roundup

Weekend Reads: The three big strategies driving the United State’s rising graduation rates

  • Graduation rates have been rising steadily since 2002. A team of reporters around the country go deep on the strategies schools have been using to drive that increase. (NPR Ed)
  • The national movement to extend the school day with after-school programs is prompting school districts and community organizations to share data and strategies in new ways. (EdWeek)
  • One in four black young people are neither in school nor employed in nine American cities featured in a new report. (The Atlantic)
  • Don’t miss WNYC’s series on a transgender third grader attending a Brooklyn public school. (SchoolBook)
  • A group of students is petitioning the College Board to let them retake the SAT for free after an error caused scores from one section of the test to be thrown out. (Answer Sheet)
  • Here’s what test-taking looks like in Baltimore, India, Pakistan, South Korea and more places around the world. (The Atlantic)
  • And in China, officials are using drones to identify students who cheat on the country’s college entrance examination. (CBS News)
  • Renovations at an Oklahoma school uncovered 100-year-old chalkboard drawings. (NewsOK)
  • A fellow at the Progressive Policy Institute takes a deep look at the changes that have reshaped New Orleans schools since Hurricane Katrina. (Washington Monthly)
  • Michael Petrilli used a linguistic algorithm to analyze the tweets of prominent education policy officials, teachers and writers and found a lot of upbeat, analytic people. (Education Next)
  • Even though college tuition in Norway is completely free, the children of parents without a college degree are just as unlikely to attend as American children of parents who didn’t go. (Hechinger Report)
  • The Mexican government has reinstated its new teacher evaluation plan after the country’s June 7 elections, which the teachers union had threatened to disrupt, were carried out smoothly. (EdWeek)
  • The New York teenager who spent more three years on Riker’s Island, much of it in solitary confinement, waiting on a trial that never happened committed suicide last week after many struggles returning to school and society since his release. (New Yorker)

reading list

Weekend Reads: ‘Love and love hard,’ a KIPP Tulsa teacher tells us all

PHOTO: Caroline Bauman
  • New Haven’s schools chief has fallen out of favor after seven years there, and now he’s looking to leave. (N.H. Independent)
  • The KIPP charter network urged its schools to act after Terence Crutcher, a KIPP dad, was killed by police in Tulsa. (Chalkbeat)
  • What that action looked like at KIPP Tulsa College Prep, where at least 10 students are related to Crutcher. (Tulsa World)
  • A teacher at the school went viral after sharing her experiences talking to students — and her advice to “love and love hard.” (Facebook)
  • Great teachers are experts at having hard conversations. Here’s their advice to America. (Chalkbeat)
  • One of Nevada’s wealthiest women is also the state’s glamorous board of education president. (Pacific Standard)
  • Two seasoned education policy wonks are leading Donald Trump’s education transition planning. (Politics K-12)
  • Why is Tennessee’s first single-sex charter school thriving? Not for the reason you might think. (The Atlantic)
  • Efforts are underway to improve black students’ experience at a diverse school where they still come out behind. (Bloomberg)

reading list

Weekend Reads: Why Texas stopped students with disabilities from getting the help they need

PHOTO: Alan Petersime
  • A story about school choice in Philadelphia didn’t mention race drew criticism from Nikole Hannah-Jones (and others). (Billy Penn)
  • What KIPP did after it realized how many graduates were dropping out of college has changed the conversation about success. (Chalkbeat)
  • Texas has systematically prevented children with disabilities from getting the help they’re legally entitled to, according to a new investigation. (Houston Chronicle)
  • An exit interview with Kaya Henderson, the chief who took D.C. schools from “dead” to cracking down on families faking addresses to get in. (Scholastic)
  • Watch this video to get up speed on the Common Core standards and why they’re still under fire. (EdWeek)
  • A coach speaks directly, and encouragingly, to a student whose teacher sees him as a problem. (Education Post)
  • What Donald Trump is really saying when he says he’d create home-school vouchers for poor kids. (Slate)
  • A new study found that the greatest determinant of police surveillance in schools is the presence of students of color. (The Atlantic)
  • Catch up on the last year — and century — in Detroit schools, one of the few places where police seem to be visible in that city. (Harpers)
  • Among the details in a lawsuit challenging the quality of education in Detroit: condoms on the floor and teachers without training. (Chalkbeat)