• Half of Teach For America’s new recruits nationally are people of color. (Teacher Beat)
  • A Memphis teacher argues that educators in alternative schools shouldn’t be evaluated like everyone else. (Bluff City Ed)
  • Teachers in Los Angeles’s “teacher jails” say they are depressed and want to get back to work. (Al Jazeera America)
  • The biggest obstacle to lesson study, according to a former teacher, is educators’ lack of shared time. (The Atlantic)
  • Usually absent from criticism of the Common Core standards are ideas about what should replace them. (City & State)
  • Memphis and the South Bronx are the latest places to experiment in paying families for kids’ efforts in school. (Politico)
  • Urban Montessori schools are emerging as a response to “no excuses”-style education. (Next City)
  • Another unusual approach that continues to attract some adherents: unschooling. (Outside)
  • Here’s an argument for reading “Building a Better Teacher” in conjunction with books by actual teachers. (Hechinger)
  • Five thoughts about Michelle Rhee’s departure from StudentsFirst, from a fan who thinks she made errors. (Eduwonk)
  • Google has opened its free classroom organization software to all teachers. (TechCrunch)
  • A D.C. program is betting that struggling students can propel each other forward. (Greater Greater Ed)
  • Los Angeles is shifting to sending low-performing students to the next grade instead of holding them back. (Hechinger)
  • Three similar ways of describing students’ state test scores have very different meanings. (Shanker)
  • A city teacher got through a mental health crisis her first month in the classroom. (Critical Classrooms)
  • A city teacher says our big special education story should have paid more attention to District 75. (Ms Speducate)
  • Robin Williams, the actor who died this week, played a master teacher on multiple occasions. (NPRed) Here’s one: