big plans

City unveils plan to grow Park Slope’s P.S. 282 and phase out its middle school

PHOTO: Cassi Feldman
P.S. 282

In Park Slope, Brooklyn, where popular elementary schools inspire cultish devotion, P.S. 282 has long been an outlier, struggling to attract families who live nearby. But in recent years, thanks in part to a new principal, the school has been on the rise — and now a new city plan could help it grow.

The Department of Education has proposed doing away with P.S. 282’s middle school grades — and replacing them with roughly 300 more students in the elementary school. The proposal would boost elementary school enrollment by around 50 percent over the next three years, while eliminating grades six through eight over the same period.

Education officials said the plan would help meet increased demand for elementary school seats in one of the city’s fasting growing districts. Meanwhile, a new middle school in Dumbo and another in development in Prospect Heights could help offset the loss of middle school seats.

“Our goal is to provide a strong learning environment and expanded resources to all students, and this proposal will help increase the number of elementary seats in District 13,” said Department of Education spokesman Michael Aciman.

P.S. 282 has been in flux since Principal Magalie Alexis, who had a contentious relationship with parents and staff, resigned in 2014. She was replaced by Rashan Hoke, a longtime teacher at Inwood’s P.S. 5.

“It’s like night and day,” said PTO co-president Andrew Marshall, whose daughter is now a fifth-grader at the school. “He’s firm, he’s fair. He looks at the parents as equals.”

Unlike P.S. 321, where approximately 75 percent of students are white, P.S. 282 serves a more diverse population. Last year, it was 59 percent black, 25 percent Hispanic, 9 percent white and 3 percent Asian.

The percentage of students who passed state tests last spring was up from the year prior. Just over 44 percent passed English, compared to a citywide average of 38 percent; and around 34 percent passed math, just under the citywide average of 36 percent.

“We’ve got a strong foundation for growth,” Stephen Hamill, chair of the School Leadership Team, wrote in an email. “But we want to make sure that this proposal will be good for our families and we retain a strong pipeline to excellent middle schools.”

A meeting will be held at the school to discuss the plan on Monday and public hearings will follow. The proposal is expected to be voted on by the Panel for Educational Policy on Dec. 21.

Principal Hoke said in a statement that he welcomes the chance to discuss details of the plan. “I look forward to the opportunity to engage our school community as we continue to consider our options,” he said.

moving forward

New York City officials: Large-scale school desegregation plan likely coming by June

PHOTO: BRIC TV
Deputy Chancellor Josh Wallack, third from left, discussing the city's integration efforts.

Mayor Bill de Blasio has promised a “bigger vision” to address segregation in New York City schools, but officials have thus far kept details under wraps.

But they’ve been dribbling out some details, most notably a timeline for when a large-scale plan could be released. Officials at a town hall discussion in Brooklyn Thursday night reiterated that a plan would likely be released by June.

We’re “going to propose some new thinking that we have, both about some of the systems that we run and about ways that we can work together locally to make change,” said Deputy Chancellor Josh Wallack, who is heading the department’s diversity efforts. “We expect it to come out by the end of the school year.”

BRIC TV host Brian Vines, who moderated the panel co-produced with WNYC, pushed for details. “Is there any one thing that you can at least give us a hint at that’s a concrete measure?” he asked.

But Wallack didn’t take the bait. “What I will say is that we are actually still engaged in conversations like this one, trying to get good ideas about how to move forward,” he said, adding that the education department is talking with educators, parents and schools interested in the issue.

New York City officials have been under pressure to address school segregation after a 2014 report called its schools some of the most racially divided in the country. More recently, debates over how best to change zone lines around schools on the Upper West Side and in Brooklyn have grown heated.

“We have a lot of hard work to do,” Wallack said. “But the mayor and chancellor are deeply committed to that work and to working with all of you to make that happen.”

Correction (Dec. 2, 2016): This story has been corrected to reflect that the town hall event was not the first time officials had described a timeline for releasing a plan.

data points

Six stats that show how black and Latino students in New York City are subjected to disproportionate policing

PHOTO: Monica Disare
Advocates protest school suspension policy.

Arrests, summonses, and serious crimes are all trending downward in city schools, but a new analysis shows black and Latino students continue to be disproportionately subjected to police interventions and handcuffing, even during incidents that aren’t considered criminal.

Those findings come from a New York Civil Liberties Union review of new NYPD statistics on student interactions with regular precinct officers, in addition to their contact with school safety agents posted in schools. Thanks to a city law passed in 2015, this year is the first time those numbers have been publicly released (in previous years, the NYPD only released data on incidents involving school safety agents).

The new statistics add second-quarter data to first-quarter numbers released in July, revealing the persistence of troubling racial disparities over the first half of 2016. Here are six key data points from the NYCLU analysis:

  • In the first six months of the yearabout 91 percent of school-based arrests, and nearly 93 percent of summonses, were issued to black or Latino students (a population that represents nearly 70 percent of the school population).
  • More than 60 percent of all arrests and summonses during the same period were carried out by precinct officers, not school safety agents. “That means precinct-based officers with no specialized training enter schools and arrest children without regard for the impact on school climate,” according to the NYCLU.
  • There have been 1,210 school-related incidents where children were handcuffed in the first half of 2016. Nearly 93 percent involved students who were black or Latino.
  • Between April and July there were 94 incidents where a student showed “signs of emotional distress” and was handcuffed and taken to a hospital for further evaluation. Ninety-seven percent involved students who were black or Hispanic.
  • Over the same period, the city issued 255 “juvenile reports” — which are taken for students who are under 16 and involved in incidents that, if the students were adults, could count as crimes. Ninety-two percent of the reports were issued to black and Latino students. And though only 20 percent of students issued juvenile reports were handcuffed, 100 percent of those restrained were black or Latino.
  • There were 44 “mitigation” incidents, in which a student committed an offense and was handcuffed, but then released by the NYPD to school officials for discipline. All of those students were black or Latino.

You can find the NYCLU’s annual roundup of suspension data here.