reading list

Weekend Reads: Why affluent parents have outsized influence in diverse schools

PHOTO: Anika Anand
Children play in the gym of P.S. 133 in Park Slope in 2013. The school's admissions system, which sets aside some seats for low-income students and English learners, has served as a model for other schools hoping to maintain a diverse mix of students.
  • One takeaway from a recent study of school choice in Washington, D.C.: White parents will go long distances to make sure their kids go to majority-white schools. (Slate)
  • Selective admissions processes fuel segregation in Brooklyn’s middle schools. (Chalkbeat)
  • In rare schools that are racially and economically diverse, white and affluent parents often have outsized influence. (The Atlantic)
  • Read this if you want to get caught up on the last 50 years of policy, debate, and research related to the black-white achievement gap. (Chalkbeat)
  • San Francisco principals are defying their school board and hiring Teach For America teachers. (S.F. Chronicle)
  • A former Obama administration official and lifelong Democrat says the Democratic Party’s new education platform is a betrayal. (The 74 Million)
  • Mike Pence, the Indiana governor who could soon be Donald Trump’s vice president pick, opposed No Child Left Behind. (Chalkbeat)
  • School officials in Camden, N.J., are tackling formidable challenges with a combination of policy changes and hitting the streets. (The 74 Million)
  • Forget letter grades and numerical scores. California wants to grade schools with colors. (L.A. Times)
  • You knew it was coming: What “Pokemon Go” can teach us about education. (EdSurge)

reading list

Weekend Reads: ‘Love and love hard,’ a KIPP Tulsa teacher tells us all

PHOTO: Caroline Bauman
  • New Haven’s schools chief has fallen out of favor after seven years there, and now he’s looking to leave. (N.H. Independent)
  • The KIPP charter network urged its schools to act after Terence Crutcher, a KIPP dad, was killed by police in Tulsa. (Chalkbeat)
  • What that action looked like at KIPP Tulsa College Prep, where at least 10 students are related to Crutcher. (Tulsa World)
  • A teacher at the school went viral after sharing her experiences talking to students — and her advice to “love and love hard.” (Facebook)
  • Great teachers are experts at having hard conversations. Here’s their advice to America. (Chalkbeat)
  • One of Nevada’s wealthiest women is also the state’s glamorous board of education president. (Pacific Standard)
  • Two seasoned education policy wonks are leading Donald Trump’s education transition planning. (Politics K-12)
  • Why is Tennessee’s first single-sex charter school thriving? Not for the reason you might think. (The Atlantic)
  • Efforts are underway to improve black students’ experience at a diverse school where they still come out behind. (Bloomberg)

reading list

Weekend Reads: Why Texas stopped students with disabilities from getting the help they need

PHOTO: Alan Petersime
  • A story about school choice in Philadelphia didn’t mention race drew criticism from Nikole Hannah-Jones (and others). (Billy Penn)
  • What KIPP did after it realized how many graduates were dropping out of college has changed the conversation about success. (Chalkbeat)
  • Texas has systematically prevented children with disabilities from getting the help they’re legally entitled to, according to a new investigation. (Houston Chronicle)
  • An exit interview with Kaya Henderson, the chief who took D.C. schools from “dead” to cracking down on families faking addresses to get in. (Scholastic)
  • Watch this video to get up speed on the Common Core standards and why they’re still under fire. (EdWeek)
  • A coach speaks directly, and encouragingly, to a student whose teacher sees him as a problem. (Education Post)
  • What Donald Trump is really saying when he says he’d create home-school vouchers for poor kids. (Slate)
  • A new study found that the greatest determinant of police surveillance in schools is the presence of students of color. (The Atlantic)
  • Catch up on the last year — and century — in Detroit schools, one of the few places where police seem to be visible in that city. (Harpers)
  • Among the details in a lawsuit challenging the quality of education in Detroit: condoms on the floor and teachers without training. (Chalkbeat)