no snow day

Nearly half of New York City students stayed home Friday following ‘bomb cyclone’ storm

PHOTO: Michael Appleton/Mayoral Photography Office.
The so-called "bomb cyclone" snow storm pummeled New York City on Thursday.

Just over half of New York City students made it to school Friday, when Mayor Bill de Blasio reopened schools following a so-called “bomb cyclone” winter storm that had blasted the city with snow and freezing winds the previous day.

After de Blasio declared a snow day Thursday, many New Yorkers called for another: A petition urging him to cancel school Friday garnered over 150,000 signatures.

Many educators predicted that large numbers of students would stay home if schools were reopened. On Friday, they were proved right: Attendance citywide was just over 53 percent, according to education department figures. (A department spokesperson pointed out that there have been five winter days with attendance between 45 and 70 percent since 2009.)

Some teachers took to social media on Friday to show off empty classrooms and auditoriums:

Despite the criticism from some corners, de Blasio is hardly stingy when it comes to closing school: The five snow days he’s declared in his four years as mayor is as many as his predecessor, Michael Bloomberg, called in 12 years.

Schools Chancellor Carmen Fariña (who has faced her share of snow day heat) has argued in the past that schools should stay open whenever possible because many working parents cannot quickly arrange childcare and some students might not otherwise receive a hot meal. In her view, families who cannot safely or easily get their children to school can simply declare a personal snow day.

“Parents can make a decision about whether to send their kid to school or not,” Fariña said in 2014.

Jessica Martell said about half of her fourth-grade class at Central Park East II in Manhattan was absent Friday, including at least one student who was stranded in the Dominican Republic because of cancelled flights. But she said she was happy to be back in school.

“There’s a lot to get done,” she said.

turnaround

Aurora recommends interventions in one elementary school, while another gets more time

Students during PE class at Lyn Knoll Elementary School in 2016 in Aurora, Colorado. (Photo by Helen H. Richardson/The Denver Post)

Aurora school district officials on Tuesday will recommend turning over management of some operations at one of their elementary schools to an outside management company.

The school, Lyn Knoll Elementary, is located in northwest Aurora near 2nd Avenue and Peoria Street and serves a high number of students from low-income families, with 4 percent of students identified as homeless. The school was one of three Aurora schools that earned the lowest rating from the state in 2017.

That rating automatically flags the school under a district process for school interventions. The process directs district officials to consider a number of possible improvement plans, including closure or turning the school over to a charter school.

Lyn Knoll has had good rankings in recent years before slipping dramatically in the past year, a change that put it on the turnaround list. The district did not recommend intervening at Paris Elementary, even though that school has been in priority improvement for years and will face state sanctions if it has one more year without improvement.

Annual ratings for Lyn Knoll Elementary

  • 2010: Improvement
  • 2011: Improvement
  • 2012: Performance
  • 2013: Improvement
  • 2014: Priority Improvement
  • 2016: Performance
  • 2017: Turnaround
Colorado Department of Education

The board will discuss the recommendation on Tuesday and vote on the school’s fate next month. In November, four union-backed board members who have been critical of charter schools won a majority role on the district’s school board. This will be their first major decision since taking a seat on the board.

In September, Superintendent Rico Munn had told the school board that among January’s school improvement recommendations, the one for Paris would be “the most high-profile.” A month later the district put out a request for information, seeking ideas to improve Aurora schools.

But in a board presentation released Friday, district officials didn’t give much attention to Paris. Instead, they will let Paris continue its rollout of an innovation plan approved two years ago. Officials have said they are hopeful the school will show improvements.

The recommendation for Lyn Knoll represents more drastic change, and it’s the only one that would require a board vote.

The district recommendation calls for replacing the current principal, drafting a contract for an outside company to help staff with training and instruction, and creating a plan to help recruit more students to the school.

Documents show district officials considered closing Lyn Knoll because it already has low and decreasing enrollment with just 238 current students. Those same documents note that while officials are concerned about the school’s trends, it has not had a long history of low ratings to warrant a closure.

In considering a charter school conversion, documents state that there is already a saturation of charter schools in that part of the city, and the community is interested in “the existence of a neighborhood school.” Two charter networks, however, did indicate interest in managing the school, the documents state.
The district recommendation would also include stripping the school’s current status as a pilot school.

Lyn Knoll and other schools labeled pilot schools in Aurora get some internal district autonomy under a program created more than 10 years ago by district and union officials.

Because Lyn Knoll is a pilot school, a committee that oversees that program also reviewed the school and made its own recommendation, which is different from the district’s.

In their report, committee members explained that while they gave the school low marks, they want the school to maintain pilot status for another year as long as it follows guidance on how to improve.

Among the observations in the committee’s report: The school doesn’t have an intervention program in place for students who need extra help in math, families are not engaged, and there has not been enough training for teachers on the new state standards.

The report also highlights the school’s daily physical education for students and noted that the school’s strength was in the school’s governance model that allowed teachers to feel involved in decision making.

Read the full committee report below.



Data dive

When Indiana kids leave a public school district, where do they go? New state data has the answer.

PHOTO: Alan Petersime

For the first time, Hoosier schools and community members have easier access to information showing where students go when they leave their public school district.

At a time when school choice has changed the political and education landscape in Indiana, knowing where and what kinds of schools students switch to  can be invaluable for educators looking to understand the competition they might face from charter schools, private schools, and even other district schools. Every single Indiana district’s enrollment is affected — either positively or negatively — by students leaving or coming into their boundaries.

Last week the Indiana Department of Education released a public school district transfer report for the first time. The report, which  includes information from this school year, is the latest data resource provided by the state to help school leaders navigate an ever more complex education landscape.

“Having a greater understanding of every aspect of our local districts will allow our educators to make important decisions and better plans,” said state Superintendent Jennifer McCormick.

The education department is set to release this data every spring and fall. It stems from a bill passed last year with strong bipartisan support that was offered after a lawmaker spoke with a local superintendent who wanted to learn more about why students were leaving her district.

Here are some highlights from the new data. The full document is available on the education department website here.

  1. 46,972 students live in Indianapolis Public School boundaries. 26,215 — about 55 percent — go to IPS, and 20,815 transfer to other districts, charter schools or private schools using a voucher. Of the students who transfer, 60 percent go to a charter school. That number includes 2,692 students who attend innovation schools.
  2. Indianapolis Public Schools also attracts 714 students from out of district. The largest number come from township districts. But there are also dozens of students from suburban districts such as Carmel, Brownsburg and Zionsville.
  3. In Marion County, Beech Grove Schools has gained the most students because of transfers, 823. It is also one of the districts most affected by transfers — 36 percent of Beech Grove students live outside the district. Beech Grove is the only Marion County district that had more students transferring in than out.
  4. Statewide, the small rural Union School Corporation (about an hour northeast of Indianapolis) stands out — more than 50 percent of the 367 students living in the district transferred to other schools outside the district. But the district also saw a huge influx of students — 631 — coming from other public districts.
  5. Nearly every district in the state — 284 out of 289 — has students who live in their boundaries attending online charter schools. (Read more about virtual schools here.)
  6. In Gary, a majority of students (61 percent) are not enrolled in their boundary district.
  7. Every district in the state loses at least some students to charter schools or other districts. But in 23 districts, not a single student receives vouchers to attend private school.