losing ground

Study: Michigan reading scores ‘going in the wrong direction’ despite major state investment in helping young children read

PHOTO: Denver Post file

An alarming new report comparing Michigan students to their peers across the country found that not only are Michigan students lagging behind, they’re quickly losing ground.

The report from the non-partisan research and advocacy organization, Education Trust-Midwest, takes advantage of the fact that, for the last three years, Michigan students have been taking a state exam, the M-STEP, that’s easily comparable to the exams given in 12 other states.

That means that for the first time, it’s easy to line Michigan test scores up against scores from other states using results from all test-takers in grades 3-8. Previously, national comparisons have only been available through a national exam that tests a sample of students across the country in grades 4, 8 and 12.  

Among findings: The percentage of third-graders who are proficient on the state’s English Language Arts exam dropped by nearly 6 percentage points in Michigan over the last three years while scores in other states climbed or stayed relatively flat in the same period.

“Our scores are going in the wrong direction,” said Brian Gutman, Education Trust-Midwest’s director of external relations.

Scores have dropped in Michigan despite what Education Trust-Midwest says was a $77 million increase in spending on improving literacy in early grades.

The extra money went for things like reading coaches and longer class periods but Gutman asserts that the money hasn’t been used effectively.

“Focusing on early literacy makes a lot of sense,” he said. “It’s a strong foundation that students need in order to excel in school.”

But, he said, “What exactly are we doing? How are we implementing strategies to improve early literacy? Are they truly based on best practices?”

Gutman urged state officials to be more proactive about finding out how money is being spent and more assertive about directing it toward proven programs.

That becomes even more crucial, he said, now that a new state law is raising the stakes for students. Starting in 2020, most third-graders will not be allowed to advance to the fourth grade unless they can pass the state’s English Language Arts exam.

Read the full report here:

Top Ten for Education: Not by Chance. Education Trust Midwest – March 2016 by The Education Trust Midwest on Scribd

Payday coming soon

Pension paybacks for Detroit district employees may show up in March  

Thousands of Detroit district school employees may reap the benefits of a lawsuit over pension funding as soon as March.

School employees who worked for Detroit’s main district between 2010 and 2011 can expect refund checks in their mailboxes soon, district leaders say, but making sure the money ends up in the right place will be difficult.

The reimbursements are the outcome of a controversial move during Gov. Jennifer Granholm’s administration to withhold additional money from employees’ paychecks to pay for retiree health care benefits.

The Michigan Supreme Court upheld a ruling by the state Court of Appeals that the withdrawals were unconstitutional. As a result, the state is giving back $550 million to school employees with interest. The amount employees get depends on what they were paid at the time, either 1.5 or 3 percent of their salary.

While every district in the state is charged with handling the refunds, the Detroit district has a larger burden, tasked with processing 13,416 refunds totaling $28.9 million.

Some of the employees no longer work for the district and do not have an updated address on file, the district said, so employees have been asked to update their information by Feb. 28.

Another challenge: The district is trying to fill five positions in the financial department, the area charged with issuing the checks.

Jeremy Vidito, the district’s chief financial officer, said the state did not allocate extra dollars for additional support staff to help with the task, so the department is working overtime to process the checks.

“It’s prioritizing,” he said. “So there are items that we are going to push back to make sure this happens. It’s also … asking people to do more with less.”

Despite the challenges, the district said it plans to begin mailing checks starting the third week of March.


Cap and gown

Graduation rates in Michigan – and Detroit’s main district — are up, but are most students ready for college?

The state superintendent had some good news to share Wednesday about last year’s four-year graduation rates: They are at their highest level in years.

What’s not clear is whether new graduates are being adequately prepared for college.

Slightly more than 80 percent of the state’s high school students graduated last year, an increase of about half a percentage point from the previous year. It was news state education leaders cheered.

“An 80 percent statewide graduation rate is a new watermark for our schools. They’ve worked hard to steadily improve,” state Superintendent Brian Whiston said in a statement.

“This is another important step in helping Michigan become a Top 10 education state in 10 years. We aren’t there yet, so we need to keep working and moving forward,” he said.

But statewide, the number of students ready for college based on their scores on the Scholastic Aptitude Test was about 35 percent, underscoring the fact that graduation rate is not necessarily a great measure of school success. Schools looking to raise graduation rates can find ways to make it easier for students to earn credits toward graduation and, unlike some states, Michigan does not require students to pass graduation exams.

The result is that more students are graduating from high school — but might not be ready to do college work.

In Detroit, graduation rates in the city’s main district remained largely steady, with a little more than three-quarters of its students graduating after four years. But the number of students who were ready for college dropped almost a point to 12.3 percent last year. While most students take the SAT in 11th grade as part of the state’s school testing program, that’s an indication students graduating from high school may not have been adequately prepared for college.

The state dropout rate remained largely unchanged at almost nine percent.

Detroit’s main district had the highest four-year graduation rates compared to other large districts, but more district students dropped out of school than in the previous year. More than 10 percent of Detroit students dropped out of high school in the 2016-17 school year, a slight increase from last year, according to state data.

Nikolai Vitti, Detroit’s school chief, said the report should motivate the district to ensure students are graduating at higher numbers, and are college ready when they leave high school.

“We are focused on creating a college going culture in our high schools by expanding accelerating programs, such as IB, dual enrollment, AP, and Early College,” he said. “We have already expanded SAT preparation during the school day and intend to offer classes within the schedule for this focus with 10th graders next year.”

Focusing on strengthening basic skills among elementary and middle school students also will better prepare them for college after graduation, Vitti said.

“Most importantly, if we teach the Common Core standards with fidelity and a stronger aligned curriculum, which we will next year at the K-8 level for reading and math, our students will be exposed to college ready skills and knowledge,” he added. “We look forward to demonstrating the true and untapped talent of our students in the years to come.”

But in spite of steady dropout rates and relatively low college readiness numbers, state officials were upbeat about the graduation results.

“This is the first time the statewide four-year graduation rate has surpassed 80 percent since we started calculating rates by cohorts eleven years ago,” said Tom Howell, director of the Michigan Center for Educational Performance and Information, which tracks school data. “This increase is in line with how the statewide graduation rate has been trending gradually upward.”

Search below to see the four-year graduation rates and college readiness rates for all Michigan high schools.