Early admissions

Applying to pre-K, kindergarten or gifted programs? Here’s where to learn more

PHOTO: Patrick Wall
Members of the city's pre-K outreach team encourage parents to enroll their four-year-olds during the last admissions cycle.

New York City families who are navigating the admissions process for pre-K, kindergarten, and gifted programs can, for the first time, attend information sessions in all 32 community school districts.

Sessions begin Nov. 1. City Department of Education staff will be on hand to help families find their zoned schools and non-zoned options, sign up students to test for gifted and talented programs, and answer questions about transportation, special education and programs for English learners.

To make the application process easier, this year marks the first time parents can learn about pre-K, kindergarten and gifted programs in a combined event.

“We’re committed to making it easier for families to find and enroll in the school that’s right for them,” Josh Wallack, a deputy chancellor for the DOE, said in a statement.

Here’s a list of information sessions by borough.

Manhattan:

Monday, November 7
6 p.m. – 8 p.m.
P.S. 92 Mary McLeod Bethune
222 W. 134th St.

Wednesday, November 9
6 p.m. – 8 p.m.
P.S./I.S. 210 Twenty-first Century Academy For Community Leadership
501-503 W. 152nd St.

Wednesday, November 9
6 p.m. – 8 p.m.
M.S. 260 Clinton School for Writers and Artists
10 East 15th St.

Thursday, November 10
6 p.m. – 8 p.m.
P.S. 333 Manhattan School for Children
154 W. 93rd St.

Thursday, November 17
4:30 p.m. -7:30 p.m.
The Tito Puente Complex
240 E. 109th St.

Thursday, Dec. 1
6 p.m. – 8 p.m.
P.S. 134 Henrietta Szold
293 E. Broadway

The Bronx

Monday, November 7
6 p.m. -8 p.m.
P.S. 119
1075 Pugsley Ave.

Wednesday, November 9
6 p.m. – 8 p.m.
P.S. 65 Mother Hale Academy
677 East 141st St.

Thursday, November 10
6 p.m. – 8 p.m.
P.S./I.S. 218 Rafael Hernandez Dual Language Magnet School
1220 Gerard Ave.

Monday, November 14
6 p.m. – 8 p.m.
P.S./M.S. 194
2365 Waterbury Ave.

Thursday, November 17
6 p.m. – 8 p.m.
P.S. 279 Captain Manuel Rivera, Jr.
2100 Walton Ave.

Thursday, November 17
6 p.m. – 8 p.m.
P.S. 214
1970 West Farms Road

Brooklyn

Tuesday, November 1
6 p.m. – 8 p.m.
P.S. 308 Clara Cardwell
616 Quincy St.

Tuesday, November 1
6 p.m. – 8 p.m.
P.S. 66
845 East 96 St.

Tuesday, November 1
6 p.m. – 8 p.m.
P.S. 156K Waverly School of the Arts
104 Sutter Ave.

Monday, November 7
6 p.m. – 8 p.m.
I.S. 96 Seth Low
99 Ave. P

Monday, November 7
6 p.m. – 8 p.m.
P.S. 376
194 Harman St.

Wednesday, November 9
6 p.m. – 8 p.m.
P.S. 770 The New American Academy
60 E. 94th St.

Thursday, November 10
6 p.m. – 8 p.m.
P.S. 13 Roberto Clemente
557 Pennsylvania Ave.

Monday, November 14
6 p.m. – 8 p.m.
P.S. 24
427 38th St.

Monday, November 14
6 p.m. – 8 p.m.
P.S. 222 Katherine R. Snyder
3301 Quentin Road

Tuesday, November 15
6:30 p.m. – 8:30 p.m.
P.S. 133 William A. Butler
610 Baltic St.

Tuesday, November 15
6 p.m. – 8 p.m.
Franklin D. Roosevelt High School
5800 20th Ave.

Thursday, November 17
6 p.m. – 8 p.m.
P.S. 110 The Monitor
124 Monitor St.

Queens

Tuesday, November 1
6 p.m. – 8 p.m.
P.S. 35 Nathaniel Woodhull
191-02 90th Ave.

Monday, November 7
6 p.m. – 8 p.m.
P.S. 182 Samantha Smith
153-27 88th Ave.

Monday, November 14
6 p.m. – 8 p.m.
I.S. 25 Adrien Block
34-65 192nd St.

Monday, November 14
6 p.m. – 8 p.m.
M.S. 137 America’s School Of Heroes
109-15 98th St.

Wednesday, November 16
6 p.m. – 8 p.m.
P.S./I.S. 266
74-10 Commonwealth Blvd.

Wednesday, November 16
6 p.m. – 8 p.m.
P.S. 110
43-18 97th Place

Thursday, November 17
6 p.m. – 8 p.m.
The Woodside Community School
39-07 57th St.

Staten Island

Thursday, November 10
6 p.m. – 8 p.m.
P.S. 58 Space Shuttle Columbia School
77 Marsh Ave.

