comings and goings

Head of student enrollment retires from the office she built

The head of student enrollment is retiring from the office she created after overseeing massive changes in how students apply and are accepted to city high schools.

In an email, Chancellor Joel Klein said that Elizabeth Sciabarra, who founded the Office of Student Enrollment in 2003, will retire at the end of this month. Sciabarra, who has worked in schools and for the Department of Education for 37 years, has been the architect overseeing how the chancellor’s policy of high school choice has been enacted.

Her retirement may not come at a great time for families — students’ high school applications are due to the city on December 3 — and Sciabarra is known for her willingness to personally respond to parents’ cries of confusion.

“I would say she’s done an amazing job in transforming the admissions system,” said InsideSchools’ editor Pam Wheaton. “That’s not to say there still aren’t glitches, but when InsideSchools began in 2002, it was a really flawed system.”

In the last eight years, the city has opened more than 200 new high schools, adding pages to the tome that is the high school directory, and necessitating more communication with parents about what their options are. To do this, Sciabarra created the High School Admissions Ambassadors Program, which taught a handful of parents the intricacies of the admissions process and brought them to events where they could help other parents.

At the end of this month, Chief Operating Officer of the Portfolio Planning office Rob Sanft will temporarily replace Sciabarra, who is staying on as a part-time consultant.

Klein’s full email follows:

Dear Colleagues,

I am writing to let you know that after 37 years of service to New York City public schools, Elizabeth Sciabarra will retire later this month. Liz currently serves as CEO of the Office of Student Enrollment, which she founded in 2003. Rob Sanft, who served as Liz’s Chief Operating Officer from 2004-2010 and is currently COO for the Division of Portfolio Planning (DPP), will lead the Office of Student Enrollment on an interim basis. We are undertaking a search for a new leader. Liz will advise DPP as a part-time consultant to assist in the transition to new leadership.

Liz began her career at Brooklyn Technical High School, where she served as an English teacher, then as Coordinator of Student Affairs, and then as Assistant Principal of Pupil Personnel Services. Liz later served as principal of New Dorp High School on Staten Island for almost ten years before becoming Deputy Superintendent of Brooklyn and Staten Island High Schools, Deputy Superintendent of High Schools, and finally Superintendent of Selective Schools.

Since founding the Office of Student Enrollment in 2003, Liz has overseen enrollment services for students in pre-kindergarten through high school, including pre-kindergarten admissions, kindergarten enrollment, elementary school gifted and talented placement, middle school choice, high school admissions, placement and transfers, and NCLB Public School Choice. Under Liz’s leadership, the Office of Student Enrollment developed the nation’s premier high school choice system. Most recently, Liz launched the High School Admissions Ambassadors Program, designed to teach interested parents and stakeholders about the high school admissions process and to engage them in high school admissions events across the city.

Beginning November 22, Rob will serve as Interim Acting CEO for Enrollment. Susan Cofield, Executive Director of Manhattan Enrollment, will take on additional responsibilities to oversee pre-k through 5th grade enrollment and gifted and talented enrollment. Sandy Ferguson, who currently leads our middle school enrollment, will now oversee 6th through 12th grade enrollment. Together, these three leaders bring more than 58 years of experience working with New York City public schools. I am confident they will successfully lead this year’s admissions and choice processes.

We are grateful that Liz will continue to support this enrollment cycle and remain connected to our work. Liz has shown an unrelenting drive to put children first, and has been an inspiration and a model for all of our staff. She has served as an ambassador for reform and a dedicated advocate for students. Please join me in thanking Liz for her years of service and immeasurable contribution to the children of New York City.

Sincerely,

Joel Klein

weekend update

How the education world is reacting to racist violence in Charlottesville — and to Trump’s muted response

PHOTO: Andrew Dallos/Flickr
A rally against hate in Tarrytown, New York, responds to the violence in Charlottesville.

