First Person

How I went from a restorative justice skeptic to a restorative justice believer

The author Jahira Chambers, right, working with a student.

I’ll admit it. I first wrote off the concept of restorative justice as another passing fad that would distract schools, specifically urban schools, from prioritizing academic achievement.

But last summer, my principal invited me and several colleagues to a five-day seminar to delve into restorative circles and other strategies for dealing with disruptive behavior while fostering an atmosphere of community and trust — without removing students from school. After some self-reflection and spending months putting the strategies into practice, I have become a believer in the promise of this approach.

I am a proud urban educator of young adults who are bright, compassionate, creative, and full of potential. Many of them have experienced some level of trauma that I and many of my colleagues are guilty of overlooking at times. That trauma often serves as a roadblock to their success, impacting their behavior and their ability to concentrate.

When I reflect on my students who have been suspended, many of them have been diagnosed with a learning or emotional disorder, dealt with the murder of friends and family, or have experienced homelessness — all in addition to the consequences of poverty. Removing a student from school does not address these students’ struggles.

Now, I often think of the harm that restorative justice could have prevented throughout my career.

During my first year of teaching, I witnessed an altercation that resulted in a student convulsing. It was a terrifying sight. Importantly, though, this wasn’t caused by one of those brutal student brawls the media tends to sensationalize; it was horseplay between two adolescents that inadvertently escalated.

The scene caused students to cry and gasp in horror. The other teachers in the room froze, and I was immediately outraged at the student who had caused the injury, even though he hadn’t meant to hurt anyone.

Rather than offering empathy, I supported his removal from our school community via suspension. As educators, we have become so overwhelmed trying to manage misbehavior and defiance in our schools that we’ve resorted to methods that reflect our penal system, even when they may not be appropriate to the situation. It is time for a different approach.

This year, my school has scheduled monthly restorative circles. This process humanizes students and teachers, and initiates a rapport built on empathy and compassion. While altercations and suspensions have not completely vanished, our community is stronger and we have been able to de-escalate incidents more easily.

It feels clear to me that transforming school culture requires transforming how we address student behavior. That means reallocating energy and funds to crisis intervention and conflict resolution training for educators, and trauma support for students and adults alike.

We can’t forget that the criminalization of black and Hispanic youth and students with special needs permeates school districts nationally. Despite a reduction in school suspensions in the 2015-16 school year, gaps remain. The New York Civil Liberties Union reported that students with disabilities, who make up about 19 percent of K-12 enrollment in city schools, made up 43 percent of students who had two or more suspensions or removals from class.

Our schools don’t need a surplus of NYPD officers; what we need is to invest in guidance counselors, social workers, teachers, and administrators so they have the resources and skills to manage students’ emotional and social needs.

Restorative justice practices are not a means for excusing student misbehavior or providing misleading data. On the contrary, they are a worthwhile investment in our students’ well-being and development into secure and productive citizens.

Jahira Chambers is a high school educator in Manhattan and a member of Educators for Excellence-New York. She has taught English in Thailand and also serves an adjunct professor for the CUNY College Now program.

First Person

I’m on a Community Education Council in Manhattan. Mayor de Blasio, we need to move faster on school integration

PHOTO: Patrick Wall

Mayor de Blasio,

As the mother of a fifth-grade student in a New York City public school and a member of the Community Education Council in Manhattan’s District 2, I thank you for acknowledging that our public school system does not provide equity and excellence for all of our students.

I’m writing to you understanding that the diversity plan the city released this month is a beginning, and that it will take time to integrate our schools. However, the black and Hispanic children of this city do not have decades to wait for us to make change.

I know this firsthand. For the past six years, I have been traveling out of my neighborhood to take my child to one of the city’s few remaining diverse elementary schools, located in Hell’s Kitchen. In looking at middle schools, my criteria for a school were that it matched my child’s academic interests and that it was diverse. Unfortunately, the only middle school that truly encompasses both is a long commute from our home. After commuting by subway for six years, my child wanted a school that was closer to home. I obliged.  

At my child’s middle school orientation, I saw what a segregated school looks like. The incoming class of sixth-graders includes few students of color and does not represent the diversity of our district. This middle school also lacks a diverse teaching staff and administrators. (Had I not sent my child to this school, I would only be fueling the problem, since my child was one of the few children of color admitted to the school.)

These predominately affluent and white schools are creating a new generation of students who will not know how to interact with others that come from different racial, cultural and socioeconomic backgrounds. Integrated schools, on the other hand, will provide opportunities for them to learn and work with students, teachers and school leaders that reflect the diversity of our city and the world we live in.  

There are measures we can take that will have a stronger impact in integrating our schools than what is listed in the diversity plan. I am asking that you come to the table with students, school leadership and parents that are directly affected by school segregation and consider our ideas to create schools that are more equitable for all students.  

In the words of Valerie Castile, whose family received no justice in the death of their son Philando, “The system continues to fail black people.” While she was speaking of the criminal justice system, true reform of that system begins with educating our children — who will be our society’s future police officers, politicians, legislators and judges.

