Smart choices

Liking school is good for teens’ sexual health, report finds

PHOTO: Stephanie Snyder

Students who like school and care about graduating make better choices about sex, according to a new report from the advocacy group Colorado Youth Matter.

The report, released last week, revealed that students with positive attitudes about school have intercourse with fewer partners and use birth control more often.

Lisa Olcese, executive director of Colorado Youth Matter, said it was the report’s most compelling finding and a call to action for educators.

It speaks “to the importance of engaging the whole student,” she said. “Connectedness at school is a protective factor, so how does each school community think about that?”

The report, which comes on the heels of a New York Times story highlighting Colorado’s surprising success in reducing teen pregnancy, fleshes out state trends in teen sexual activity and pregnancy rates.

Among the report’s other findings:

  • Teens who have teachers, relatives or other adults with whom they feel comfortable discussing sensitive issues are more likely to delay sexual intercourse, have fewer sexual partners and use condoms.
  • Latina teens have the highest birth rate among racial and ethnic groups in Colorado, but have also experienced the greatest decline—71 percent—since 2000.
  • A decade ago, Denver and Adams County were among the 10 Colorado counties with the highest teen birth rates. Both have now dropped out of the top 10—closely tracking statewide reductions that observers credit to an initiative to provide long-acting contraceptives to teens and poor women.
  • The counties with the highest teen birth rates are now all rural, though all have much lower rates than the top 10 counties a decade ago.
  • Colorado’s rate of HIV infection among teens increased from 2013 to 2014—most significantly in Denver—but it’s still below national levels.
  • Lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender youth are at much higher risk of being bullied or sexually assaulted at school.

The “State of Adolescent Health in Colorado” report is available for $8 from Colorado Youth Matter.

How are you feeling?

With plan to focus on teen health, Adams 12 school district opens new clinic

PHOTO: Jasleen_kaur/Creative Commons

The Adams 12 school district, Colorado’s sixth-largest, will open its first school-based health clinic this fall at Thornton High School.

The new clinic will offer routine physicals, sick care and mental health counseling to the 1,675 students at Thornton High as well as another 1,000 students who take classes at the district’s career and technical education center on the same campus.

By providing a convenient source of health care, particularly for low-income students, advocates say school-based health centers help prevent and address health problems that can impede learning.

Statewide, the number of school-based health centers has grown over the last decade — from 40 in 2007 to 59 this fall.

Despite the overall upward trend, not all school-based health centers survive. For example, the clinic at Jefferson Junior-Senior High School, a high poverty school in the Jeffco district, closed its doors last spring.

A district official there said the nonprofit organization providing the health services, which were available to Jefferson students and other local residents, decided to depart because district security logistics made it difficult to keep the clinic open during evening and weekend hours.

In Adams 12, planning for the new clinic began in 2015. A district committee chose Thornton High to house the health center because of the high level of poverty in that area and because the campus, which also houses the Bollman Technical Education Center, serves the largest number of high school students in the district.

District spokesman Kevin Denke said the decision to focus on a teenage population stems from the fact that adolescents tend to see doctors less often than younger students and may be starting to engage in risky behaviors, such as sexual activity, alcohol use or drug use.

The neighboring Boulder Valley school district also has a school-based health clinic in the works, though it’s not expected to open until the fall of 2019. That clinic, the district’s first, will be located at the Arapahoe Campus, which houses Arapahoe Ridge High School and the district’s career and technical education center.

District officials said the clinic was originally slated to open earlier, but the launch was pushed back to align with a planned remodel of the career and technical education space.

In the meantime, the district will expand a dental care program that’s gradually ramped up at the Arapahoe Campus. Begun four years ago as a basic screening program that referred kids with cavities and other problems to area dentists, the program last year provided cleanings, fluoride treatments and sealants to 42 students at Arapahoe Ridge and two other district high schools.

This year, the program will offer the same services, plus treatment for minor cavities, to students from all district high schools. The goal is to serve 250 students by the end of the year.

Fighting hunger

No more cheese sandwiches: Denver restores hot lunches for students in debt

Students at Denver's Fairmont ECE-8 have a choice of fruits and vegetables for lunch. (Denver Post file photo)

Denver students will start the year off with lunch debts paid off and a new promise that falling behind on lunch payments will not mean a cold “alternative” meal.

The district announced the change this week.

“We will feed every kid, every day,” Superintendent Tom Boasberg wrote. “We know hungry kids aren’t the best learners.”

In some districts, including DPS, students who fall behind on lunch payments may be given alternative meals such as a cheese sandwich, or graham crackers and milk.

Boasberg said all kids will get regular hot-lunch options while payment issues are resolved and the district works on a long-term strategy.

In the last school year, Denver students had accumulated a balance of more than $13,000. The debt would be higher if some schools had not set aside money to help students.

According to the district, schools paid for more than 37,700 meals during the 2016-17 year.

The district said that donations raised by students through a nonprofit called KidsGiving365, and by Shift Workspaces, founded by Grant Barnhill, a parent of an incoming DPS student, will cover all the outstanding lunch debt of students in the district.

In DPS, all students receive free breakfast. Students who qualify for free lunch based on family income do not make payments and do not accrue debt.

For 2017-18, a family of four must earn less than $31,980 to qualify for free lunch, or less than $45,510 to qualify for a reduced price lunch.

The announcement from DPS reminds families that the application for free or discounted lunch can be submitted throughout the year, and that students are eligible regardless of immigration status.