For educators across the country, this weekend’s eruption of racism and violence in Charlottesville, Virginia, offered yet another painful opportunity to communicate their values to families, colleagues, and community members.

Many decried the white supremacists who convened in the college town and clashed with protesters who had come to oppose their message. Some used social media to outline ideas about how to turn the distressing news into a teaching moment.

And others took issue with President Donald Trump’s statement criticizing violence “on many sides,” largely interpreted as an unwillingness to condemn white supremacists.

One leading education official, U.S. Education Secretary Betsy DeVos, followed Trump’s approach, criticizing what happened but not placing blame on anyone in particular:

DeVos’s two most recent predecessors were unequivocal, both about what unfolded in Charlottesville and whom to blame:

Leaders of the nation’s two largest teachers unions responded directly to Trump:

The American Federation of Teachers, Weingarten’s union, is supporting vigils across the country Sunday night organized by chapters of Indivisible, a coalition that emerged to resist the Trump administration. The union also promoted resources from Share My Lesson, its lesson-plan site, that deal with civil rights and related issues.

“As educators, we will continue to fulfill our responsibility to make sure our students feel safe and protected and valued for who they are,” Weingarten said in a statement with other AFT officials.

Local education officials took stands as well, often emotionally. Here’s what the superintendent in Memphis, which is engaged in the same debate about whether Confederate memorials should continue to stand that drew white supremacists to Charlottesville, said on Twitter:

Teachers in Hopson’s district return for the second week of classes on Monday. They’ve helped students process difficult moments before, such as a spate of police killings of black men in 2016; here’s advice they shared then and advice that teachers across the country offered up.

We want to hear from educators who are tackling this tough moment in their classrooms. Share your experiences and ideas here or in the form below. 

Betsy DeVos

‘Underperformer,’ ‘bully,’ and a ‘mermaid with legs’: NYMag story slams Betsy DeVos

PHOTO: New York Magazine
A drawing of DeVos commissioned by an 8-year-old starts the New York Magazine article.

A new article detailing Betsy DeVos’s first six months as U.S. education secretary concludes that she’s “a mermaid with legs: clumsy, conspicuous, and unable to move forward.”

That’s just one of several brutal critiques of DeVos’s leadership and effectiveness in the New York Magazine story, by Lisa Miller, who has previously covered efforts to overhaul high schools, New York City’s pre-kindergarten push, and the apocalypse. Here are some highlights:

  • Bipartisan befuddlement: The story summarizes the left’s well known opposition to DeVos’s school choice agenda. But her political allies also say she’s making unnecessary mistakes: “Most mystifying to those invested in her success is why DeVos hasn’t found herself some better help.”
  • A friend’s defense: DeVos is “muzzled” by the Trump administration, said her friend and frequent defender Kevin Chavous, a school choice activist.
  • The department reacts: “More often than not press statements are being written by career staff,” a spokesperson told Miller, rejecting claims that politics are trumping policy concerns.
  • D.C. colleagues speak: “When you talk to her, it’s a blank stare,” said Charles Doolittle, who quit the Department of Education in June. A current education department employee says: “It’s not clear that the secretary is making decisions or really capable of understanding the elements of a good decision.”
  • Kids critique: The magazine commissioned six portraits of DeVos drawn by grade-schoolers.
  • Special Olympics flip-flop: DeVos started out saying she was proud to partner with the athletics competition for people with disabilities — and quickly turned to defending a budget that cuts the program’s funding.
  • In conclusion: DeVos is an underperformer,” a “bully” and “ineffective,” Miller found based on her reporting.

Updated (July 31, 2017): A U.S. Education Department spokesperson responded to our request for comment, calling the New York Magazine story “nothing more than a hit piece.” Said Liz Hill: “The magazine clearly displayed its agenda by writing a story based on largely disputed claims and then leaving out of the article the many voices of those who are excited by the Secretary’s leadership and determination to improve education in America.”