Headlines

Union, New York state officials gear up for a fight over teacher evaluations

Good morning!

The state education department could have new teacher evaluations in place by 2019, officials said Monday, but they likely won't get there without a fight. The union is gearing up for a push to return to local assessments.

Also, New York City teachers brought Black Lives Matter into their classrooms all last week, and the mayor is expected to announce an initiative to get high school students registered to vote.

Enjoy!

-- Christina

SED VS. NYSUT As the state prepares to overhaul how teachers are evaluated, it is also heading towards a clash with the union. Chalkbeat

BLM IN EDU New York City teachers brought Black Lives Matter into their classrooms with lessons on racial justice and a rally planned today at the education department’s headquarters. Chalkbeat

HELPING OUT Daisy Zheng tutors and mentors students with Breakthrough New York, an organization that once helped her make it to college when she was just a high school student herself. NY1

SPEAKING OUT Parents, activists and teachers protested at a Bronx school where the principal is accused of barring a teacher from giving a lesson on black history. New York Daily News

GET OUT THE VOTE At tonight’s State of the City address, Mayor Bill de Blasio is expected to announce an initiative that allows 17-year-olds to register to vote in school. New York Daily News

SURVEY SAYS The annual New York City school survey is out for parents, teachers and students. Staten Island Advance

NEW GRADS Students from the The Staten Island Young Adult Borough Center, which caters to students who have fallen behind in their studies, earned their high school diplomas last week. Staten Island Advance

MONEY MATTERS The city is expected to pay an extra $136 million in benefits to school bus drivers working for a single firm, a move that has been controversial with council members. New York Post

SICK IN SCHOOL Parents in Manhattan’s District 2 say middle school admissions policies that prioritize attendance mean that students go to school sick, even during an outbreak of the flu. New York Post

BUYING IN Opinion: Javeria Khan, managing director of schools at Success Academy, says parental investment in schools “must be earned.” The 74

ROLLBACK The U.S. Department of Education said it won’t take action on complaints from transgender students who are banned from using the restrooms that match their gender identity, though other types of complaints may be protected under federal law. NPR, BuzzFeed