Difficult choice

Denver schools chief backs community panel’s pick to replace closing school

PHOTO: Sara Gips Goodall/McGlone
McGlone principal Sara Gips Goodall with some of her students.

The Denver Public Schools superintendent is backing a community group’s recommendation that leaders of McGlone Academy, a once-struggling school that has shown improvement, take over nearby Amesse Elementary School, which is slated to be closed for poor performance.

Superintendent Tom Boasberg is advancing the recommendation despite concerns about low participation by parents on the “community review board” for Amesse. Review boards were created this year to give parents and community members a more central role in the difficult and emotional process of choosing new schools to replace closing ones.

“To try and do something right the first time is hard,” Boasberg told the Denver school board at a meeting Monday. But he added that “having watched the processes and seeing the quality and integrity of the processes, I am endorsing the community review board recommendations.”

The Denver school board has the final say. It is expected to vote June 19.

None of the eight parents and family members chosen to serve on the Amesse review board attended its final meeting, at which four community members and a professional reviewer voted 3-2 to recommend McGlone’s plan to “restart” the school. One parent was asked to leave the board, and others did not show up for meetings, according to the group’s final report.

That dearth of parent involvement was a limitation, two members of the group told the Denver school board Monday. However, they said parents’ voices were heard throughout the process and that the remaining members weighed the desires of those parents heavily.

Local charter network STRIVE Prep also applied to restart Amesse. The review board members noted that both applications were strong — and STRIVE Prep scored better on DPS’s school rating system that gives a large amount of weight to performance on state tests.

But review board members were swayed by McGlone’s experience with a specific court-ordered program to teach English language learners that must also be used at Amesse, its success turning around an entire elementary school all at once and its extensive community engagement. Its plan, written with input from Amesse educators and parents, calls for a partnership between the two schools that would be known as the Montbello Children’s Network. Both schools are located in the Montbello neighborhood in far northeast Denver.

“We truly do believe we can be stronger together,” said McGlone principal Sara Gips Goodall.

STRIVE operates 11 schools in the city, including one elementary. STRIVE Prep Ruby Hill does not yet serve students in all grades; it currently has kindergarten through third grade with plans to add fourth and fifth. It also does not use the same program to teach English language learners. However, another STRIVE school — STRIVE Prep Kepner — does use the program. That school is a restart of a middle school that was closed for low performance.

On Monday, STRIVE CEO and founder Chris Gibbons emphasized to the school board the charter network’s experience and willingness to restart struggling schools. He pointed out the closeness of the community review board vote and said that of the two applicants, he believes STRIVE has the strongest academic track record, which is a priority for the district.

“We believe the recommendation merits a very thorough review from the (Denver school) board, because it was so close,” Gibbons said after the meeting.

In his remarks to the school board, Boasberg praised STRIVE, calling it one of the finest school organizations in the country and a leader in serving all types of students.

“The fact that the choice at Amesse was so difficult is wonderful,” he said.

Boasberg is also advancing the recommendation of a separate community review board tasked with vetting programs to take over struggling Greenlee Elementary in west Denver. That board had only one application to consider: the Center for Talent Development at Greenlee, submitted by the current principal and seeking to continue recent gains made under his leadership.

The board “overwhelmingly” recommended it, according to its final report.

pick a school

Denver Public Schools making changes to choice process meant to benefit low-income parents

PHOTO: Karl Gehring/Denver Post
A Lincoln Elementary student practices her writing skills in this 2008 file photo.

Denver Public Schools is making changes to its nationally recognized school choice system, in part to make it easier for low-income parents to navigate and to assuage fears of undocumented families wary of providing personal information given the national political climate.

The district plans to roll out a new, mobile-friendly school information website, as well as eliminate a requirement that families show “proof papers” to participate in the choice process.

This year will be the seventh that DPS has used a unified enrollment system for all of its schools, including district-run, innovation and charter schools. Families fill out a form listing their top five school choices. The district especially encourages families with kids moving into so-called transition grades — kindergarten, 6th and 9th grades — to fill out a form.

