eva moskowitz

New York

A tour reignites a feud, and sheds light on Harlem space wars

New York

Mayoral control critics give school board literal rubber stamps

Protesters derailed the monthly city school board meeting last night, filing out during the middle of the meeting with chants of "Hey hey, ho ho, one-man-rule has got to go!" The protesters are part of the Campaign for Better Schools, a coalition of community groups that is pushing the state legislature to add checks to the mayor's control of public schools. They argue that the school board, currently known as the Panel for Educational Policy, is nothing more than a rubber stamp for the mayor's school policies. Panel members have almost always voted with the administration since Mayor Bloomberg fired three members who signaled they would oppose a third-grade promotion policy in 2005. The group began the meeting, at Stuyvesant High School in Lower Manhattan, with a rally outside the school, then filed quietly into the meeting room, nearly filling the lower level of an auditorium as they listened to a presentation about swine flu. But as Schools Chancellor Joel Klein, who chairs the PEP, tried to shift the topic of conversation to test scores, the Campaign for Better Schools protesters stood up, and one member launched into a speech encouraging panel members to "think for yourselves." "In the meantime, for those of you who cannot, we have brought you something that we hope you can use moving forward," the speaker said, referring to actual rubber stamps the campaign had made that read "PEP approved." As the protesters left the auditorium, one of them, William Hargraves, launched into an impassioned speech of his own, which starts at the beginning of the second minute of the video above. "Yo, chancellor," he said. "What did you prove? Ninety percent of your audience left. ... You'd rather be in front of nobody so that you can say what you've got to say, than to hear what the majority got to say?"
New York

On NY1, Weingarten floats making the word "tenure" optional

Teachers union president Randi Weingarten and one of her chief adversaries, charter school operator Eva Moskowitz, provided some of the conflict expected during their live television debate tonight. But by the end of the segment on NY1's "Road to City Hall," host Dominic Carter had gotten the pair to agree to visit each other's schools, and Weingarten had suggested that she's prepared to jettison the word "tenure" when it comes to negotiating with charter schools, which typically are not unionized. Moskowitz kicked off the debate with a trademark attack on the teachers union, saying that inflexible, "top-down" union contracts inhibit schools from flexibly meeting student needs. She said later in the segment that teachers are "fleeing" traditional public schools, noting that 7,000 people applied for just 52 teaching positions in the four Harlem Success charter schools that she runs. Weingarten appeared exasperated as she told Moskowitz that such a characterization of the teachers contract is outdated. "Maybe it's been a long time, in terms of you not looking at the UFT-Board of Education contract," she said. "There's a lot of flexibility in that contract these days." Weingarten repeatedly emphasized that she wasn't interested in making the conversation a debate about unions vs. charter schools. She said charter schools should be considered incubators for innovation, reiterating a statement she first made last week at an event hosted by the conservative Manhattan Institute. "Let's make them great laboratories of labor relations as well," she said. "I would love it if we could do some contracts in your schools," Weingarten said to Moskowitz. Later, Weingarten said, "Eva, listen, let's try to not continue a path of conflict. ... In your schools, let's find a way to do due process without the word tenure."
New York

Charter schools will get $30M in one-shot plan to counter freeze

PHOTO: Alan PetersimeA Queens charter school encouraged parents and students to call Governor David Paterson and Senate Majority Leader Malcolm Smith after it learned charter schools could see their funding frozen. Paterson and Smith are now sending the schools $30 million. (##http://picasaweb.google.com/teach11372/RenaissanceCharterRallyAndMarchAgainstCharterCuts#5319497282636828866##Nicholas##) Governor David Paterson and Malcolm Smith, the state Senate majority leader, are back in good favor with their long-lost charter school friends. Smith has just announced a plan to counteract a budget freeze that took the schools by surprise earlier this year, by sending the schools a one-time $30 million grant. The grant is less than the $51 million that charter schools were slated to lose after legislators axed planned funding increases in their recent budget deal. And it will expire at the end of next year, leaving supporters to wage a new fight  over funds then. But a source familiar with the plan who is a supporter of charter schools said that $30 million will be enough to help schools that had been imagining slashing after-school programs and turning down extra staff they'd already hired for next year. Smith announced the planned injection just now at a charter school lottery in Harlem, which Philissa is covering. The lottery is the annual event for the former City Council member Eva Moskowitz, who runs the Success Charter Network in Harlem. Harlem Success is expecting more than 5,000 parents at the lottery, which will determine which children are selected to attend the schools.
New York

Moskowitz asks Weingarten to retract her "hypocrite" accusation

The latest in the cue-card extravaganza: Here's a letter that the former City Council member-turned-charter school operator Eva Moskowitz just sent to teachers union president Randi Weingarten, her rival. The letter is a response to Weingarten's appearance on Fox 5's Good Day New York this morning. Weingarten told Fox 5 that City Council members commonly ask the teachers union for advice on issues. She said that Moskowitz herself asked for information when she chaired the council's education committee. "I find that people shouldn't be hypocrites," Weingarten said. "Eva used to ask us all the time when she was education chair for questions to prep the City Council about, you know, what's really going on in schools." Moskowitz writes back today in a letter to Weingarten saying that the characterization is false — and demanding a retraction: I never asked the UFT or any party to propose questions for me.  I held over a hundred days of hearings as Chairperson of the Education Committee.  I demand that you identify a single instance in which I asked the UFT for questions or used questions prepared for me by the UFT.  You will be unable to find such an example because it does not exist.  In light of that, please retract your inaccurate and defamatory statement. A rivalry between Weingarten and Moskowitz burst open in 2005 when Weingarten campaigned heavily against Moskowitz's bid for borough president of Manhattan. Moskowitz had targeted labor unions in hearings when she chaired the education committee. This week, Moskowitz testified at the same hearing that drew the controversy that a "union-political complex" is holding the city back. Here's the full letter:
New York

City Council moves to regulate city's placement of charter schools

The former chair of the City Council education committee, Eva Moskowitz, talked to the current chair, Robert Jackson, before today's hearing on charter schools. Moskowitz runs a charter school network, while Jackson said he is skeptical of charter schools. (<em>GothamSchools</em>, Flickr) City Council members today moved to regulate the process of placing charter schools in public school buildings, introducing a resolution that they said would avoid conflicts between families at neighborhood schools and new charter schools placed inside of them. Right now, Department of Education officials offer some charter schools space in public school buildings on their own, but the space-sharing arrangements are sometimes contentious. (Charter schools receive public funding, but operate outside of the DOE watch and are not guaranteed space in public school buildings.) The Council resolution would force the department to follow some kind of a regular procedure — probably involving a requirement to work with members of a neighborhood — before it could place a charter school in a public building. "Make community stakeholders part of that process," City Council Member Maria del Carmen Arroyo, of the Bronx, said. "You fail miserably at including the people that have to deal with the fallout of the decisions that you make." Council Member Jessica Lappin of Manhattan, who chairs the council's work on public land use issues, said that charter schools should be placed in the same way that new traditional public schools are placed. "I have worked very hard to bring community members, principals, and the Department of Education together so that we can resolve the issues that inevitably arise," Lappin said. Why, she asked, shouldn't charter schools be placed in the same way? Testifying before the council, Department of Education officials said they agree that they need to improve the way that they bring in new schools, but they declined to support the resolution that would force them to follow a new procedure when doing it.
New York

Harlem parents say they want their local schools shut down