Early admissions

Applying to pre-K, kindergarten or gifted programs? Here’s where to learn more

PHOTO: Patrick Wall
Members of the city's pre-K outreach team encourage parents to enroll their four-year-olds during the last admissions cycle.

New York City families who are navigating the admissions process for pre-K, kindergarten, and gifted programs can, for the first time, attend information sessions in all 32 community school districts.

Sessions begin Nov. 1. City Department of Education staff will be on hand to help families find their zoned schools and non-zoned options, sign up students to test for gifted and talented programs, and answer questions about transportation, special education and programs for English learners.

To make the application process easier, this year marks the first time parents can learn about pre-K, kindergarten and gifted programs in a combined event.

“We’re committed to making it easier for families to find and enroll in the school that’s right for them,” Josh Wallack, a deputy chancellor for the DOE, said in a statement.

Here’s a list of information sessions by borough.

Manhattan:

Monday, November 7
6 p.m. – 8 p.m.
P.S. 92 Mary McLeod Bethune
222 W. 134th St.

Wednesday, November 9
6 p.m. – 8 p.m.
P.S./I.S. 210 Twenty-first Century Academy For Community Leadership
501-503 W. 152nd St.

Wednesday, November 9
6 p.m. – 8 p.m.
M.S. 260 Clinton School for Writers and Artists
10 East 15th St.

Thursday, November 10
6 p.m. – 8 p.m.
P.S. 333 Manhattan School for Children
154 W. 93rd St.

Thursday, November 17
4:30 p.m. -7:30 p.m.
The Tito Puente Complex
240 E. 109th St.

Thursday, Dec. 1
6 p.m. – 8 p.m.
P.S. 134 Henrietta Szold
293 E. Broadway

The Bronx

Monday, November 7
6 p.m. -8 p.m.
P.S. 119
1075 Pugsley Ave.

Wednesday, November 9
6 p.m. – 8 p.m.
P.S. 65 Mother Hale Academy
677 East 141st St.

Thursday, November 10
6 p.m. – 8 p.m.
P.S./I.S. 218 Rafael Hernandez Dual Language Magnet School
1220 Gerard Ave.

Monday, November 14
6 p.m. – 8 p.m.
P.S./M.S. 194
2365 Waterbury Ave.

Thursday, November 17
6 p.m. – 8 p.m.
P.S. 279 Captain Manuel Rivera, Jr.
2100 Walton Ave.

Thursday, November 17
6 p.m. – 8 p.m.
P.S. 214
1970 West Farms Road

Brooklyn

Tuesday, November 1
6 p.m. – 8 p.m.
P.S. 308 Clara Cardwell
616 Quincy St.

Tuesday, November 1
6 p.m. – 8 p.m.
P.S. 66
845 East 96 St.

Tuesday, November 1
6 p.m. – 8 p.m.
P.S. 156K Waverly School of the Arts
104 Sutter Ave.

Monday, November 7
6 p.m. – 8 p.m.
I.S. 96 Seth Low
99 Ave. P

Monday, November 7
6 p.m. – 8 p.m.
P.S. 376
194 Harman St.

Wednesday, November 9
6 p.m. – 8 p.m.
P.S. 770 The New American Academy
60 E. 94th St.

Thursday, November 10
6 p.m. – 8 p.m.
P.S. 13 Roberto Clemente
557 Pennsylvania Ave.

Monday, November 14
6 p.m. – 8 p.m.
P.S. 24
427 38th St.

Monday, November 14
6 p.m. – 8 p.m.
P.S. 222 Katherine R. Snyder
3301 Quentin Road

Tuesday, November 15
6:30 p.m. – 8:30 p.m.
P.S. 133 William A. Butler
610 Baltic St.

Tuesday, November 15
6 p.m. – 8 p.m.
Franklin D. Roosevelt High School
5800 20th Ave.

Thursday, November 17
6 p.m. – 8 p.m.
P.S. 110 The Monitor
124 Monitor St.

Queens

Tuesday, November 1
6 p.m. – 8 p.m.
P.S. 35 Nathaniel Woodhull
191-02 90th Ave.

Monday, November 7
6 p.m. – 8 p.m.
P.S. 182 Samantha Smith
153-27 88th Ave.

Monday, November 14
6 p.m. – 8 p.m.
I.S. 25 Adrien Block
34-65 192nd St.

Monday, November 14
6 p.m. – 8 p.m.
M.S. 137 America’s School Of Heroes
109-15 98th St.

Wednesday, November 16
6 p.m. – 8 p.m.
P.S./I.S. 266
74-10 Commonwealth Blvd.

Wednesday, November 16
6 p.m. – 8 p.m.
P.S. 110
43-18 97th Place

Thursday, November 17
6 p.m. – 8 p.m.
The Woodside Community School
39-07 57th St.

Staten Island

Thursday, November 10
6 p.m. – 8 p.m.
P.S. 58 Space Shuttle Columbia School
77 Marsh Ave.

Behind the numbers

New York City is touting grad rates at its lowest-performing high schools, but far fewer students are graduating from them

PHOTO: Patrick Wall
John Adams High School in Queens, a Renewal school.

When education officials announced this month that New York City had achieved the highest graduation rates in history, they made a point of highlighting the gains in high schools that have struggled for years.

At the city’s 31 “Renewal” high schools — historically low-performing schools that receive extra social services and academic support — graduation rates have increased 7 percent since 2014. That growth is greater than the 4.2 percent average boost across all high schools over the same timeframe (though at 59 percent, Renewal schools’ average grad rate is still still far below the city’s 72.6 percent average).