If they don’t, students will be assigned to their boundary school or to a school in their enrollment zone, which is essentially a bigger boundary that includes several schools.

District leaders believe that if families are informed about their choices and can enroll their students in the schools that are the best fit, those students will be more successful.

But not all families are participating. Last school year, district statistics show 87 percent of kindergarteners, 87 percent of sixth-graders and 73 percent of ninth-graders filled out the form. Participation has historically been lower among low-income families than wealthier families.

Remaining barriers include a low awareness of how to research different school options, district officials said. The fact that the choice process takes place in January, seven months before the next school year starts in August, also makes picking a school difficult for families experiencing housing insecurity who may not know where they’ll be living in the fall, officials said.

To make it more accessible, the district is planning to change three things about the upcoming school choice process, which will determine where students enroll in 2018-19. The changes were revealed at a school board work session Monday night by Brian Eschbacher, executive director of enrollment and planning for DPS. They are:

1. Moving the choice process from January to February

In past years, the district has given families a weeks-long window in January to fill out their school choice forms. That means families must research their options — and schools must ramp up their recruiting — in December, a busy time of year filled with holidays and travel.

Plus, asking families to make school choices so far in advance of the next school year can be hard for those who don’t have stable housing or easy access to transportation, Eschbacher said.

To remedy both issues, the district is pushing the choice window back this year. It will open on February 1, and families will have until February 28 to turn in their forms.

Eschbacher said the district also hopes to have the results back sooner. He said his team is aiming to tell families their school assignments in three weeks this year instead of six.

2. A new user-friendly, mobile-friendly school search tool

The district plans to debut a new online tool in late October or early November that will allow families to more easily find and evaluate DPS schools. The tool, called School Finder, is made by a California company called SchoolMint and is already being used by several large urban districts, including those in Oakland, Calif., Chicago and Camden, N.J.

The current DPS online tool is not mobile-friendly, which Eschbacher said presents a problem for families whose only internet access is through their smartphones. School Finder “looks slick” on a smartphone, Eschbacher said, and will allow families to look up a school’s rating, test scores, information about the programs it offers and even take a virtual tour.

The district hosted several forums with DPS school secretaries, community groups and non-English-speaking parents to get their thoughts on what information is most important to families choosing a school. Eschbacher said district staff are committed to providing that information to families free of jargon and in several languages.

“We’re trying to translate that into parent-speak, not buzzword-y speak,” he said.

Grants from the Walton Family Foundation and the Michael & Susan Dell Foundation are paying for the project, Eschbacher said. (The Walton Family Foundation also supports Chalkbeat.)

3. Eliminating “proof paperwork” as a requirement to participate in school choice

To participate in the process, the families of the thousands of students who are new to DPS each year have in the past been required to provide proof of their address, such as a utility bill, and proof of their child’s birthdate, such as a birth certificate.

But Eschbacher said district officials are worried that at a time when President Trump has taken a hard line on immigration enforcement, requiring proof paperwork will dissuade undocumented families from participating because they fear it will prompt government action.

According to Eschbacher, internal DPS research suggests between 6,000 and 8,000 of the district’s 92,000 students are undocumented. District leaders have been vocal about protecting those students. The school board passed a resolution in February assuring the district would do everything “in its lawful power” to protect students’ confidential information and ensure “students’ learning environments are not disrupted” by immigration enforcement actions.

This year, families who want to participate in choice only will have to tell DPS their child’s name, address and birthdate, Eschbacher said. Families eventually will have to produce proof paperwork but not until they register their children for school in the late summer, “when there is a longer window available and more community resources to help,” according to the board presentation.

School board members on Monday praised the changes, and lauded Eschbacher and his staff for proposing improvements to a system that’s earned national praise (and also criticism).

“To rethink the structure of what we’ve done in the past is a breakthrough and it will mean a lot to our families,” said school board member Happy Haynes.

Knock knock

Denver’s ambitious home visit program works to build bridges between parents and teachers

PHOTO: Melanie Asmar
Naylin Lopez, 6, talks with her teacher, Annemarie Minor, in her home.

