Transfer of power

In a shift, new rules make it easier for New York City students to switch schools

PHOTO: Sarah Darville
A high school fair at Brooklyn Technical HIgh School.

It’s just become easier for students to transfer between New York City schools — a big change for the labyrinthine school system, where it has been notoriously difficult to switch schools for more than a decade.

Thanks to a change in city regulations passed last week, parents can now request a new school for their child if he or she “is not progressing or achieving academically or socially.” Since 2003, transfers have been granted for a limited set of hardships, including serious safety concerns, medical issues, or extreme commutes.

Limiting transfers was meant to minimize disruption for schools and for students, officials have explained. “It wouldn’t be practical and it wouldn’t be beneficial for a student’s education to change schools every single year,” a Department of Education spokesman told Chalkbeat in 2009.

But that approach had downsides, especially at the high school level.

Some students got trapped in violent schools because transfers were available only to students who could show they had been victims of violence. Other students found themselves stuck in small schools with limited course offerings — a particular challenge for students whose interests and goals might have shifted since the high school application process in eighth grade.

A 2009 report by the New School’s Center for New York City Affairs included stories of students like one young mother who planned to drop out because she was unable to transfer to be closer to her baby’s child care. It recommended reintroducing the “guidance transfer,” or a way for a student to move from one school to another that might be a better fit.

That’s what happened last Wednesday, when the Panel for Educational Policy passed the new policy with little fanfare. Now, parents can request a guidance transfer, and the city’s central enrollment office will make a final decision.

“It’s about time,” said Clara Hemphill, the founding editor of Insideschools, the school-review website. “Because our schools are so highly specialized and stratified by academic ability, it’s particularly troublesome that a kid could be stuck.”

The new process will be personalized. Education department documents say that officials can request and review different evidence for each case, and the district superintendent must approve any transfer requested for academic reasons.

That flexibility reflects the de Blasio administration’s preference for individualized solutions to students’ and schools’ problems. (This approach has been on display in the past when Chancellor Carmen Fariña has advised concerned parents at public meetings to email her directly.)

In contrast, Joel Klein, the Bloomberg administration’s formative chancellor, argued even recently that systems can break down when exceptions are made. “You cannot have a choice system and then say to the kid, ‘You can transfer.’ It’s a choice system,” Klein told the Observer in 2014.

The new option raises questions about whether well-informed parents might try to use it to circumvent the usual school-choice process. It’s also unclear what level of academic or social trouble the department will see as meriting a transfer.

“The goal of implementing guidance transfers is to ensure we are doing as much as possible so students are in schools that meet their needs,” department spokesman Will Mantell said Monday. He said the city would be providing principals with additional guidance.

New layer

Tennessee cuts ribbon on its first charter school under State Board of Education

PHOTO: Helen Carefoot
Principal Jonas Cleaves cuts the ribbon at Bluff Hills High School's opening day ceremony. He is surrounded by students, faculty and leaders of Green Dot and the State Board of Education.

With the snip of a ribbon, Tennessee leaders helped to officially open a charter school on Tuesday in Memphis that marks a major shift in how the charter sector can grow in the state.

Bluff City High School, operated by Green Dot Public Schools in southeast Memphis, is the first charter school authorized by the State Board of Education.

The school opened last week at full capacity with 160 ninth-graders and a waiting list, despite uncertainty about its location as recently as four months ago. The plan is to grow the school to 600 students and four grades by 2020.

Bluff City’s opening adds a new layer of oversight to charter schools in Tennessee, where local school boards and the state-run Achievement School District already have that authority. Now the State Board does too under a 2014 state law that allows charter applicants to appeal to the State Board when local school boards deny their applications.

That’s what happened in Memphis last August when Shelby County Schools denied Green Dot’s application. The State Board later voted unanimously to overrule the local board.

“We felt like Green Dot really was prepared to serve this community well, and I think that’s already born out in the fact that it’s fully … enrolled even in its first year,” said Sara Heyburn Morrison, the board’s executive director.

PHOTO: Helen Carefoot
Math students are at work during the school’s second week.

Most students came from Wooddale and Kirby middle schools, both operated by Green Dot under the ASD. Green Dot used a lottery system to decide which of 270 applicants could attend. The operator already runs two other Memphis high schools, Fairley and Hillcrest, also under the ASD.

“Part of the reason we even applied for this school in the first place is — when the moratorium on growth for the Achievement School District happened — we were just starting our third year with Wooddale Middle and had bused 27 students across the city to Fairley. We still do that, but it’s hard for students,” said Megan Quaile, Green Dot’s executive director in Tennessee. “If they didn’t have a ride home, they didn’t get to participate in extracurriculars or sports the way you would if you were able to walk home from school.”

