Are Children Learning

Is Tennessee ready for TNReady? Five things to know about the state’s new standardized test

PHOTO: TN.gov
In less than ten months, Tennessee will debut a new standardized test to replace the TCAP.

This spring marks the last time Tennessee students will take the Tennesssee Comprehensive Assessment Program, fondly known as TCAP tests. Beginning next school year, the state’s standardized exam will be “TNReady,” a test being developed by North Carolina-based Measurement Inc.

Officials with the Tennessee Department of Education say the new assessment will be aligned with Tennessee classroom standards — whatever those end up being. But whether the Tennessee General Assembly decides to keep or replace the Common Core State Standards, the new test will roll out in only 10 months, when high school students on block schedules sit down for exams in November.

Here’s what we know so far about the new testing program:

1) It can be administered online or by paper. Guidelines are being drafted about which districts will use an online version of the test, and which will use paper and pencil, according to Emily Freitag, assistant commissioner of curriculum and instruction, who last week updated a joint meeting of the State Board of Education and Tennessee Higher Education Commission. Several states already have moved their testing online, and Tennessee was supposed to do the same this year by administering the PARCC test, an online Common Core-aligned test with open-ended questions. However, the legislature nixed the transition last spring in a pushback to Common Core, and instead mandated Tennessee students take the multiple-choice TCAP another year. Although districts have been preparing for an online test via PARCC, concerns remain that many districts, especially in rural areas, don’t have the technology to administer it.

2) It’s “adaptable” to new standards. A common complaint about TCAP has been that it doesn’t align with the state’s new standards, which were phased in from 2010 to 2014. A big selling point of the new test is that it finally can assess if students are meeting those standards.

However, whether those standards for math and English remain in place is still up for debate – literally. The Common Core State Standards are under review, and the legislature is considering a bill that would repeal them. If that happens, there won’t be much time for tentmakers to go back to the drawing board. Nakia Towns, assistant commissioner for data and research, assured last week’s joint session that the new test will adapt to whatever standards Tennessee ends up with. “We recognize that we are in a standards review process,” Towns said. “TNReady is going to give us the flexibility to align with standards, whatever those may be at the end of that process.”

3) The writing test will become part of the English/language arts test. This week, Tennessee students sat down for their TCAP writing tests for the last time — kind of. TNReady will have a separate written component, but the score will be part of students’ English/language arts score, not separate. The writing-intensive part of TNReady will be taken in February, as the writing test is currently done. The rest of the English assessment will be administered at the end of the year.

4) All sections of TNReady will involve writing. Gone are the days of all-multiple choice tests. Even the math TNReady will require students to explain some of their answers in writing. This could help students, since they now will be able to receive partial credit for showing their work in math. They also will have to rely less on calculators during the math assessment. The English exam will have several open-ended questions, in addition to the writing section.

5) There will be math assessments for both traditional high school math — Algebra I, Geometry and Algebra II — and integrated math. Last month, Metropolitan Nashville Public Schools announced that it will join four other Tennessee districts teaching integrated math, which teaches the same concepts as geometry and algebra, but integrates them across three years. A TCAP for integrated math doesn’t exist, and the move to have a statewide assessment for integrated math might encourage more districts to join in that course of study.

For more background on Measurement Inc., the company developing the test, read our past coverage.

Did we answer your questions about the state’s new testing tool? Are you ready for TNReady, or do you have reservations? Share your comments below.

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McQueen declares online practice test of TNReady a success

PHOTO: Manuel Breva Colmeiro/Getty Images

Tennessee’s computer testing platform held steady Tuesday as thousands of students logged on to test the test that lumbered through fits and starts last spring.

Hours after completing the 40-minute simulation with the help of more than a third of the state’s school districts, Education Commissioner Candice McQueen declared the practice run a success.

“We saw what we expected to see: a high volume of students are able to be on the testing platform simultaneously, and they are able to log on and submit practice tests in an overlapping way across Tennessee’s two time zones,” McQueen wrote district superintendents in a celebratory email.

McQueen ordered the “verification test” as a precaution to ensure that Questar, the state’s testing company, had fixed the bugs that contributed to widespread technical snafus and disruptions in April.

The spot check also allowed students to gain experience with the online platform and TNReady content.

“Within the next week, the districts that participated will receive a score report for all students that took a practice test to provide some information about students’ performance that can help inform their teachers’ instruction,” McQueen wrote.

The mock test simulated real testing conditions that schools will face this school year, with students on Eastern Time submitting their exams while students on Central Time were logging on.

In all, about 50,000 students across 51 districts participated, far more than the 30,000 high schoolers who will take their exams online after Thanksgiving in this school year’s first round of TNReady testing. Another simulation is planned before April when the vast majority of testing begins both online and with paper materials.

McQueen said her department will gather feedback this week from districts that participated in the simulation.

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Tennessee students to test the test under reworked computer platform

PHOTO: Getty Images

About 45,000 students in a third of Tennessee districts will log on Tuesday for a 40-minute simulation to make sure the state’s testing company has worked the bugs out of its online platform.

That platform, called Nextera, was rife with glitches last spring, disrupting days of testing and mostly disqualifying the results from the state’s accountability systems for students, teachers, and schools.

This week’s simulation is designed to make sure those technical problems don’t happen again under Questar, which in June will finish out its contract to administer the state’s TNReady assessment.

Tuesday’s trial run will begin at 8:30 a.m. Central Time and 9 a.m. Eastern Time in participating schools statewide to simulate testing scheduled for Nov. 26-Dec. 14, when some high school students will take their TNReady exams. Another simulation is planned before spring testing begins in April on a much larger scale.

The simulation is expected to involve far more than the 30,000 students who will test in real life after Thanksgiving. It also will take into account that Tennessee is split into two time zones.

“We’re looking at a true simulation,” said Education Commissioner Candice McQueen, noting that students on Eastern Time will be submitting their trial test forms while students on Central Time are logging on to their computers and tablets.

The goal is to verify that Questar, which has struggled to deliver a clean TNReady administration the last two years, has fixed the online problems that caused headaches for students who tried unsuccessfully to log on or submit their end-of-course tests.


Here’s a list of everything that went wrong with TNReady testing in 2018


The two primary culprits were functions that Questar added after a successful administration of TNReady last fall but before spring testing began in April: 1) a text-to-speech tool that enabled students with special needs to receive audible instructions; and 2) coupling the test’s login system with a new system for teachers to build practice tests.

Because Questar made the changes without conferring with the state, the company breached its contract and was docked $2.5 million out of its $30 million agreement.

“At the end of the day, this is about vendor execution,” McQueen told members of the State Board of Education last week. “We feel like there was a readiness on the part of the department and the districts … but our vendor execution was poor.”

PHOTO: TN.gov
Education Commissioner Candice McQueen

She added: “That’s why we’re taking extra precautions to verify in real time, before the testing window, that things have actually been accomplished.”

By the year’s end, Tennessee plans to request proposals from other companies to take over its testing program beginning in the fall of 2019, with a contract likely to be awarded in April.

The administration of outgoing Gov. Bill Haslam has kept both of Tennessee’s top gubernatorial candidates — Democrat Karl Dean and Republican Bill Lee — in the loop about the process. Officials say they want to avoid the pitfalls that happened as the state raced to find a new vendor in 2014 after the legislature pulled the plug on participating in a multi-state testing consortium known as PARCC.


Why state lawmakers share the blame, too, for TNReady testing headaches


“We feel like, during the first RFP process, there was lots of content expertise, meaning people who understood math and English language arts,” McQueen said. “But the need to have folks that understand assessment deeply as well as the technical side of assessment was potentially missing.”