Year In Review

Embracing the elephant in the room: How educators approach race in the classroom

PHOTO: Jamaal Bowman
Jamaal Bowman (center) with national leaders in Washington, D.C.

Terence Crutcher, Philando Castile, Alton Sterling — these black men who were killed in police shootings this year prompted a difficult national conversation about race and privilege. That conversation unfolded in part in public school classrooms across the country.

Chalkbeat reporters were there as educators helped children work through complicated and often frightening emotions and ideas, while at the same grappling with their own feelings.

  • Memphis teachers share how they foster conversations about social justice in the classroom all year long
    “‘One day a student told me he felt worthless and didn’t have what it takes to do well in school. When Black Lives Matter came out, it wasn’t just about police. It’s about an entire history of society telling them they don’t matter. Society is saying it loud enough that a 10-year-old student is picking up on that narrative.'”
  •  Great teachers are experts at difficult conversations. Here’s their advice to America on talking about race.
    “‘I’m often surprised when things occur and teachers don’t say a word. They say, I teach chemistry, or what does this have to do with algebra. What exemplary teachers do is acknowledge it. Kids see these things on social media, and on the news media. And so the teachers create a space. They help them separate fact from fiction.'”
PHOTO: Andy Cross/The Denver Post
Aurora Public Schools Superintendent Rico Munn.

Check out all of our 2016 Year In Review coverage here. Like what you see? Make a tax-deductible donation to Chalkbeat today to help support our work in 2017 and beyond.

Year In Review

Race Matters: How America’s schools wrestled with segregation in 2016

PHOTO: Alex Zimmerman
A classroom at Brooklyn Laboratory middle school.

In a year where race dominated the national conversation about identity and equality, American education systems grappled with issues of integration and segregation.

Across America, school systems approached segregation with varied success. Two generations of students in Indianapolis lived through the failure of busing, while a Detroit charter school finds state laws in the way of diversity. In New York, schools inch closer to diversity through revamped admissions policies.

These individual snapshots of how America’s cities struggle with issues of diversity, inclusion and equality paint a broader picture of the current state of integration efforts in the US. Learn about how our communities dealt with the issue in 2016.

PHOTO: Dylan Peers McCoy
Students eat lunch at the Oaks Academy Middle School, a private Christian school that is integrated by design.
  • Where integration works: How one inner-city Indianapolis private school is bringing kids together
    “Lunch at The Oaks Middle School on the northeast side of Indianapolis has a lot in common with meals at any school: Kids carry plastic trays stacked with sliced fruit and chicken nuggets or soft lunch bags stuffed with sandwiches and Doritos. But here, as the hum of chatter and banging of metal chairs fill the small cafeteria, kids head to tables with students from different ethnic and racial backgrounds.”

Check out all of our 2016 Year In Review coverage here. Like what you see? Make a tax-deductible donation to Chalkbeat today to help support our work in 2017 and beyond.

Year In Review

What happened when the election reached the classroom

East Bronx Academy for the Future students Carla Borbon, Justin Vargas, Jayla Cordero, and Hugo Rodriguez talk about the election. (Alex Zimmerman)

Nov. 9, 2016 was a day that will define this school year.

Millions of Americans woke up to the news that Donald Trump was their president-elect, even after pundits spent the final weeks of the campaign sure of a Trump loss. That left educators with a huge challenge: help students understand the results as they were working to understand it themselves.

Chalkbeat reporters spent the following days in classrooms across the country. They captured student protests, heartfelt writing assignments, and contentious discussions. Here are some of those key moments.

 

PHOTO: Eric Eisenstadt
The sign posted on science teacher Eric Eisenstadt’s door.

Check out all of our 2016 Year In Review coverage here. Like what you see? Make a tax-deductible donation to Chalkbeat today to help support our work in 2017 and beyond.