Quaile said her organization felt strongly about appealing the local school board’s decision. “We have been running schools since 2000, and we have a very strong high school model,” she said of the California-based operator.

Bluff City is starting with 10 classrooms and plans to build a gym this fall.

“Working with the State Board of Education has just been a very positive experience,” Quaile said. “They’re very thoughtful, they’re very responsible. We’ve worked really well with them to get everything started.”

Now the State Board will need to work with both Shelby County Schools and the ASD to align the city’s public schools and services to meet students’ needs in the Bluff City. That could be challenging given that the State Board stepped in to authorize the new Memphis school. 

“This is new territory for all of us in terms of the working relationship that we’ll need to continue to build out with Shelby County,” said Heyburn Morrison, whose team will also begin overseeing two Nashville charter schools in 2019.

PHOTO: Helen Carefoot
Darryl Buchanan and Adarrius Hicks are founding class members of Bluff City High School.

While the road to starting Bluff City High School was complicated, students who participated in Tuesday’s opening ceremony were mostly just interested in what lies ahead. They were excited to have a say in building the school’s culture by voting on a mascot (the wolves) and a school color (Carolina blue). Plans are also underway to establish clubs and a student government.

“I feel pressure, but this is going to make us into better leaders,” said Darryl Buchanan, 14, who wants his education to prepare him to be a politician someday. “Everyone here is going to be something and they want us to be successful. They want us to be a somebody.”

real estate

Two of three Memphis school buildings left empty by state-run charters will get new life, including Raleigh-Egypt

PHOTO: Laura Faith Kebede
The former Raleigh Egypt Middle School is back to housing middle schoolers under Shelby County Schools, not the state-run Achievement School District and its operator, Memphis Scholars.

Shelby County Schools has reclaimed a Memphis school building that formerly housed a state-run charter school that just moved across town.

This week, the former campus of Raleigh-Egypt Middle School began housing middle schoolers under the local district in Memphis.

District leaders posted a video Wednesday on Facebook showing students returning to the building that last year housed a charter school managed by Memphis Scholars.

“They did not stay in the building, so now Shelby County Schools has that building again, and middle schoolers have their own space,” said Shari Jones Meeks, principal of Raleigh-Egypt High School, which added middle school grades last year.

“We’ve been here every day this week trying to get our classrooms ready,” added Anna Godwin, a middle school science teacher. “It’s awesome, a lot of space. The kids are going to feel right at home.”

The change brings the school full circle after a year-long tug-of-war over students and facilities with the state-run Achievement School District, which took control of Raleigh-Egypt Middle last summer because of chronic low performance.

After the takeover, the local district expanded grades next door at Raleigh-Egypt High School in an effort to retain students. It worked. This spring, the charter organization got the state’s permission to move its under-enrolled school 16 miles away, where Memphis Scholars already operates an elementary school under Tennessee’s turnaround district.

Even though middle schoolers are returning to their old building, Raleigh-Egypt High School will remain one school with grades 6-12 and one administration, according to Michelle Stuart, facility planning manager for the district.

It’s one of three buildings left empty in recent months by the ASD and its charter operators — a first for the state-run district. All properties have returned to the control of Shelby County Schools, and only one stood empty as the new school year began.

Former school Current use Location
Memphis Scholars Raleigh Egypt Middle Likely will house Shelby County Schools middle schoolers Raleigh Egypt
Gestalt Community Schools Klondike Elementary Partly occupied by Perea Preschool North Memphis
KIPP Memphis Collegiate Schools University Middle Vacant and for sale Whitehaven

Klondike Elementary was closed by the ASD when its operator, Gestalt Community Schools, decided to exit its two North Memphis schools because of low enrollment. The ASD approved Frayser Community Schools to step in as the new operator at Humes Middle, but couldn’t secure one for Klondike.

While Shelby County Schools has no plan to resurrect Klondike at this time, it will continue to lease space to Perea Preschool, a private Christian school that will serve more than 160 children in a building designed for more than 600. Perea also has applied to open an elementary charter school at Klondike under Shelby County Schools, though that application was initially denied.

On the opposite side of Memphis, the building formerly occupied as a middle school by charter operator KIPP will be listed for sale, according to Stuart.

The former Memphis City school building was leased to KIPP beginning in 2014 by Shelby County Schools. Last December, KIPP leaders decided to close it too, citing low enrollment and the school’s remote location.