Who Is In Charge

Soda levy, other tax exemption bills pass

The Senate Wednesday gave final approval to nine bills that are projected to raise about $148 million in revenue for the battered state treasury.

The measures are backed by education groups because they believe cuts to state support of K-12 education will be deeper without the additional revenue. Even with the additional money, schools are facing cuts of at least $350 million in 2010-11.

The proposal of greatest interest to the public probably is House Bill 10-1191, which would eliminate a sales tax exemption on some soft drinks and candy.

Debate over the tax package has been partisan, ideological and very prolonged in committee rooms and on the floors of the House and Senate. The Senate took most of Wednesday for final passage, which is swift and routine for most bills. Democrats have argued that the bills, which repeal various tax exemptions, are a modest imposition on business to help maintain state services.

Minority Republicans believe that raising taxes is the wrong thing to do in tough economic times and also is unconstitutional. (Democrats are relying on a 2009 Colorado Supreme Court decision about the Taxpayer’s Bill of Rights as the legal justification for changing the tax policies without voter approval.)

Some bills require House-Senate agreement on amendments, but the package basically is on its way to the desk of Gov. Bill Ritter, who proposed the package in the first place.

The governor and Democratic leaders have been pushing for enactment of the package by March 1 so that some revenue would be available for the current 2009-10 budget year as well as in 2010-11. (State budget years end June 30 and being on July 1.)

Republicans have warned that some of taxes are unenforceable and that the bills could be challenged in court.

In addition to soda and candy, the measures, House Bills 10-1189 through 1196 and 1199, change tax exemptions for direct mail advertising materials, energy used in industry, software, some online sales, food containers and pesticides, plus tax credits for alternative fuel vehicles and operating losses.

Speaking of tough issues

There’s another big bill that legislative leaders are trying to push through by March 1. That’s Senate Bill 10-001, the complex proposal to make the Public Employees’ Retirement Association solvent over the next 30 years. All teachers and many other education employees are covered by PERA.

The bill is wickedly complex, but its major element is reducing benefits for retirees, who now receive annual 3.5 percent benefit increases. (That provision often is called a “cost of living” benefit, but it isn’t tied to inflation or any other external indicator.) The bill would cut that benefit to 0 percent for one year and then basically set it as 2 percent thereafter. PERA says cutting that benefit is the major financial piece needed to set the system on the path to solvency.

The measure has the backing of the Democratic leadership, key Republicans and a coalition of employee groups. But, large numbers of individual retirees have complained loudly.

The bill has passed the Senate, and the House Finance Committee took its first cut at the measure Wednesday. The panel took testimony well into the evening (after having started at 1:30 p.m.), and then passed the bill to the House Appropriations Committee.

What’s important about March 1? That’s when the 2010 3.5 percent retiree increase is supposed to kick in. If the bill is passed and signed before that date, PERA will save big money to put in the bank, and retirees will be getting less money.

Higher ed panel having a hard time

Colorado’s colleges and universities usually get the worst of budget cuts, given that they don’t have the constitutional or other protections that shield other programs – sometimes – from cuts.

Higher education funding for this year and next is being patched together with federal stimulus funds, but the system faces cuts of more than $100 million in 2011-12.

Financial issues are one of the things being studied as part of the just-started higher education strategic planning effort (get details here).

The “sustainability” subcommittee assigned to consider finances also is supposed to come up with short-term ideas to help the higher ed system in 2011-12, ideas that can perhaps be proposed to the 2010 legislature.

Legislative leaders are holding up consideration of a proposal, Senate Bill 10-003, to see if the subcommittee comes up with anything. That bill would give colleges and universities greater flexibility in financial practices, student aid, construction and other areas. There’s also talk of legislation that would allow colleges to attain “authority” status and almost totally free them from state control. (The best example of an authority is University Hospital, which is a state entity but self-governing, and it receives no tax funding.)

The subcommittee held its second meeting Wednesday, but member were no closer to any specific proposals than they were a week ago.

“So where are we?” asked Rico Munn, director of the Department of Higher Education, as the sustainability group neared the end of its two-hour meeting.

“I don’t think we’re anywhere,” said Dick Monfort, a co-chair of the overall strategic plan effort and a member of the subcommittee.

The panel agreed to meet again Feb. 22 and discuss whether there are elements of the authority model that could be used to give colleges some short-term financial relief.

Use the Education Bill Tracker for links to bill texts and status information.

meet the candidates

These candidates are running for Detroit school board. Watch them introduce themselves.

Nine candidates are vying for two seats on Detroit's school board in November. Seven submitted photos.

One candidate tells of a childhood in a house without heat.

Another describes the two-hour commute he made to high school every day to build a future that would one day enable him to give back to Detroit.

A third says her work as a student activist inspired her to run for school board as a recent high school grad.

These candidates are among nine people vying for two seats up for grabs on Detroit’s seven-member school board on Nov. 6. That includes one incumbent and many graduates of the district.

Chalkbeat is partnering with Citizen Detroit to present a school board candidate forum Thursday, Sept. 20 from 5:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m., at IBEW Local 58, 1358 Abbott St., Detroit.

Participants will have the opportunity to meet each candidate and ask questions in a speed-dating format.

In anticipation of that event, Citizen Detroit invited each of the candidates to make a short video introducing themselves to voters. Seven candidates made videos.

Watch them here:

School safety

Report lists litany of failings over police in Chicago schools

PHOTO: Scott Olson/Getty Images
Police officers stand alongside Lake Shore Drive in August as protesters decry violence and lack of investment in African-American neighborhoods and schools

The Chicago Police Department doesn’t adequately screen and train the officers it assigns to Chicago Public Schools, and their roles in schools are poorly defined, according to a sharply critical report released today by the Office of Inspector General Joseph Ferguson.

The report lists a litany of failings, including basic administration: There is no current agreement between the police department and the district governing the deployment of school resource officers, or SROs, and neither the schools nor the police even have a current list of the officers working in schools this year.

The inspector general’s report also mentions several sets of SRO resources and best practices created and endorsed by the federal government, then notes that Chicago hasn’t adopted any of them. “CPD’s current lack of guidance and structure for SROs amplifies community concerns and underscores the high probability that students are unnecessarily becoming involved in the criminal justice system, despite the availability of alternate solutions,” says the report.

Chalkbeat reported in August about incidents in which SROs used batons and tasers on students while intervening in routine disciplinary matters.

Scrutiny of SROs is nothing new, and is part of the broader CPD consent decree brokered this week between Mayor Rahm Emanuel and Illinois Attorney General Lisa Madigan. That agreement calls for better training and vetting of SROs, as well as a clearer delineation of their roles on campuses—including a prohibition against participating in routine school discipline — beginning with the 2019-20 school year.

Read more: How the police consent decree could impact Chicago schools

But the report from Ferguson’s office says that the consent decree doesn’t go far enough. It chastises police for not pledging to include the community in the creation of its agreement with the school district, nor in the establishment of hiring guidelines; and for not creating a plan for evaluating SROs’ performance, among other recommendations. In addition, the report criticizes the police department for delaying the reforms until the 2019-20 school year. A draft of the inspector general’s report was given to the police department in early August in hopes that some of the issues could be resolved in time for the school year that began last week. The police department asked for an extension for its reply.