diversity plans

12 more New York City schools will experiment with admissions rules to boost diversity

PHOTO: Patrick Wall
Schools Chancellor Carmen Fariña

A dozen New York City schools have joined a pilot admissions initiative to promote student diversity, according to information released Thursday by the Department of Education.

For the first time, the “Diversity in Admissions” program includes middle and high schools, with a total of 19 schools now participating.

“I believe that increasing school diversity means improving our students’ education, and I am personally committed to this work,” schools Chancellor Carmen Fariña said in a statement.

After an initial pilot at seven schools in Manhattan and Brooklyn, the city gave all schools the opportunity to apply for the program starting in spring 2016. Under the program, schools set aside a percentage of seats for students who are poor, are English learners or meet other criteria, such as having an incarcerated parent.

The new admissions policies will be in place for students applying to schools for the 2017-2018 school year.

Matt Gonzales, who focuses on school diversity issues for the social justice nonprofit New York Appleseed, applauded the expansion of the program. But he also said the wide array of targets — from 10 percent of seats set aside at one school to more than 60 percent at others — highlights the need for the DOE to create citywide policies for integration.

“There are limitations to not having having clear accountability standards,” he said.

The education department also announced that three new schools have been approved for PROSE diversity mini-grants. The PROSE program was negotiated with the United Federation of Teachers to give schools flexibility to pursue changes in admissions criteria and teacher evaluations, among other policies.

Here are the new schools that have joined the program:

* East Village Community School, Manhattan: Students who qualify for free or reduced-price lunch or are learning English will have priority for 50 percent of pre-K and kindergarten seats.

* P.S. 361 The Children’s Workshop School, Manhattan: Students who qualify for free or reduced-price lunch or are learning English will have priority for 50 percent of pre-K and kindergarten seats.

* P.S. 3 Charrette School, Manhattan: Students who qualify for free or reduced-price lunch will have priority for pre-K and kindergarten seats after all zoned students are admitted.

* P.S. 527 East Side School for Social Action, Manhattan: Students who qualify for free or reduced-price lunch will have priority for pre-K and kindergarten seats after all zoned students are admitted.

* P.S. 77 New American Academy, Brooklyn: Students who qualify for free or reduced-price lunch will have priority for 40 percent of pre-K and kindergarten seats.

* Brooklyn School of Inquiry: Students who qualify for free or reduced-price lunch will have priority for 40 percent of Gifted and Talented seats.

* East Side Community School, Manhattan: Students who qualify for free or reduced-price lunch will have priority for 62 percent of seats.

* East Side Middle School, Manhattan: Students who qualify for free or reduced-price lunch will have priority for 10 percent of seats.

* M.S. 447 The Math and Science Exploratory School, Brooklyn: Students who qualify for free or reduced-price lunch will have priority for 30 percent of seats. The school will also change its admissions process to accept more academically diverse students.

* M.S. 839, Brooklyn: Students who qualify for free or reduced-price lunch will have priority for 40 percent of seats.

* Harvest Collegiate High School, Manhattan: Students who qualify for free lunch will have priority for 64 percent of seats.

* Central Park East High School, Manhattan: Students who qualify for free lunch will have priority for 64 percent of seats.

Building Better Schools

Training overhaul aimed at a big IPS shortfall: Just 1 in 4 student teachers stick around.

PHOTO: Alan Petersime

Seventy-four student teachers trained in Indianapolis Public Schools last year. But just 17 of those freshly minted educators were hired by the district after they graduated.

In a district where some schools struggle to hire enough teachers, that gap is a problem.

That’s why IPS is revamping teacher training to give student teachers more time in the classroom and attract new educators to the district.

“We really need to focus in on the folks who are student teaching in our buildings, making sure they have a really strong experience,” said Mindy Schlegel, who leads human resources for the district.

In order to attract new teachers and make sure they are well prepared, IPS is rolling out a host of plans, from making sure student teachers in traditional programs are working with experienced mentors to launching two new residency programs.

The residencies, which will be selective, will allow students to spend one to three years in the classroom — far more than the six to nine weeks education students typically spend teaching, said Schlegel.

Those plans are among three programs getting a boost from a new grant program run by the Mind Trust, a nonprofit that supports Indianapolis school reform.

  • IPS received a three-year, $207,000 grant to pay for a staffer dedicated to improving student teaching in the district;
  • KIPP Indianapolis received a three-year, $38,500 grant for a new yearlong leadership program for current teachers; and
  • Christel House Academy received a $20,000 grant to plan IndyTeach, a transition-to-teaching program at the charter school that it plans to pilot in 2017-2018.

The program will support new efforts to improve teacher recruitment, training, retention and diversity, said Jackie Gantzer, director of talent strategy for the Mind Trust.

