Weekend Reads

Weekend Reading: Turmoil in Chicago schools could spread as bribery probe extends to Detroit

  • Corruption in Chicago’s schools is the latest education-related headache for Mayor Rahm Emmauel. (The Economist)
  • Investigators are checking to see if disgraced former Chicago school chief Barbara Byrd-Bennett gave sweetheart deals to benefactors during her time in Detroit. (Chicago Tribune)
  • Ex-Detroit principal to plead guilty in corruption case. (Detroit Free-Press)
  • Ohio’s winning federal grant application appears to have stretched the truth pretty far. (Columbus Dispatch)
  • Once the scourge of education reform in Kentucky, Floyd County schools are now the star. (Lexington Herald-Leader)
  • A panel of judges in Texas dismissed a lawsuit brought by the family of black students who were harassed for being black, even as the opinion acknowledged that many severe incidents against the students occurred. (Slate)
  • Here is a cool collection of interviews with New York City teachers on everything from why they chose to teach to their feelings on standardized testing to their own experiences in school. (Gothamist)
  • The mother of one of the few white students in her neighborhood school questions why her white neighbors want to start a charter school that emphasized diversity rather than attend the neighborhood school where diversity already exists. (Huffington Post)
  • A critical look at the legacy of outgoing U.S. Education Secretary Arne Duncan points to persistent gaps between rich and poor school districts and the backlash against the Common Core. (The Nation)
  • The school board in Charlotte-Mecklenburg, N.C., moved one step closer to adopting an enrollment plan that emphasizes choice and school diversity, but didn’t discuss a proposal to use factors such as race and socioeconomic diversity as considerations when drawing school boundaries. (Charlotte Observer)
  • A group of national, state and local teachers unions is pressuring school districts to abandon the McDonald’s-branded school fundraiser known as McTeacher’s Night. (NPR)
  • Why did Intel end its relationship with the high school science competition the Science Talent Search? It may be because the company is now focusing more on the newer Maker Faire. (The Atlantic)
  • Eva Moskowitz, the head of the high profile Success Academy charter school network, defends her schools’ practice of suspending very young students. (NewsHour)
  • Jimmy Fallon paid homage to his upstate New York high school in a funny school announcements parody sketch with Gabrielle Union. (Daily Freeman)

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Weekend Reads: ‘Love and love hard,’ a KIPP Tulsa teacher tells us all

PHOTO: Caroline Bauman
  • New Haven’s schools chief has fallen out of favor after seven years there, and now he’s looking to leave. (N.H. Independent)
  • The KIPP charter network urged its schools to act after Terence Crutcher, a KIPP dad, was killed by police in Tulsa. (Chalkbeat)
  • What that action looked like at KIPP Tulsa College Prep, where at least 10 students are related to Crutcher. (Tulsa World)
  • A teacher at the school went viral after sharing her experiences talking to students — and her advice to “love and love hard.” (Facebook)
  • Great teachers are experts at having hard conversations. Here’s their advice to America. (Chalkbeat)
  • One of Nevada’s wealthiest women is also the state’s glamorous board of education president. (Pacific Standard)
  • Two seasoned education policy wonks are leading Donald Trump’s education transition planning. (Politics K-12)
  • Why is Tennessee’s first single-sex charter school thriving? Not for the reason you might think. (The Atlantic)
  • Efforts are underway to improve black students’ experience at a diverse school where they still come out behind. (Bloomberg)

reading list

Weekend Reads: Why Texas stopped students with disabilities from getting the help they need

PHOTO: Alan Petersime
  • A story about school choice in Philadelphia didn’t mention race drew criticism from Nikole Hannah-Jones (and others). (Billy Penn)
  • What KIPP did after it realized how many graduates were dropping out of college has changed the conversation about success. (Chalkbeat)
  • Texas has systematically prevented children with disabilities from getting the help they’re legally entitled to, according to a new investigation. (Houston Chronicle)
  • An exit interview with Kaya Henderson, the chief who took D.C. schools from “dead” to cracking down on families faking addresses to get in. (Scholastic)
  • Watch this video to get up speed on the Common Core standards and why they’re still under fire. (EdWeek)
  • A coach speaks directly, and encouragingly, to a student whose teacher sees him as a problem. (Education Post)
  • What Donald Trump is really saying when he says he’d create home-school vouchers for poor kids. (Slate)
  • A new study found that the greatest determinant of police surveillance in schools is the presence of students of color. (The Atlantic)
  • Catch up on the last year — and century — in Detroit schools, one of the few places where police seem to be visible in that city. (Harpers)
  • Among the details in a lawsuit challenging the quality of education in Detroit: condoms on the floor and teachers without training. (Chalkbeat)