Here, in a feature we call How I Teach, we ask educators who’ve been recognized for their work how they approach their jobs. You can see other pieces in the series here.

Even though Lacy Spears teaches at an online school, much of her work takes place off-line.

She keeps a meticulous planner to track not just online classes and meetings with students, but also in-person events and meetings, phone calls to families, and professional development opportunities.

“There are a lot of moving pieces in the daily life of an online educator,” she said.

Spears is a seventh- and eighth-grade reading interventionist at the Insight School of Indiana, a statewide virtual charter school that is part of the Hoosier Academies network.

Spears, who was recently named one of 68 finalists for 2019 Indiana Teacher of the Year, talked to Chalkbeat about how she works with her students, and how teaching at an online school has changed her perspective on school choice.

This interview has been condensed and lightly edited.

Was there a moment when you decided to become a teacher?

Like so many other educators, I fell in love with school and education thanks to a wonderful teacher I had when I was a student. My fifth-grade teacher, Mrs. Kim Ferguson, really treated me like an individual and helped me learn how to play to my strengths. She gave me more leadership roles in the classroom, encouraged my love of writing, and made a huge effort to connect with me. Mrs. Ferguson even let me stay with her after school every day to help organize her classroom. Her guidance and the relationship she cultivated with me really led me to the path of becoming a teacher.

How do you get to know your students?

It takes a lot of intentionality to get to know students, especially in an online school. With this in mind, I call each of my students and their families at the beginning of the year. I like to introduce myself, make sure they feel ready for the school year, and see how I can help them have a successful start, particularly if they’re new to online learning. Within the first few weeks, I ask students to create a vision board, and I work with them to craft a short-term and long-term goal list for the school year. I keep this dialogue up throughout the year and talk to all my families at least once per month. I also hold student-led conferences at least every quarter to take a closer look at student progress and talk about each student’s goals and how I can best support them.

Additionally, I ask my students to submit interest and reading surveys, which I use to select materials and activities for the class. For example, a lot of my students last year really liked music. So, to help them practice their reading skills I found articles about their favorite artists to help pique their interest. I also played music and used song lyrics to analyze literary elements such as themes and main ideas. Knowing what they’re interested in helps me keep them focused on learning.

Although my classes take place online, I try my best to see my students in person as much as possible. Insight School of Indiana hosts events across the state to help students connect with their peers in their communities. I love to attend these events and help lead several school activities. For example, I serve as the advisor for our school’s chapter of the National Junior Honor Society and manage our school-based food pantry. These are all wonderful opportunities to get to know my students and their families outside of the online classroom.

Lastly, I always try to devote some class time to helping students get to know each other. A few minutes before class begins, I like to invite them to share something about themselves via their webcams. I learn so much more about my students when I see them connect with and support each other in the safe learning environment of our online platform.

Tell us about a favorite lesson to teach. Where did the idea come from?

Lesson planning is one of my favorite parts of teaching. I love the creativity that it allows. I also welcome the opportunity to design lessons that support me in providing a personalized education for each student. I especially love to help them design their own lesson plans, which allows them to take on the role of teacher. The objective is to design a lesson that explains a concept to their peers. Doing this activity helps students master content, keeps them motivated, and helps them retain more information.

To guide them through the process, I first encourage students to use four steps: topic selection, brainstorming lesson elements, designing assessment criteria, and planning and delivery. Students use class time to design their lessons and collaborate with one of their peers to receive feedback. Afterward, they teach their lesson to the class.

The first time I did this activity, I had never seen my students so engaged! Providing opportunities for peer feedback enhances their understanding, and students benefit from the advice and observations of their peers prior to presenting their final projects. Students also become experts on their researched concepts and are proud to teach other students about the new information they learn. They take ownership over their education, reflect on the learning process, collaborate to improve, and practice public speaking skills.

What’s something happening in the community that affects what goes on inside your class?

More and more, I think we are seeing kids coming to school with worries and troubles from their home lives. So many students are struggling to have their basic needs met. They don’t have enough food, clean clothes, reliable transportation, or a steady roof over their heads. It is challenging to focus on school when you have an empty stomach and haven’t slept. Our school has tried to meet some of those needs through a variety of support programs, including the school’s food pantry in Indianapolis. We work with our families to provide access to clothing, toiletries, and other necessities throughout the year.

Tell us about a memorable time — good or bad — when contact with a student’s family changed your perspective or approach.

When I first started teaching, I assumed that when parents didn’t answer the phone when I called home, or didn’t sign their children’s permission slips, or didn’t seem very present, that they must not value education. As I got to know my families, though, I realized that wasn’t the case.

One of my first students sticks out in my mind. His mother had passed away, his dad worked multiple jobs to keep food on their table, and my student was home alone most of the time after school. Feeling frustrated one day with this student’s lack of progress, I asked him what I might do to help him stay motivated and to get him back on track. He mentioned that since his dad was usually working, his grandma was often the only adult he had in his home life. He gave me her phone number, and we called her together. I realized through this conversation, and subsequent calls, that this family absolutely valued education. They just needed food on their table more immediately than they needed to get back to me.

Since then, I am very careful never to judge a family or make assumptions before getting to know them. Sometimes the perspective and the circumstance of a family is just different from your own, or from the majority of your students. Everyone has other things going on in their lives, but it doesn’t mean that they don’t care or that they aren’t doing everything they can for their children.

What part of your job is most difficult?

I think the most difficult part of my job is striking a balance between positive academic outcomes and taking the time to connect with my students on a personal level. It can be easy to get so focused on testing and data that you leave out time to know your students — to listen to them and help them not only master skills and content, but also learn how to build positive relationships, solve problems, and communicate. Teachers aren’t just responsible for academic success. We play an integral role in helping students become well-rounded adults. It can be a challenge to make sure each student has what they need outside of school to succeed in class, but I’m proud to be a part of a learning community at Insight School of Indiana that provides a host of support resources to our students and their families, including our food pantry, college and career planning support, remediation programs, and help with accessing social services.

What was your biggest misconception that you initially brought to teaching?

The biggest misconception that I had is that the best school for a student is the school they are assigned by their district. I bought into a lot of the criticisms of school choice when I first became a teacher. I’ll admit that most of the uncertainty I held came more from misinformation than actual experience or facts. Since becoming a teacher at an online charter school, I’ve really seen the benefits that school choice can have for children and families. We have so many students at Insight School of Indiana who are much more successful and feel more secure than they did in their locally-assigned program.

Learning is a personal journey, and while many students thrive in a traditional setting, that’s not the case for everyone. So many students benefit from school choice, and students enroll in online school for a variety of reasons. Whether they are advanced learners or need additional support, are looking for a safe and bullying-free environment, or need to balance academic goals with extracurricular pursuits or medical needs, Insight School of Indiana offers an education they wouldn’t otherwise have access to. The online platform gives our students a public education option that meets their unique needs, and it allows them to set and work towards their goals regardless of their circumstances or previous experiences. Our personalized learning approach definitely helps put students on a path to success.

What are you reading for enjoyment?

As a reading teacher, I gravitate towards things I can talk about with my students. Right now, I’m re-reading The Dark Artifices series by Cassandra Clare. The final book in the series is supposed to come out later this year, and I can’t wait!

What’s the best advice you’ve received about teaching?

Never hold grudges. Students must come to school each day with a clean slate from the day before. They need to be free to make mistakes, to learn from them, and to still feel loved and valued along the way.