Six-year-old Naylin Lopez hopped up on the couch in her family’s living room. It was an hour after school and her first-grade teacher was visiting. As Naylin arranged her Barbies in a neat row, smoothing their dresses and stroking their hair, her teacher turned to her.

“Naylin, I have a question for you,” said Annemarie Minor, her teacher at Munroe Elementary in southwest Denver. “What would you like to do when you grow up?”

Naylin flashed a smile full of baby teeth. “I want my mom to pay me 20 bucks,” she said.

Naylin’s mother, Minor and the two other teachers who’d accompanied her on the visit laughed.

With a little more prodding, Naylin said she wants to be a teacher. Her 7-year-old cousin, Aaliyah, a second-grader who was in Minor’s class last year, said she wants to work in a restaurant. She excitedly told the teachers about how she learned to cut tomatoes in her cooking class and how she’s growing a pumpkin plant outside.

The Thursday afternoon visit was one of hundreds conducted by Denver Public Schools teachers in the weeks since school started. The aim of the growing Parent Teacher Home Visit Program is to build relationships between educators and families in the hopes those bonds will benefit students. The 92,000-student district has an ambitious goal this year: 13,000 visits.

Modeled after a program in Sacramento, Calif., Denver’s home visit program is now the second-biggest in the country behind only D.C. Public Schools, according to the district. Last year, Denver educators conducted 11,120 visits, said program manager Yoni Geffen.

That’s magnitudes more than when Tom Boasberg became superintendent in 2009. He recalled getting an email from a teacher at Fairview Elementary inviting him to come along on a home visit. Fairview, which is located in the low-income Sun Valley neighborhood on the city’s west side, was the only DPS school doing them at the time, Boasberg said.

“I remember saying, ‘That sounds great, fantastic. I’ll send you an email (to find a time),’” Boasberg said. “A month later, he sent me an email saying, ‘Haven’t heard back from you, but you really ought to come check out this home visit program.’ I was so underwater with everything else I had to do. But given his enthusiasm, I was like, ‘I gotta do it.’”

So Boasberg tagged along as the teacher visited the home of a refugee student.

“It was striking to me how much impact it had on both the parents and the teacher,” Boasberg said. “Each of them came in wanting to have a strong partnership with the other.”

In the years since, the program has grown to include 124 district-run elementary, middle and high schools. Teachers are paid $20 per visit, while paraprofessionals are paid $15. A district spokeswoman said DPS spent just under $629,000 on the program last year.

Boasberg said it’s money well spent. Research has shown strong parent engagement can lead to increased student success. Denver is one of four school districts nationwide participating in a study to better understand the effects of home visits and the potential for them to disrupt biases.

The protocol of the DPS home visits is simple: Teachers ask families about their hopes and dreams for their students. It’s a conversation devoid of test scores, discipline data, grades and spreadsheets, and one that Boasberg describes as “very powerful.”

When Maggie Latorre, an art teacher at Munroe who visited Naylin’s home alongside Minor, asked Naylin’s mother her hopes for Naylin and Aaliyah, she was quick to answer.

“For them to be successful and pick a career they enjoy,” Sonia Estrada said.

As the visit wrapped up, the teachers stood and thanked Estrada for her time. They took a selfie with Naylin and Aaliyah, and waved goodbye to the family’s pet turtle, Buddy. The girls followed their teachers out to the porch, where Aaliyah pointed out her pumpkin plant growing in a pot.

Minor and Latorre said the visits are crucial for building trust with families and learning about their students. For instance, Minor said her first-graders would be doing a writing lesson the next day. If Naylin is stumped on what to write about, the teacher will have a suggestion ready: Buddy.

“It really changes the dynamic at school,” says Latorre, a home visit enthusiast who went on more than 160 visits last year and had another lined up Thursday afternoon two doors down.

“The kids feel special that my teacher cares enough to visit me after school,” Minor said.

“It spreads like wildfire,” Latorre added. “They all want to be next.”