Year In Review

Year In Review: Barriers to Entry, a look inside New York’s ‘admissions obstacle course’

PHOTO: Monica Disare
Middle school students write their names down at a high school fair in Brooklyn. The fair was organized by their school to help them overcome some of the barriers in the high school admissions process.

As students, families and educators began the arduous path to high school this year, Chalkbeat listened in.

“Every high school figures out some way to limit their population” explained Eric Nadelstern, a professor at Teacher’s College. New York’s school system consists of over 400 high schools, which are populated through the city’s high school choice process. In theory, the process allows students to rank their top 12 schools, and makes all schools available to any student regardless of where they live.

At best, the high school admissions process in New York is a labyrinth of policies and paperwork. In some schools, dozens of students compete for one seat. In other cases, schools that have “unscreened” admissions policies use surveys that could help them filter students during the application process. Even more alarming: Many schools ignore the Department of Education-mandated policy of priority enrollment for students who attend high school fairs and open houses.

Here are a few of the biggest obstacles facing low-income students in high school admissions.

PHOTO: Monica Disare
Students at the citywide high school fair at Brooklyn Technical High School.

Check out all of our 2016 Year In Review coverage here. Like what you see? Make a tax-deductible donation to Chalkbeat today to help support our work in 2017 and beyond.

Year In Review

Race Matters: How America’s schools wrestled with segregation in 2016

PHOTO: Alex Zimmerman
A classroom at Brooklyn Laboratory middle school.

In a year where race dominated the national conversation about identity and equality, American education systems grappled with issues of integration and segregation.

Across America, school systems approached segregation with varied success. Two generations of students in Indianapolis lived through the failure of busing, while a Detroit charter school finds state laws in the way of diversity. In New York, schools inch closer to diversity through revamped admissions policies.

These individual snapshots of how America’s cities struggle with issues of diversity, inclusion and equality paint a broader picture of the current state of integration efforts in the US. Learn about how our communities dealt with the issue in 2016.

PHOTO: Dylan Peers McCoy
Students eat lunch at the Oaks Academy Middle School, a private Christian school that is integrated by design.
  • Where integration works: How one inner-city Indianapolis private school is bringing kids together
    “Lunch at The Oaks Middle School on the northeast side of Indianapolis has a lot in common with meals at any school: Kids carry plastic trays stacked with sliced fruit and chicken nuggets or soft lunch bags stuffed with sandwiches and Doritos. But here, as the hum of chatter and banging of metal chairs fill the small cafeteria, kids head to tables with students from different ethnic and racial backgrounds.”

Check out all of our 2016 Year In Review coverage here. Like what you see? Make a tax-deductible donation to Chalkbeat today to help support our work in 2017 and beyond.

Year In Review

What happened when the election reached the classroom

East Bronx Academy for the Future students Carla Borbon, Justin Vargas, Jayla Cordero, and Hugo Rodriguez talk about the election. (Alex Zimmerman)

Nov. 9, 2016 was a day that will define this school year.

Millions of Americans woke up to the news that Donald Trump was their president-elect, even after pundits spent the final weeks of the campaign sure of a Trump loss. That left educators with a huge challenge: help students understand the results as they were working to understand it themselves.

Chalkbeat reporters spent the following days in classrooms across the country. They captured student protests, heartfelt writing assignments, and contentious discussions. Here are some of those key moments.

 

PHOTO: Eric Eisenstadt
The sign posted on science teacher Eric Eisenstadt’s door.

Check out all of our 2016 Year In Review coverage here. Like what you see? Make a tax-deductible donation to Chalkbeat today to help support our work in 2017 and beyond.