petersime
  • A story about school choice in Philadelphia didn’t mention race drew criticism from Nikole Hannah-Jones (and others). (Billy Penn)
  • What KIPP did after it realized how many graduates were dropping out of college has changed the conversation about success. (Chalkbeat)
  • Texas has systematically prevented children with disabilities from getting the help they’re legally entitled to, according to a new investigation. (Houston Chronicle)
  • An exit interview with Kaya Henderson, the chief who took D.C. schools from “dead” to cracking down on families faking addresses to get in. (Scholastic)
  • Watch this video to get up speed on the Common Core standards and why they’re still under fire. (EdWeek)
  • A coach speaks directly, and encouragingly, to a student whose teacher sees him as a problem. (Education Post)
  • What Donald Trump is really saying when he says he’d create home-school vouchers for poor kids. (Slate)
  • A new study found that the greatest determinant of police surveillance in schools is the presence of students of color. (The Atlantic)
  • Catch up on the last year — and century — in Detroit schools, one of the few places where police seem to be visible in that city. (Harpers)
  • Among the details in a lawsuit challenging the quality of education in Detroit: condoms on the floor and teachers without training. (Chalkbeat)