• Why doesn’t anybody want to be a teacher anymore? (NPR)
  • Standardized tests aren’t great, but the fix is more data, not less. (Wired)
  • Study shows how education advocacy groups influence lawmaking in 3 Republican states. (Education Week)
  • One of America’s top testing tutors says no one should take the SAT in 2016. (Yahoo Finance)
  • A parent: Public school will teach my child things a private school couldn’t. (Salon)
  • On digital textbooks: “Technology should be a means, not an end. In this country, it’s becoming an end.” (The Atlantic)
  • Just what should be taught in sex education courses isn’t clear in a diverse and sometimes divided society. (The Atlantic)
  • An epic senior prank puts a bucket in the principal’s hands and leaves him in a puddle of tears. (Wichita Eagle)
  • One Chicago school is trying to remove barriers to college by making sure that all of its students fill out the FAFSA. (KUNC)
  • Researchers examine the affect of having an incarcerated parent on children. (Education Week)
  • A few takes on how to make sure students are getting high-quality educations. (New York Times)
  • Schools on military bases hope Common Core(ish) standards will help ease transitions for a very mobile group of students. (Hechinger Report)
  • Oklahoma was concerned the Advanced Placement U.S. History curriculum focuses too much on “what’s bad about America.” The New Yorker has a proposed replacement curriculum. (New Yorker)
  • The Peace Corps and Michelle Obama are partnering on an initiative to encourage education for girls around the world. (NPR)