look on the bright side

City, union stress "optimism" over future of teacher evaluations

Deputy Chancellor David Weiner talks to two first grade students at Young Scholars Academy in Brooklyn.

With another school year underway without a deal on new teacher evaluations, officials in charge of hammering out the evaluation system seemed only to agree on one thing: be optimistic.

That was the mantra for Chancellor Dennis Walcott and Mayor Michael Bloomberg as they toured the halls of the New Settlement Campus in the South Bronx this morning.

“I’m always optimistic,” Bloomberg told reporters in the spotless new library. “If we don’t get a deal by January we will forfeit a lot of state funds.”

Teachers Union President Michael Mulgrew told a similar story when he spoke this morning in Brooklyn.

“We are definitely having conversations, pretty good conversations,” he said, “and we’re hoping to get it done.”

The city and union have been negotiating over evaluations for more than a year with the as-yet-unfulfilled hope of securing federal funds that are not available to districts without evaluations. Now they are under the gun from the state, too. Gov. Andrew Cuomo has said he will withhold state aid increases from districts that do not adopt new evaluations by January 2013.

Officials have volunteered no updates on the negotiations. But at the chancellor’s next stop, Deputy Chancellor David Weiner took a break from shaking hands with teachers at Bedford-Stuyvesant’s Young Scholars Academy for Discovery and Exploration and kneeling beside first graders honing their self-portraiture skills to say that his outlook was positive as well.

Weiner, the Department of Education officials overseeing negotiations, has been meeting regularly with union officials for months, he said, and thinks they are “continuing to move forward.” He said the January deadline set by the state might provide the ticking clock necessary to finish the deal.

“Both we and the unions are very aware of the importance of actually making sure we get the evaluations done by the date the governor has set,” he said.

The teachers union has long faced heat from the press and the mayor’s office over its staunch refusal to accept a system that some worry will allow the department to erode teachers’ job security. The union has offered some concessions, such as a partial agreement for struggling schools eligible to receive federal funding, but city officials rejected that plan last month, reasoning that there is little value to finalizing a partial deal when a full one is needed.

Mulgrew did not join Bloomberg or Walcott on their school visits, but Bloomberg assured reporters that theirs was a problem of diverging schedules, and not evidence of any animosity over the negotiations. In the past, the union head and chancellor used to make a joint appearance on the first day of school, but that tradition ended in 2010.

After paying a visit to Sunset Park High School in Brooklyn, Mulgrew told GothamSchools he would make the negotiations his top priority this fall. That’s what he said last fall, but since then the city and the union have clashed repeatedly over the specifics of the system, which must adhere to state guidelines. They even abruptly halted negotiations at one point in a high-profile stalemate that ultimately lost the city $30 million in federal School Improvement Grants.

Despite his optimism, Mulgrew signaled that the ideological chasm between the UFT and the city remains large.

“They think teacher evaluations should be about getting teachers,” Mulgrew said, delving into one of the main concerns at play. “We think teacher evaluations should be about helping and supporting teachers because then they do their jobs better and kids win. That’s the big difference.”

Danika Lacroix, the principal of Young Scholar’s Academy, raised similar concerns with the evaluations this morning. Hers is one of 250 schools practicing the new teacher evaluation system, which is already being rolled out slowly at some schools over the past three years.

“We’ve messaged it here as a professional development tool, and messaging it that way has eased a lot of tension” she said. “Our teachers are really hungry, they all want to be highly effective teachers, so they seek feedback. They want us to come into the classrooms.”

Lacroix said she wants her staff to think about the evaluation system as an opportunity for collaboration, not competition. To that end, she often invites teachers to sit in on classrooms observations alongside her, she said, and at the end of the 2011-2012 school year she shared individual evaluation results with the entire staff.

Weiner said the pilot program is preparing the city to charge ahead with an evaluation system once a deal is made.

Department officials have been collecting and reviewing data from the pilot schools, he said, and would use that information to inform a citywide rollout.

“We need to figure out what are the best models that exist in schools,” he said. “With 1700 schools, it’s obviously difficult to implement something without preparing first, and that’s what we’ve been doing over the past three years.”

teacher prep

Tennessee’s mediocre teacher training programs prompt ‘interventions’ with university presidents

PHOTO: Austin Peay
Austin Peay State University in Clarksville is among four Tennessee schools that have undergone "interventions" with state officials over the quality of their teacher training programs.

Armed with sobering data about the performance of teacher training programs in Tennessee, state officials are holding meetings with top brass at universities where they say programs have grown out of touch with the needs of K-12 classrooms.

About 40 programs in Tennessee feed the state’s teacher pipeline with about 4,000 new teachers annually. The largest are based at colleges and universities.

But those same traditional programs generally aren’t attracting enough high-quality candidates or producing enough effective or diverse teachers. Not a single public university in Tennessee scored in the top fifth of teacher training programs under a state report card issued in 2016. And the outlook isn’t expected to improve much under the 2017 report card being released early next month, officials say.

