final countdown

City unveils long-awaited rezoning proposal for the Upper West Side — and a new plan for schools in Harlem

PHOTO: Department of Education
The city's final plan for rezoning District 3.

The New York City Department of Education on Wednesday released its final proposal to rezone schools on the Upper West Side — and advanced a new, separate plan to shift school zones in Harlem.

The Upper West Side proposal is sure to be controversial: It includes the city’s previous plans to move P.S. 452 to a new site about 16 blocks away, and cuts some families from the Lincoln Towers development out of the zone for high-performing P.S. 199.

Parents at both schools have railed against those changes in a fight that has forced the district to reckon with the fact that many of its schools are deeply segregated by race and class.

In the southern end of the district, the rezoning is needed to address those issues, according to the DOE, and to relieve overcrowding.

“The District 3 elementary school zones have long failed to reflect the neighborhoods served by schools in the district, and it’s our obligation to find solutions that provide the strongest learning environments for all students,” schools Chancellor Carmen Fariña said in a statement. “This proposal gets at persisting issues around overcrowding and segregation.”

Along with the zoning changes, the department announced additional supports and a new gifted program for P.S. 191. The city’s plan to shift students to that school from nearby P.S. 199 has drawn sharp resistance from parents.

P.S. 191 has struggled on state tests; its students are mainly black and Hispanic, and poor. P.S. 199, on the other hand, is high-performing, majority white, and has a student poverty rate of less than 10 percent.

Additional elements of the plan for the Upper West Side plan include:

— A smaller zone size for P.S. 87, to help address overcrowding.

— A new proposal to move M.S. 247 from its current space at P.S. 84 into the space being vacated by P.S. 452. The move will allow P.S. 84 to potentially expand its pre-K classes and dual language programs.

In the northern end of the district, the city’s new proposal divides the zones lines for Harlem’s P.S 241 among three neighboring schools. The department has previously announced the proposed merger of P.S. 241 with P.S. 76.

While parents on the Upper West side have known for more than a year that a rezoning was in the works, details of the Harlem plan were revealed for the first time on Wednesday, giving parents there little time to weigh in on the changes.

The Community Education Council must vote to approve or reject the new zone lines, and members of the volunteer group have said they hope to have a plan in place by the time kindergarten applications open on November 30.

Joe Fiordaliso, president of the CEC, said he is disappointed that after months of debate, parents in the northern end of the district will have a relatively short time to consider the city’s plan before voting.

But, he said, a zoning decision is needed so that parents of next year’s kindergarten students know where their children will be headed.

“Our commitment is to make sure that their voices aren’t left behind,” he said.

Teens Take Charge

New York City students and podcasters team up to share stories of inequity in schools

PHOTO: Brett Rawson
Teens Take Charge is a student-led organization that hopes to spark change in schools.

If you ask Sherard Stephens, a senior at Hostos-Lincoln Academy of Science in the Bronx, there are two different types of schools in New York City: There are schools where resources are plentiful and students feel challenged academically. But there are dozens of others that barely provide the basics, and those largely cater to black, Hispanic and poor students.

Stephens and other students like him think it’s time to talk about that, which is why they’ve launched Teens Take Charge. The new group, which includes students from almost every borough, wants to give young people a voice when it comes to issues they know well: what goes on in their own schools.

“It’s all about us talking about the fact that we don’t have the resources to reach the same level of success,” he said.

On Friday, Teens Take Charge will host their first event at the Bronx Library Center. Through letters, storytelling and poetry, students will tackle issues such as segregation and standardized testing. They hope their stories, along with student-moderated discussions, will spark change within their schools.

Called “To Whom it Should Concern,” the event will also feature art work and a photo booth, and will be completely led by students. But they’ve had help along the way from Handwritten, an organization that focuses on the art of writing by hand, along with The Bell, a new podcast created by Taylor McGraw and Adrian Uribarri to highlight student voices.

McGraw teaches writing at Achievement First University Prep High School in Brooklyn and Uribarri works in communications. Their podcast, which launched this month, focuses on school segregation in New York City — more than 60 years after Brown v. Board of Education, the landmark Supreme Court decision that separate schools for black and white students are inherently unequal.

The podcast was inspired by just a few lines in Chief Justice Earl Warren’s opinion in that case, in which he wrote that segregation “generates a feeling of inferiority” for minority students “that may affect their hearts and minds.”

McGraw wanted to explore the impact that segregation has on students by letting them speak for themselves.

“I want to know: How does it make them think about themselves? How does it make them think about society and their place in it? And then, what’s their response to it?” McGraw said. “So many of the other inequities that we talk about and hear about stem from segregation.”

He hopes to share clips from Friday’s event in an upcoming podcast episode.

For more information about To Whom it Should Concern, click here. To listen to the first episode of The Bell or read more about Teens Take Charge, click here.

Great Divide

Middle school acceptance letters are out. Here’s why parents say the application process leads to segregation

PHOTO: Patrick Wall
M.S. 51 in Park Slope is one of the most coveted and competitive middle schools in District 15.

Starting today, thousands of New York City students will find out where they’ll be going for middle school — setting off a sorting process that parents say leads to school segregation.

Unlike elementary schools, many middle schools in New York City don’t have set attendance zones based on a student’s address, and families have to apply to get in. Some middle schools serve as a funnel to top high schools, but those “feeder” schools receive mountains of applications for a limited number of spots.

With countless hours of research plus school visits, high-stakes student interviews and even tests, many parents find the process too stressful for elementary school-aged students. But some say there’s an even bigger problem with the application process: It’s leading to racial, economic and academic segregation. Diverse, multicultural New York City has one of the most segregated school districts in the country.

In two local school districts, parents are pushing for changes to the application process to make it more fair.

In District 2 — which includes much of Lower Manhattan, Chinatown and the Upper East Side — two parents on the local Community Education Council want to make sure their middle schools include students at a range of academic levels. That will lead to more racial and economic integration, say Shino Tanikawa and Robin Broshi.

“There’s a lot more to schools than academic achievement,” Tanikawa recently told Chalkbeat. “I want parents to start thinking about what else makes a good education.”

Academic segregation is not just a middle school problem: Chalkbeat has chronicled the extreme academic sorting that goes on in New York City high schools.

In District 15, which includes Park Slope and Sunset Park in Brooklyn, a group of parents are also lobbying for changes to middle school admissions. City Councilman Brad Lander, who has taken a leading role on addressing school segregation, recently suggested the district should require all middle schools to set aside a certain percentage of seats for low-income students.

Mayor Bill de Blasio and the city Department of Education have said they are working on a larger-scale integration plan, expected to be released by June. Advocates say the process of creating that plan has been far too private — which could hurt its chances of success.