Mayor de Blasio, you have the power to spur change. The students and parents of our great city are asking for your leadership in integrating our schools.

Josephine Ishmon is a member of District 2’s Community Education Council. This is her personal opinion and does not reflect that of the CEC.

First Person

I dropped out of school in Denver at 13. Here’s how I ended up back in the classroom helping kids learn.

Students at Rocky Mountain Prep in SE Denver.

Every day when I greet the young children walking into the pre-kindergarten classroom at Rocky Mountain Prep, where I’m a teaching assistant, I wonder what my middle school teachers would think if they could see me now.

My story starts out like so many others, but it has a happy ending. Why? Because a caring teacher at the school saw in me, a young mother with three kids, someone she wanted to help reach her potential.

So here I am.

Back then, no one would have guessed I would end up here. It felt like no one at the Denver middle school I attended took education seriously. The teachers who didn’t bother to learn my name didn’t take me seriously. The kids who walked in and out class whenever they wanted sure didn’t.

Even though I wanted to get an education and improve my English, after a while I started doing what my friends did.

First I’d leave a class once in a while before it was over. Then I started cutting classes. Next I’d ditch full days. Then, in seventh grade, I stopped going completely. Yes, that’s right. I dropped out of school at 13.

I guess you could say my dropping out was no big surprise. In a lot of ways, the process started when I was little. In elementary school, I was one of the thousands of Denver kids who didn’t speak much English. But I could never find the help I needed and wanted at my school.

I just felt lost, like no one there cared about me.

It was worse when I started middle school. My mom didn’t want me to go to one closest to home because it had gang problems.

I walked 45 minutes to and from school every day. I always walked. There was no school bus and public transit would have taken even longer.

Rain or snow or hot sun, there I was, walking to school by myself. I had to wake up at 5:45 a.m. to get to school on time. My mom was already at work at that hour.

When I dropped out, my mom was upset. She always worked very hard at her job in a nursing home. She had three kids and worked from 5 a.m. to 3 p.m. My dad wasn’t around.

She wasn’t going to put up with me hanging out and getting in trouble, so she sent me down to Mexico to live with my grandparents and maybe finish school there, in rural Chihuahua.

The school I went to in Mexico was much better for me. Reading, writing, math and Spanish classes were hard. But the teachers really cared. They checked in with me one-on-one every day. It was the first time I began to realize that there were adults outside my family who really cared about me. That made a big difference.

I had met a boy I liked in Mexico, and when I came back to Denver I was 16 and pregnant. My daughter Alisson was born in Denver. Eventually her father and I got married and we now have three children.

But at 16, I knew I needed to get a high school diploma if I wanted to get anywhere in the world. I attended an online high school for a while, and then a private religious school where I could take online courses. I was very proud when I graduated.

I never considered the possibility that I might go to college someday.

When Alisson turned four, I needed to find a school for her. We lived right across the street from an elementary school. But everyone told me it was not a great school. I knew how to look up information about test scores and every school I looked at near our home did not have the best scores, or at least anything close to my expectations.

I went to my mom crying. We felt stuck. I really wanted my daughter to receive a better education than I had. I wanted a high quality school that would provide the attention and support she would need. A school that would care for her education as much as I did.

Then in June, someone knocked on my door. It was a teacher from Rocky Mountain Prep charter school. They said they were opening that fall in Kepner Middle School, just a few blocks from our house. I invited her in and asked her questions for an hour. I liked what I heard.

I sent Alisson to the school and it was one of the best decisions I ever made. It’s nothing like any of the schools I attended. The teachers love the kids. Allison has learned so much.

At the end of her first year, I had a conference with her teacher, Laura. She said Alisson was an advanced student. I asked what I could do with her over the summer to make sure she stayed on top of her schoolwork.

That’s when Laura told me I should come work there because I was a natural teacher. I thought she was joking. I think my answer to her was, “Yeah, seriously.”

But she was serious. I didn’t think I had what it took. No college. No education, no experience. But she bugged me and bugged me until I said I’d apply. I did, and was hired as a teaching assistant.

I just finished my first year in the classroom. It went great. I love teaching. I love kids. I love that I get to be a part of what Rocky Mountain Prep is doing for my community in providing a strong foundation in education that I never received.

As a pre-K teaching assistant, I serve as a second educator in the classroom for our young scholars’ first experience at school. I share responsibility for helping to build their social skills and love of reading, writing, math, and science.

As a parent, I know firsthand how important those early years are for learning. I love that I also have a hand in helping so many little ones fall in love with coming to school and growing their brains.

My daughter is in first grade now. She is reading chapter books. And she’s always saying, “When I’m in college …” She has no doubt that’s what she’ll do when she finishes high school. As a mom, this makes me feel very proud.

Listening to those words coming from my own child has motivated me. I’m not always the most self-confident person, but thanks to Allison and our school, I know that’s my next step — going to college and making her as proud as she’s made me.