Headlines

Weekend reads: To improve schools, New Hampshire puts students in charge

PHOTO: Marc Piscotty
Students at University Prep in Denver listen to their teacher read.
  • American schools are trying to prepare their students for an uncertain future. The solution to that problem, one writer argues, is to teach the skills of discovery. (Wired)
  • As more and more schools adopt project-based learning, a teacher predicts the future of the teaching technique. (Edutopia)
  • The news business may or may not be in a death spiral, but online coverage of education (at outlets like Chalkbeat!) is having a big moment. (Education Next)
  • A guide to split-second decision-making in the classroom from a New York charter school principal. (Achievement First)
  • A history of Charles B.J. Snyder, the man who used architecture to bring open play areas and sunlight to thousands of New York City schoolchildren. (Narratively)
  • Can teaching media literacy be used to both engage students and boost test scores? One New York City program says yes. (The Lamp)
  • After cutting many counselor and other social service positions, Philadelphia’s school district is training teachers and other staff to be more able to help with students’ mental and behavioral health issues. (The Notebook)
  • When a New Hampshire school found itself struggling with low test scores, it made the bold decision to put kids in charge of the classroom. (Atlantic)
  • A pilot program in the Granite State could prove to be the compromise between high-stakes accountability and teacher autonomy — and it has Arne Duncan’s attention. (EdWeek)
  • As the 10 year anniversary of Hurricane Katrina approaches, there is an ongoing debate about the role of the Recovery School District in New Orleans. (Hechinger Report)
  • Teachers may choose a better starting salary than a more generous pension. (EdWeek)

reading list

Weekend Reads: ‘Love and love hard,’ a KIPP Tulsa teacher tells us all

PHOTO: Caroline Bauman
  • New Haven’s schools chief has fallen out of favor after seven years there, and now he’s looking to leave. (N.H. Independent)
  • The KIPP charter network urged its schools to act after Terence Crutcher, a KIPP dad, was killed by police in Tulsa. (Chalkbeat)
  • What that action looked like at KIPP Tulsa College Prep, where at least 10 students are related to Crutcher. (Tulsa World)
  • A teacher at the school went viral after sharing her experiences talking to students — and her advice to “love and love hard.” (Facebook)
  • Great teachers are experts at having hard conversations. Here’s their advice to America. (Chalkbeat)
  • One of Nevada’s wealthiest women is also the state’s glamorous board of education president. (Pacific Standard)
  • Two seasoned education policy wonks are leading Donald Trump’s education transition planning. (Politics K-12)
  • Why is Tennessee’s first single-sex charter school thriving? Not for the reason you might think. (The Atlantic)
  • Efforts are underway to improve black students’ experience at a diverse school where they still come out behind. (Bloomberg)

reading list

Weekend Reads: Why Texas stopped students with disabilities from getting the help they need

PHOTO: Alan Petersime
  • A story about school choice in Philadelphia didn’t mention race drew criticism from Nikole Hannah-Jones (and others). (Billy Penn)
  • What KIPP did after it realized how many graduates were dropping out of college has changed the conversation about success. (Chalkbeat)
  • Texas has systematically prevented children with disabilities from getting the help they’re legally entitled to, according to a new investigation. (Houston Chronicle)
  • An exit interview with Kaya Henderson, the chief who took D.C. schools from “dead” to cracking down on families faking addresses to get in. (Scholastic)
  • Watch this video to get up speed on the Common Core standards and why they’re still under fire. (EdWeek)
  • A coach speaks directly, and encouragingly, to a student whose teacher sees him as a problem. (Education Post)
  • What Donald Trump is really saying when he says he’d create home-school vouchers for poor kids. (Slate)
  • A new study found that the greatest determinant of police surveillance in schools is the presence of students of color. (The Atlantic)
  • Catch up on the last year — and century — in Detroit schools, one of the few places where police seem to be visible in that city. (Harpers)
  • Among the details in a lawsuit challenging the quality of education in Detroit: condoms on the floor and teachers without training. (Chalkbeat)