status quo holds

Lawmakers torpedo yet another bid to change teacher evaluations

Rep. Jeni Arndt (left) and teacher Russ Brown listened to committee questions during the hearing on Arndt’s bill.

Lawmakers killed a bill Monday that would have allowed school districts to scale back evaluations of teachers who’ve earned an arduous national certification, another blow to efforts to remake Colorado’s educator evaluation system.

The House Education Committee killed the bill 7-4 — a vote that crossed party lines — after a motion to move the bill forward failed. The second vote means the legislation is dead for this legislative session.

The defeat of House Bill 16-1121 in the Democratic-controlled House came just four days after the Education Committee in the Republican-controlled Senate defeated a much more sweeping proposal that would have shaken up how teachers are evaluated.

That legislation would have eliminated the requirement that districts base at least half of a principal or teacher’s annual evaluation on student academic growth, a centerpiece of a landmark 2010 educator effectiveness law.

The House bill’s scope was much narrower, covering teachers who have earned National Board Certification status. Only about 900 of Colorado’s roughly 56,000 teachers have earned that qualification, which involves passing a rigorous program of exams and demonstrations of teaching skills. A private group, the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards, offers the certification.

The bill would have allowed, but not required, districts to exempt those teachers from required annual evaluations. Teachers instead would have faced evaluations at least every three years.

The bill was sponsored by Rep. Jeni Arndt, D-Fort Collins. But the idea was the brainchild of Russ Brown, a history and social studies teacher at Poudre High School in Fort Collins.

He told the committee that he hoped creating an exception for board certified teachers who inspire others to seek that credential.

“The key to saving American education is that we must inspire good teachers,” he said.

Brown said the idea came to him three years ago. He said  he hasn’t sought certification to avoid the impression that he was seeking a personal advantage.

Arndt acknowledged that “this bill touches on a sensitive topic. It touches on Senate Bill 191,” referring to the 2010 law that created the current evaluation system.

She described the bill as a way to recognize top teachers.

“Quite frankly,” Arndt said, “it’s a pro-teacher bill.”

From the start of three hours of testimony and discussion, committee members of both parties raised many questions. Major themes included whether to tinker with evaluation before the system is fully put into practice, the wisdom of valuing board certification over measurable results from student growth data, and whether the bill would create “inequities” among teachers.

Lobbyists from three education advocacy groups — the Colorado Children’s Campaign, Colorado Succeeds and Stand for Children — testified strongly against the bill. Another major reform group, Democrats for Education Reform, was neutral, Arndt said.

But other witnesses from the Poudre school district — as well as board certified teachers and representatives of the Colorado Education Association, the state’s largest teachers union — urged the committee to pass the bill.

In closing statements before the vote, some committee members clearly were torn.

“I’m really struggling with this one,” said Rep. Dominick Moreno, D-Commerce City.

With the defeat of the House bill, no other pending bills would alter the state system, which requires that principals and teachers be evaluated half on their professional practice and half on student academic growth.

Only two other evaluation-related bills are currently pending at the Capitol:

House Bill 16-1016 – Provides state help to districts to develop additional measures of student growth. It’s scheduled to be heard by House Education on Feb. 29. While there isn’t a partisan or ideological divide over this bill, its current $20 million price tag is a big problem in a tight-budget session.

House Bill 16-1099 – Repeals a provision that requires mutual consent of a teacher and a principal for placement in a school and creates additional protections for teachers who aren’t placed. It’s on House Education’s March 21 calendar. It’s not expected to survive.

negotiations

Aurora school board reverses course, accepts finding that district should have negotiated bonuses with union

Students in a math class at Aurora Central High School in April 2017. (Photo by Yesenia Robles, Chalkbeat)

Following weeks of criticism, the Aurora school board on Tuesday reversed course and accepted an arbitrator’s finding that a pilot bonus system violated the district’s agreement with the teachers union.

The Aurora school district rolled out an experiment last year to offer bonuses to some teachers and other staff in hard-to-fill positions, such as psychologists, nurses and speech language pathologists.

The teachers union argued that the plan should have been negotiated first. An arbitrator agreed and issued a report recommending that the pilot program stop immediately and that the district negotiate any future offerings. The union and school board are set to start negotiations next month about how to change teacher pay, using new money voters approved in November.

When school board members first considered the arbitrator’s report last month, they declined to accept the findings, which were not binding. That raised concerns for union members that the district might implement bonuses again without first negotiating them.

Tuesday’s new resolution, approved on a 5-1 vote, accepted the full arbitrator’s report and its recommendations. Board member Monica Colbert voted against the motion, and board member Kevin Cox was absent.

Back in January 2018, school board members approved a budget amendment that included $1.8 million to create the pilot for incentivizing hard-to-fill positions. On Tuesday, board member Cathy Wildman said she thought through the budget vote, the school board may have allowed the district to create that incentive program, even though the board now accepts the finding that they should have worked with union before trying this experiment.

“It was a board decision at that time to spend that amount on hard-to-fill positions,” Wildman said.

Board president Marques Ivey said he was not initially convinced by the arbitrator’s position, but said that he later read more and felt he could change his vote based on having more information.

Last month, the Aurora school board discussed the report with its attorney in a closed-door executive session. When the board met in public afterward, it chose not to uphold the entire report, saying that the board could not “come to an agreement.” Instead board members voted on a resolution that asked the school district to negotiate any future “long-term” incentive programs.

Union president Bruce Wilcox called the resolution “poorly worded” and slammed the board for not having the discussion in public, calling it a “backroom deal.” Several other teachers also spoke to the board earlier this month, reminding the newest board members’ of their campaign promises to increase transparency.

Board members responded by saying that they did not hold an official vote; rather the board was only deciding how to proceed in public. Colorado law prohibits schools boards from taking positions, or votes, in private.

The board on Tuesday also pushed the district to provide more detailed information about the results of the pilot and survey results that tried to quantify how it affected teachers deciding to work in Aurora.



story slam

The state of teacher pay in Indiana: Hear true stories told by local educators

It’s time to hear directly from educators about the state of teacher pay in Indiana.

Join us for another Teacher Story Slam, co-hosted by the Eiteljorg Museum of American Indians and Western Art, Chalkbeat Indiana, and Teachers Lounge Indy. Teacher salaries are the hot topic in education these days, in Indiana and across the country. Hear from Indianapolis-area teachers who will tell true stories about how they live on a teacher’s salary.

Over the past two years, Chalkbeat has brought readers personal stories from the teachers, students, and leaders of Indianapolis through our occasional series, What’s Your Education Story? Some of our favorites were told live during teacher story slams hosted by Teachers Lounge Indy.

Those stories include one teacher’s brutally honest reflection on the first year of teaching and another teacher’s uphill battle to win the trust of her most skeptical student.

Event details

The event will be held from 6-8 p.m. on Friday, March 15, at Clowes Court at the Eiteljorg, 500 W Washington St. in Indianapolis. It is free and open to the public — please RSVP.

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