The Other 60 Percent

Denver’s after school initiative shows few programs in poor areas

Students who live in medium to high poverty areas of Denver may have less access to after school programming.

That’s the picture drawn by the first release of data from Denver’s after school initiative. Officials caution that the data is not complete but say that it raises issues of how city services are distributed.

“It brings up questions of are the right services being provided to the right kids,” said Lisa Piscopo, director of research and analysis for the Office of Children’s Affairs. “Poverty is not equally distributed.”

The city’s data, which includes 100 separate locations with over 700 individual programs, will be used by the administration and providers to tailor after school programming to the students it serves. It was collected by the Denver Afterschool Alliance using its online program locator, which launched last month. Program providers who wish to be included in the locator provide information on what services they provide and the cost of those services.

This effort is part of an initiative by the alliance to track after school programs around the city. City leaders hope to use that information to find gaps between the needs of students and school-aged children and the services provided.

“Gaps mean one thing to us — lost opportunity,” said Mayor Michael Hancock last week at an event on the initiative. He hopes the data provided by the city will drive organizations to modify where and how they provide services, to help the most disadvantaged populations.

The Denver Office of Children’s Affairs, which is a member of the alliance and runs the locator, collected the information provided by participants and mapped it over various factors that affect students, including poverty and English language ability.

Tracking programs

Maps provided by the Denver Office of Children’s Affairs show few programs in some neighborhoods of medium and high poverty, including central and far northeast Denver.

Notably, free programs and programs that offer food are not located those areas. In fact, many programs that would serve cash-strapped parents are in neighborhoods with low levels of poverty.

The city’s maps of where programs are located and what services they provide are available below. The city is also looking in to whether there are programs with a health component in neighborhoods with high obesity rates or in so-called “food deserts,” where few healthy food options are available.

Many cities track after school programming, according to a study commissioned by the Wallace Foundation, but less than a quarter of cities studied were undertaking the kind of comprehensive tracking and quality improvement that Denver has started on.

The Wallace Foundation says the three key components to after school coordination are: a central organizing entity, whether that’s the city or an independent nonprofit; a data system; and quality standards for participating programs.

Denver currently has the first two, with the recently launched online program locator and resulting data. The city is beginning work on quality standards although they don’t expect that work to be completed for quite a while.

Mayoral involvement

Mayor Hancock has made education a major part of his program since coming into office. As a city council member, Hancock advocated for turnaround efforts in northeast Denver, including the Green Valley Ranch campus he and mayors from Sacramento, CA and Providence, RI toured last week.

The mayor’s participation marks a break from past city leaders, both in Denver and nation-wide.

“It is pretty unusual and typically mayors don’t get involved this,” said Van Schoales of A+ Denver, a local education advocacy group. Schoales also said that it can a risky decision politically for the mayor to become involved in something he has little control over.

As for the after school program coordination, Schoales believes it is an important area for the city to focus on but that good implementation of the city’s program is key.

“There’s enormous work to be done of coordination all these things and targeting these things,” said Schoales. “How well that will be done remains to be seen.”

Enrichment gap

Here’s which Denver students lose out on summer enrichment

PHOTO: Hero Images | Getty Images

Denver’s black students, followed by Hispanic students have the lowest access to summer camps and classes while students with the best access are more likely to be white and higher-income, and have college-educated parents, according to a study released this fall.

Conducted by researchers from the University of Washington, the study builds on research that finds children in more affluent families are more likely to enjoy summer enrichment activities, such as visits to museums, historical sites, concerts or plays. Some scholars call it the “shadow education system.”

Two staff members from the Seattle-based Center on Reinventing Publication, a partner in the analysis, wrote in a blog post that there’s been much attention to achievement gaps and gaps in access to high-quality schools, but little talk of enrichment gaps.

“This research is the first step that cities can take to better understand the enrichment gaps that exist between student groups,” they wrote. “The next step is finding solutions to help fill the gaps.”

The study used data from a searchable online database of summer programs that expanded to Colorado from St. Louis with help from ReSchool Colorado, originally a project of the Donnell Kay Foundation and now a stand-alone nonprofit organization. The study is a working paper and has not been peer-reviewed. 

A look at the study’s color-coded maps shows a red streak of neighborhoods across central and northwest Denver with high access to summer programming. Blue low-access neighborhoods are clumped in northeast Denver and southwest Denver. Among them are the heavily Hispanic neighborhoods of Mar Lee, Ruby Hill and Westwood, near the city’s border with Jefferson County. At the other end of the city, Montbello and Gateway-Green Valley Ranch — and more affluent, mostly-white Stapleton — are among neighborhoods designated as having low access to summer programs and large child populations.

In addition to differences based on race and income, the researchers found that low access areas of Denver had more English language learners and that residents were less likely than in high-access neighborhoods to have been born in the U.S.

While the study found that summer programs, especially sports programs, are not evenly distributed around Denver, it revealed that parks and libraries are. The researchers recommended that policy-makers use those public spaces to more evenly distribute summer programs. It also suggested that until community leaders create those additional programs in low-access neighborhoods, families be given bus passes or ride-service vouchers to help them travel to programs outside their neighborhoods.

Clarification: This story has been updated to reflect that ReSchool Colorado did not create the searchable online database of summer programs, but helped bring it to Colorado.

#WontBeErased

Denver school board pledges to make sure LGBTQ students are ‘seen, accepted, and celebrated’

PHOTO: Andy Cross/The Denver Post
Ellie Ozbayrak, 4, sports rainbow wings at the annual PrideFest celebration at Civic Center Park June 18, 2016.

In response to reports that the Trump administration may seek to narrowly define gender as a condition determined by genitalia at birth, the Denver school board Thursday unanimously adopted a resolution in support of transgender students and staff members.

“The board, with its community members and partners, find this federal action to be cruel and harmful to our students and employees,” the resolution said. Denver Public Schools “will not allow our students, staff, and families to feel that they are being erased.”

The Trump administration has not yet made a final decision. But the threat of reversing actions taken under the Obama administration to recognize transgender Americans has prompted protests across the country, including a recent walkout at Denver’s North High School.

Several Denver students thanked the school board Thursday for the resolution, which says the board “wholeheartedly embraces DPS’s LGBTQ+ students, employees, and community members for the diversity they bring to our schools and workplaces, and strives to ensure that they are seen, accepted, and celebrated for who they truly are.”

“It is amazing to hear each and every single one of your ‘ayes,’” said a student named Skyler.

The resolution lists several ways the district supports transgender students and staff, including not requiring them “to undertake any expensive formal legal process to change their names in DPS student or personnel records” and honoring their pronoun preferences.

Read the entire resolution below.