The U.S. Department of Education is putting $2.2 million behind an Indianapolis initiative focused on engaging community groups to better serve students at Indianapolis Public Schools’ struggling George Washington High School and the elementary schools that feed into it.

Mary Rigg Neighborhood Center, one of George Washington High School’s nearly 70 partners across the city, was awarded a five-year grant to continue its current work with students through the community schools initiative, including tutoring, after-school programs, family assistance and college preparation.

“Mary Rigg Neighborhood Center will continue to work closely with our schools and community partners to help create the necessary conditions for learning for youth on the west side of Indianapolis,” said Clark Lienemann, executive director of the center. “Our community schools partnerships exemplify our best community efforts to support and empower students and their families every day.”

George Washington High School has earned a D grade from the state for the past two years for low student test scores. With a new principal at its helm, IPS is hoping for better results. But students and teachers there this year described a chaotic environment with nearly daily fights and racial tension. Chalkbeat found that about one in 5 Hispanic students appear to have fled in a single year.

The four feeder schools that will be supported through the grant are School 49, School 63, School 46 and School 67.