The city touted these figures as evidence that Mayor Bill de Blasio’s Renewal program, which is projected to cost $850 million, is having an effect — good news for education officials who have struggled to point to clear signs of progress in the face of decidedly mixed results.

But despite the increase in graduation rates, Renewal schools are graduating far fewer students than even one year ago, according to a Chalkbeat review, and roughly half of Renewal schools have higher dropout rates than when the program started — a sign that the city is still struggling to persuade students to enroll and stay in them.

Just 3,371 students graduated from Renewal schools last year, 10 percent fewer than the previous year, and 18 percent fewer than the 4,121 who graduated three years ago, immediately before the program started rolling out.

August Martin High School, for instance, has boosted its graduation rate by nearly 14 percent over the past two years. But the Queens school also shed nearly a third of its 679 students over the same period.

“In one sense, it can almost be framed as a marketing problem,” said Aaron Pallas, a professor at Columbia University’s Teachers College. Even though many Renewal schools have been losing students since before they were placed in the program, “schools that are struggling and have been identified [as Renewal schools] are not as attractive to families.”

Enrollment problems pose an existential threat. School funding is partially dependent on the number of students in the building, and as that number slips, schools may need extra cash just to offer core math and English classes — let alone extracurricular activities or art classes. And last month, the city cited low enrollment as one factor in its plan to close or merge nine Renewal schools.

Department of Education spokesman Michael Aciman acknowledged the enrollment drop-off, but pointed out that the rate of decline slowed across Renewal high schools this year. “We are explicitly working with school leaders and families to highlight improvements and help them get the word out about the strong work that is happening in an effort to reverse those trends,” he wrote in an email.

The new data also reveals that while a greater proportion of students at Renewal high schools are graduating, dropout rates have remained stubborn: Sixteen of the 31 Renewal high schools posted higher dropout rates last year than when the program started.

Partly due to enrollment declines, the raw number of students dropping out was about 25 percent lower last year than when the program started. But the overall dropout rate at Renewal schools has increased to 19 percent, about one percentage point higher than it was three years ago, and more than double the city average of 8.5 percent.

Aciman noted several efforts designed to shepherd high school students to graduation, including prep for high school exit exams, and tools that allow educators to better track students who are chronically absent or falling behind on credits.

And he pointed to data that shows progress in reducing in rates of chronic absenteeism and boosts in attendance — signs of engagement, he said, that could ultimately affect future graduation and dropout rates.

“Decreasing the dropout rate at Renewal schools will take time,” Aciman wrote, “but we’re putting the necessary structures and early interventions in place to make sustainable improvements.”

help wanted

Memphis charter office seeks to double in size to keep up with growing sector

PHOTO: Laura Faith Kebede
From left: Stacey Thompson, charter planning and authorizer for Shelby County Schools, confers with director of charter schools Charisse Sales and Brad Leon, chief of strategy and performance management.

Shelby County Schools is about to double the size of its staff overseeing charter schools.

About a year after a national consultant called the district’s oversight deficient, the school system is seeking to reorganize its team and hire more help.

With 45 charter schools, Shelby County Schools is Tennessee’s largest charter authorizer but has only three people to watch over the sector — “lean for a portfolio of its size,” according to a report by the National Association of Charter School Authorizers, or NACSA.

The charter office reviews applications for new schools, monitors quality of academic programs, ensures compliance with state and federal laws, and can recommend revocation for poor performance.

NACSA Vice President William Haft said the changes point to a school system that is becoming more sophisticated in collaborating with charter schools in order to improve innovation in the classroom.

Shelby County Schools “grew quickly as an authorizer,” he noted, and at a time when the district was also restructuring quickly due to the 2013 merger of city and county schools and subsequent exit of six municipalities.

“When you have just a handful of charter schools, naturally it’s just a small organization and you have an all-hands-on-deck mindset. … Everybody pitches in,” Haft said. “Now there’s an opportunity. And to their credit, the district is recognizing and … taking action to develop those structures that are now absolutely necessary.”

The new positions, which were advertised this month, would add more specificity to job responsibilities.

Brad Leon, the district’s chief of strategy and performance management, said the restructuring is to meet the needs of a growing number of charter school students, including thousands under the state-run Achievement School District who eventually will return to local governance.

“This is part of the strategic staffing plan …,” Leon said. “This team will be directly responsible for ensuring that children in our community have the opportunity to attain an excellent education and for moving forward the district’s priority around expanding high quality school options.”

The hires also are designed to boost the relationship between charters and the district, which have become increasingly strained over funding and processes. Last spring, confusion over the district’s charter policies came to a head with the revocation of four charters.

Shelby County Schools authorized its first three charter schools in 2003, one year after the state legislature passed a law allowing nonprofit operators to open schools in Tennessee. Though the sector has swelled to 45 schools, its oversight office has only grown from two to three staff members.

With charter schools now firmly entrenched in Memphis’ education landscape, the district has sought to step up its oversight of them. Last year, Shelby County Schools issued its first-ever report on the state of charter schools in Memphis. A charter advisory committee also was created to find ways to improve oversight and collaboration in academics, financing and facilities.

Coming out of that committee is a voluntary authorizer fee. Many Memphis operators have said they are willing to pay the fee in exchange for better oversight and collaboration, including adding more staff to the charter office.

“(Charter leaders) look forward to continuing to work with them and others that the district looks to add to the office in order to continue the steps to becoming a high quality authorizer for SCS charter schools,” said Luther Mercer, Memphis advocacy director for Tennessee Charter School Center and co-chairman of the charter advisory committee.