DIVERSITY MATTERS A passion for teaching and learning is what drew Archie Moss to a career in education. But the Memphis principal recalls how he almost left the profession when he found himself increasingly tasked as a disciplinarian. Chalkbeat

EVOLUTION OF RESEARCH Researchers are seeking to go beyond the “test score horse race” in studying charter schools and have expanded their questions to include impact on traditional school finances, segregation and long-term impact on students. Chalkbeat

MOVIN’ ON UP A Collierville school board member wins state House seat vacated by a lawmaker who resigned amid a sexual harassment investigation. The Associated Press

SEARCH OVER In a close vote, the Hamilton County school board choses Tennessee educator Bryan Johnson as its new superintendent. Times Free Press

GRADE REVIEW If the review of Shelby County Schools grading practices takes the estimated time to complete, the school district will pay about $30,000. WHBQ

FEDERAL GRANT Ten Memphis schools will split $5 million in federal grant money aimed at expanding charter schools. The Commercial Appeal

NEIGHBORHOOD SCHOOLS During a community meeting, Superintendent Shawn Joseph came to talk to Nashville parents about moving fifth grade to elementary schools. Parents had a different topic in mind. The Tennessean

FUNDING LAWSUIT City of Jackson’s attorney says county has not proven it would suffer “immediate, irreparable harm” by losing money earmarked for schools. The Jackson Sun

SCHOOL FINANCE A proposed change in property tax rate in Greene County has sparked a debate about how county and city schools are funded. The Greeneville Sun

BEYOND HIGH SCHOOL A Bristol high school receives a grant to train teachers for career and technical education courses. Bristol Herald Courier

One school year out from the launch of the Ayers Foundation post secondary education partnership with Unicoi County schools, 98 percent of the county high school’s class of 2017 is headed for higher education. Johnson City Press

FINISHING SCHOOL With two landmark community college programs underway, Gov. Bill Haslam turns his attention to ensuring students who enter actually graduate. The Tennessean