“A lot of the best solutions to any one of those pieces is likely going to be developed and driven locally by schools and networks and the teachers who are in that environment,” she said. “We are really interested in testing those hypotheses and seeing what is effective and what can potentially be scaled.”

IPS plans to begin the first teaching residency this fall, with about 10 students from Purdue University’s online degree program in special education. The students will train in IPS schools during the three-year program.

The other residency is still in the planning stages, but the aim is to assign college students to work with experienced teachers in schools using new teacher-leadership models.

One reason the district is focusing its attention on improving recruitment of student teachers is that it is hard to attract educators from other areas, Schlegel said.

“A lot of urban districts are moving in this direction because it is so difficult to get teachers to relocate,” she said. “(We) are really refocusing our recruitment efforts to what local pipelines exist.”

clearing a hurdle

These 20 schools just won approval from the Denver school board

PHOTO: Denver Post
Students and staffers at Rocky Mountain Prep charter school in Denver cheer in 2012.

The Denver school board Thursday unanimously approved 11 new elementary charter schools, all of which are part of charter networks that already have a presence in the city.

The board also approved new elementaries that would be managed by the school district and three charter high schools, one of which targets teenagers in addiction recovery.

In winning board approval, the schools cleared a necessary hurdle to open in the state’s largest district. But that doesn’t mean all will open, or open right away. Some are seeking placement in a Denver Public Schools building, while others are planning to find their own real estate.

DPS every year solicits new schools to join its nationally recognized “portfolio” of district-run, innovation, charter and magnet schools. Because of slowing enrollment growth, the district didn’t solicit any new standalone schools this year. Such schools were still welcome to apply — and many did. But the only new schools sought by the district were replacements for existing schools scheduled to be closed due to chronic poor performance.

Three of the elementary schools approved Thursday are competing to serve as a replacement for low-performing Amesse Elementary, which is slated to close next year.

However, only two of the schools will move forward to the next stage of the competition: consideration by a review board that will recommend which school the DPS board should pick when it makes its final decision next month. District staff found the plan for teaching English language learners submitted by the other school, University Prep, fell short of requirements.

Two other elementary schools applied to replace Greenlee Elementary, also scheduled to close.

But the board on Thursday rejected the application of one of them, a Wyoming-based charter school called PODER Academy whose founder complained his school wasn’t given a fair shot because of “prior controversy.” As such, only one school will move forward to the review board.

DPS board members also denied a charter to SLAM Colorado, a proposed school based on a Miami charter that focuses on sports and was founded by rapper Pitbull.

Several board members noted that both DPS staff and an independent committee of community members that reviewed the charter application found that the proposals submitted by PODER and SLAM did not meet the district’s quality standards.

Superintendent Tom Boasberg said he’s encouraged “to see such a strong mix of schools, both district-run and charter,” get approved. He said the large number of new elementary schools speaks to “a real focus on the district-level and the charter side on really trying to strengthen our elementary schools” after years of focusing more on improving secondary schools.

Below, read the applications of all the new schools approved Thursday:

The Center for Talent Development at Greenlee, a district-run elementary school proposed by the current Greenlee principal as a replacement for the program that will shutter next year.

The Montbello Children’s Network, a district-run elementary school proposed by the principal of nearby McGlone Academy as a replacement for Amesse.

Denver Elementary Community School 1, 2, 3 and 4, four district-run elementary schools proposed by DPS central-office staff members that could serve as replacements for low-performing schools slated for closure in the future.

KIPP Sunshine Peak Elementary, a charter elementary school that would serve southwest Denver and add to the roster of KIPP schools already operating in Denver.

Rocky Mountain Prep 4, 5 and 6, three more schools in the elementary-focused charter network, which currently operates two schools in Denver and one in Aurora.

STRIVE Prep Elementary 4, 5 and 6, three more elementary schools in the local charter network, which currently operates 11 schools serving kindergarten through 12th grade.

A previously approved STRIVE Prep Elementary is competing to replace Amesse.

University Prep 3, 4, 5 and 6, four more schools in the elementary-focused charter network, which currently operates two schools in Denver. University Prep 3 is also competing to replace Amesse but its application will not move forward in the process because it did not meet the requirements of a program to teach English language learners.

5280 High School, a charter high school focused on project-based learning that would also offer a program for students in recovery from addiction, eating disorders and other challenges.

The CUBE, a personalized learning charter high school aiming to open in northeast Denver.

Colorado High School Charter GES, another location of a charter alternative high school.

Correction: A previous version of this story stated that two other schools, Cooperative Community Schools and an expansion of Academy 360, also won approval. The board did not vote on those schools Thursday.