united federation of teachers

the tenure track

a new face

legal showdown

I'm with him

contract sport

Funding fight

a re-evaluation

fight song

charter debate

a little push

mulgrew says

common changes

still the president

core questions

a more perfect union

paid leave

Counting Class Size

Round Two

consolidated ed

early reviews

onward to albany

campaign trailer

kumbaya

retirement incentive

evaluation redux

Counting Class Size

contract sport

Teacher talk

Back (Pay) Talk

Raising the Issue

changing sides

New York

Latest dispute with UFT could cost city $15 million in grants

UPDATE (7:30 p.m.): The deadline for the city Department of Education to submit a grant application to the State Education Department came and went with no signature from union president Michael Mulgrew. Read our update here. The Department of Education has until 5:00 p.m. to get Michael Mulgrew's signature for a grant application that could bring in as much as $15 million in funding for professional development and other teacher training resources. Today is the deadline for districts to apply to New York's Strengthening Teacher and Leader Effectiveness Grants, a $72 million pot of money from the state's $700 million in Race to the Top winnings. The grants are designed to encourage districts to develop policies to better retain and reward teachers — often through higher pay — who receive top ratings on their evaluations. Some of the grants were finalized earlier this year, but a second round totals $49 million, 30 percent of which — or $15 million — New York City qualifies for. Applications require sign-off from the teachers union, but city education officials accused United Federation of Teachers President Michael Mulgrew  on Sunday afternoon of ambushing the process to secure unrelated job benefits. They said that a final offer was rejected by union leaders on Thursday evening. "By refusing to sign the grant and inserting unrelated issues at the eleventh hour, the UFT is once again hurting the students and schools of New York City," Walcott said in a statement on Sunday. City officials said they already offered some concessions to the union as part of negotiations over the grant, including a request that the proposal allot more money that went directly to schools for professional development. But they said the union also wanted reduced paper work, a persistent gripe that both teachers and principals say have taken away from their ability to focus on instructional practice.
New York

In a polarized education climate, Bill Thompson appeals to all