Weekend Reads

Weekend Reading: 25 Wall Street investors make more money than all of America's kindergarten teachers

PHOTO: Alan Petersime
Kindergarteners use computers at IPS School 90.
  • Just 25 top hedge fund managers make more salary than all kindergarten teachers combined. (Washington Post)
  • A student-led project at Queens’ August Martin High School brought more than 100 graffiti artists into the school to decorate the school’s hallways. (Animal New York)
  • State enrollment in preschool inches up but disparities remain. (AP)
  • Peter Gray: Starting academic instruction too early can cause harm. (Psychology Today)
  • Should schools teach kids to meditate? (The Atlantic)
  • A California 11th-grader describes many logistical and conceptual challenges to the state’s new computer-based tests. (Slate)
  • A University of Tennessee literacy professor argues that strategies to improve low-income students’ access to books during the summer is key to ending achievement gaps in reading. (Booksource Banter)
  • A new report by an advocacy group backed by former U.S. Secretary of State Colin Powell argues that the record numbers of students graduating from high school can be attributed to education reform efforts like closing low-performing schools, rather than the improved economy. (The Atlantic)
  • But although nationally graduation rates are at record highs, a few states like Arizona, Illinois and New York are seeing their graduation rates drop and income-based gaps increase. (The Atlantic)
  • An overlooked takeaway from last week’s large study on social mobility is that in places that see good outcomes for poor children, rich children not only don’t fare worse, but in fact do better. (Wonkblog)
  • The question of whether Chicago Public Schools ever had a “golden era” is complicated to answer, but one education reporter suggests that it might be right now. (WBEZ)
  • L.A. Unified School District is building an affordable housing complex for teachers who want to live near work but who can’t pay L.A. rents on their salaries. (Curbed)
  • The term “education reform” is often criticized as a misnomer for a movement that has increasingly become the status quo, but Alexander Russo argues that reformers still haven’t reshaped the fundamental structures of the American education system. (The Grade)

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Weekend Reads: ‘Love and love hard,’ a KIPP Tulsa teacher tells us all

PHOTO: Caroline Bauman
  • New Haven’s schools chief has fallen out of favor after seven years there, and now he’s looking to leave. (N.H. Independent)
  • The KIPP charter network urged its schools to act after Terence Crutcher, a KIPP dad, was killed by police in Tulsa. (Chalkbeat)
  • What that action looked like at KIPP Tulsa College Prep, where at least 10 students are related to Crutcher. (Tulsa World)
  • A teacher at the school went viral after sharing her experiences talking to students — and her advice to “love and love hard.” (Facebook)
  • Great teachers are experts at having hard conversations. Here’s their advice to America. (Chalkbeat)
  • One of Nevada’s wealthiest women is also the state’s glamorous board of education president. (Pacific Standard)
  • Two seasoned education policy wonks are leading Donald Trump’s education transition planning. (Politics K-12)
  • Why is Tennessee’s first single-sex charter school thriving? Not for the reason you might think. (The Atlantic)
  • Efforts are underway to improve black students’ experience at a diverse school where they still come out behind. (Bloomberg)

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Weekend Reads: Why Texas stopped students with disabilities from getting the help they need

PHOTO: Alan Petersime
  • A story about school choice in Philadelphia didn’t mention race drew criticism from Nikole Hannah-Jones (and others). (Billy Penn)
  • What KIPP did after it realized how many graduates were dropping out of college has changed the conversation about success. (Chalkbeat)
  • Texas has systematically prevented children with disabilities from getting the help they’re legally entitled to, according to a new investigation. (Houston Chronicle)
  • An exit interview with Kaya Henderson, the chief who took D.C. schools from “dead” to cracking down on families faking addresses to get in. (Scholastic)
  • Watch this video to get up speed on the Common Core standards and why they’re still under fire. (EdWeek)
  • A coach speaks directly, and encouragingly, to a student whose teacher sees him as a problem. (Education Post)
  • What Donald Trump is really saying when he says he’d create home-school vouchers for poor kids. (Slate)
  • A new study found that the greatest determinant of police surveillance in schools is the presence of students of color. (The Atlantic)
  • Catch up on the last year — and century — in Detroit schools, one of the few places where police seem to be visible in that city. (Harpers)
  • Among the details in a lawsuit challenging the quality of education in Detroit: condoms on the floor and teachers without training. (Chalkbeat)