Finding a home

Denver school board permanently co-locates charter elementary in middle school building

Students and staffers at Rocky Mountain Prep's first charter school in Denver cheer in 2012. (Photo by The Denver Post)

A Denver elementary charter school that was temporarily granted space in a shuttering district-run middle school building will now be housed there permanently.

The school board voted Thursday to permanently place Rocky Mountain Prep Southwest charter school in the Kepner Middle School building, where it is sharing space this year with three other school programs. Such co-locations can be controversial but have become more common in a district with skyrocketing real estate prices and ambitious school quality goals.

Rocky Mountain Prep Southwest is part of a homegrown charter network that has shown promising academic results. The network also has a school in Aurora and is expected to open a third Denver school next year in the northwest part of the city.

Rocky Mountain Prep Southwest was first placed at Kepner for the 2015-16 school year. The placement was supposed to be temporary. The district had decided the year before to phase out low-performing Kepner and replace it a new district-run middle school, Kepner Beacon, and a new charter middle school, STRIVE Prep Kepner, which is part of a larger network. The district also temporarily placed a third charter school there: Compass Academy.

Compass has since moved out of Kepner but the other four schools remain: Rocky Mountain Prep Southwest, Kepner Beacon, STRIVE Prep Kepner and the Kepner Legacy Middle School, which is on track to be completely phased out and closed by June 2019.

In a written recommendation to the school board, district officials acknowledged that permanently placing Rocky Mountain Prep Southwest at Kepner would create a space crunch.

The Kepner campus has the capacity to serve between 1,100 and 1,500 students, the recommendation says. Once all three schools reach full size, officials expect the schools will enroll a total of approximately 1,250 students. Rocky Mountain Prep Southwest currently serves students in preschool through third grade with a plan to add more grades.

“DPS facilities staff are currently working with all three schools to create a long‐term vision for the campus, including facility improvements that ensure all three schools have what they need to continue to excel,” says the recommendation from Chief Operating Officer David Suppes and Director of Operations and Support Services Liz Mendez.

District staff tried to find an alternate location for Rocky Mountain Prep Southwest but were unsuccessful, the recommendation says. The district does not have many available buildings, and competition for them among district-run and charter schools can be fierce. In northeast Denver, seven secondary schools are currently vying for the use of a shuttered elementary.

Future of Schools

Indianapolis needs tech workers. IPS hopes that George Washington will help fill that gap.

PHOTO: Dylan Peers McCoy

Indiana companies are looking for workers with computer expertise, and Indianapolis Public Schools leaders want their students to fill that gap.

Next year, George Washington High School will launch a specialized information technology academy designed to give students the skills to pursue careers in IT — and the exposure to know what jobs even exist.

“Half of what kids aspire to be is either someone they know does it or they’ve seen it on TV,” said Karen Jung, president of Nextech, a nonprofit that works to increase computer science preparation in K-12 schools. Nextech is partnering with IPS to develop the new IT program at George Washington.

For teens who don’t know anyone working in computer science, meeting role models is essential, Jung said. When teens see women of color or artists working in computer sciences, they realize there are opportunities for people like them.

“Once we put them in front of and inside of workplaces … it clicks,” Jung said. They believe “they would belong.”

The IT program is one of three academies that will open in George Washington next year as part of a broad plan to close nearly half of the district’s high schools and add specialized focus areas at the four remaining campuses. In addition to the IT academy, George Washington will have programs in: advanced manufacturing, engineering, and logistics; and business and finance.

The district is also moving to a model without neighborhood high schools. Students will be expected to choose high schools based on focus area rather than location. This year, many current high schoolers were required to reapply in an effort to make sure they enroll in academies that fit their interests.

The district will host a showcase of schools to help parents and students with their selections. The showcase runs from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday at the Indiana State Museum.

Stan Law, principal of Arlington High School now, will take over George Washington next year. (Arlington will close at the end of this year.) He said the new academies offer an opportunity for students to see what they need to master — from soft skills to knowledge — to get good jobs when they graduate.

“I want kids to really make the connection of the purpose of high school,” Law said. “It is that foundation for the rest of your life, in terms of the quality of life that you are going to live.”

PHOTO: Dylan Peers McCoy
Stan Law

When the IT academy launches next year, students who select the program will be able to spend about one to two classes per year focused on information technology, said Ben Carter, who runs career and technical education for IPS.

Carter hopes the academies will reshape George Washington and other IPS campuses by connecting potential careers with the work students do everyday at school. Students who share a focus area will be in a cohort, and they will share many of the same core classes such as English, math and history, said Carter. Teachers, in turn, will be able to relate what students are studying in their history class to projects they are working on in the IT program, for example.

To show students what a career in information technology might look like, students will have the chance to tour, connect with mentors and intern at local companies.

“If I’m in one of these career classes — I’m in software development, but then I get to go to Salesforce and walk through and see the environment, to me as a student, that’s inspiring,” said Carter. “It’s like, ‘oh, this is what I can have.’ ”

He added. “It increases engagement but also gives them a true sense of what the career is.”