“This data is sobering. It tells us that higher education must do better,” said Mike Krause, executive director of the Tennessee Higher Education Commission. “I worry our higher education faculty in colleges of education get disconnected from what a K-12 classroom looks like.”

Krause outlined the challenges to state lawmakers during a presentation on Tuesday with Sara Heyburn Morrison, executive director of the Tennessee State Board of Education.

Their first “intervention meetings” were with the presidents and education deans at four universities: Austin Peay, Tennessee-Chattanooga, Tennessee-Martin, and Tennessee Tech. Similar meetings are scheduled this spring with leadership of private colleges and universities across the state.

Krause described the first meetings as “very productive” — and illuminating. “In many cases, the presidents just didn’t know” about their programs’ shortcomings, he said.

Teacher quality is considered a driving factor in students’ success, making the quality of teacher preparation programs a front-burner issue in Tennessee.  A 2016 report said only a handful of the state’s programs are consistently preparing teachers to improve student achievement based on Tennessee’s TVAAS measure. The State Board’s new grading system also highlighted weaknesses based on racial diversity, candidates’ ACT scores, and whether they are producing teachers for high-need areas such as special education.

Reading instruction is another big challenge. In a state where only a third of students are considered proficient in reading, new teachers are arriving in classrooms ill-prepared to instruct students on Tennessee’s new reading standards. The state is working with higher education institutions so their faculty can take the same professional development on literacy that working teachers are taking.

But for the most part, the State Board has limited levers for improving the quality of teacher prep. The biggest hammer comes every seven years when each program undergoes a comprehensive review for licensure. (In 2014, the state raised its standards and revised its measures for effectiveness to include data such as placement, retention and employer satisfaction.)

Chancellor Keith Carver

Tennessee-Martin Chancellor Keith Carver said his school took its last state report card to heart. As a result of its overall score of 2 out of a possible 4, the university hired an assessment coordinator to help guide decisions based on data. “It’s a really good baseline for improving,” he said of the report card. “We’ve got some work to do in our diversity profile.”

Tennessee’s teacher candidates are overwhelmingly white and female. Of those who completed Tennessee’s programs in 2016, only 14 percent identified themselves as non-white, compared with 36 percent of the state’s student population.

“Colleges of education will not stumble into diversity. There has to be a very intentional effort,” Krause said.

View the full presentation from Tuesday’s legislative hearing below.

Gold standard teachers

Tennessee adds nationally certified teachers but continues to trail in the South

PHOTO: Ruma Kumar/Chalkbeat

Twenty Tennessee educators have earned a national certification that’s considered the profession’s highest mark of achievement, although the state continues to lag in the South in growing that community.

The state Department of Education on Tuesday released the list of new educators designated as National Board Certified Teachers.

Their addition brings Tennessee’s number of NBCT educators to more than 700, with another 63 pursuing certification. By comparison, Kentucky has 3,600, Virginia 3,400, and Georgia 2,600.

“We know that teachers are the biggest factor in the success of our students, and it is an honor to celebrate educators who are helping their students grow, while serving as an example of what it means to be a lifelong learner,” Commissioner Candice McQueen said in a statement.

Nationally, 5,470 teachers earned the designation in 2016-17, raising the total to more than 118,000 through the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards. The certification takes from one to three years to complete and includes a performance-based peer-review process. Successful candidates must demonstrate a proven impact on student learning and achievement.

In Tennessee, at least 36 school districts offer at least one type of incentive for achieving the certification. The most common is a salary bonus.

North Carolina continues to lead the nation in certification, with 616 more teachers gaining the endorsement last month from the Arlington, Va.-based organization.

Earning their certification in Tennessee were:

  • John Bourn, Franklin Special School District
  • Christy Brawner, Shelby County Schools
  • James Campbell, Metro Nashville Public Schools
  • Kimberly Coyle, Sumner County Schools
  • Suzanne Edwards, Williamson County Schools
  • Anastasia Fredericksen, Metro Nashville Public Schools
  • Theresa Fuller, Kingsport City Schools
  • Amber Hartzler, Clarksville-Montgomery County School System
  • Jennifer Helm, Williamson County Schools
  • Deborah Higdon, Franklin Special School District
  • Karen Hummer, Franklin Special School District
  • Heather Meston, Metro Nashville Public Schools
  • Melissa Miller, Franklin Special School District
  • Kelsey Peace, Sumner County Schools
  • Lindsey Pellegrin, Franklin Special School District
  • Andrea Reeder, Williamson County Schools
  • Jordan Sims, Metro Nashville Public Schools
  • Susanna Singleton, Williamson County Schools
  • Melissa Stugart, Metro Nashville Public Schools
  • Drew Wilkerson, Franklin Special School District

To learn more, visit the website of the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards.