Math for America

How I Teach

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New York

Cuomo announces first phase of $11 million teacher stipends

Hundreds of top-rated upstate science and math teachers will be eligible for $15,000 in annual stipends under a new mentorship program announced by Gov. Andrew Cuomo this afternoon. New York City teachers aren't eligible for the stipends, in part because they still lack an evaluation system to identify them according to a four-tiered ratings scale. But the state is relying heavily on a highly-regarded city-based mentoring organization to implement the program in selected higher education institutions. Under Cuomo's "Master Teacher Program," 250 teachers from schools located in four upstate regions — North Country, Mid-Hudson, Central New York and Western New York — will be selected to receive a total of $60,000 in extra pay over four years. In exchange, the teachers will be trained at State University of New York education colleges and tasked with mentoring new teachers in the science and math subjects. Recruiting and rewarding top teachers to work in high-demand subject areas was one of the recommendations put forth by Cuomo's Education Reform Commission last year. Cuomo also secured $11 million in the 2013-2014 state budget to develop the program, which is scheduled to expand to more districts. “As part of the state's work to transform our education system and put students first, we are committed to investing in great teachers to educate our students and create a highly-trained workforce to drive our future economy," Cuomo said in a statement. "This program will reward those teachers who work harder to make the difference and whose students perform better as a result.”
New York

Cuomo floats competitive grants to urge more learning time

The state will underwrite costs for schools that keep students in class an extra 300 hours per year, according to a top proposal floated today in Gov. Andrew Cuomo's third "State of the State" address. Extended learning time was one of several proposals Cuomo mentioned during the education section of his speech, which lasted more than an hour and covered a variety of non-education issues, including a strict ban on assault weapons, decriminalization of small amounts of marijuana, raising the minimum wage and a new plan to build casinos in upstate New York (the revenue of which will mostly go toward state school aid). The proposals were part of a "more and better" approach to education reform that Cuomo is crafting for 2013, a year after he targeted education "lobbyists" and school bureaucratic inefficiencies. Cuomo said he also wants to invest in expanding early education programs and creating schools that provide health and social services for poor communities. Cuomo is making the funds available in the form of competitive grants, which he has used in the past in an attempt to fast-track education reforms. The grants would only be eligible to districts and schools that craft plans that adhere to best practices prescribed by Cuomo. The previous grants have encountered resistance, both from union officials, the Board of Regents and State Education Commissioner John King. They all agreed that a $250 million mini-Race to the Top grant would be be better used if it were redistributed into the state's general school aid formula.
New York

At P.D. day, teachers discuss challenges of their profession

Across the city yesterday, high school teachers hunkered down for a day of extra training. Some sat in on sessions at their schools, while others scattered across the city for sessions held in the offices of educational consultants. I stopped by the Midtown offices of Math for America, a fellowship program for math and science teachers, and saw teachers working on student work to better understand why they thought the way they did. Here's what some said about some of the topics dominating the policy agenda these days (interviews edited for clarity and brevity): Bill Lamonte, Millennium High School Subject: Science Years: 10 (eight in New York City) How long will you be a teacher for? I may be a different case because I know I'll be teaching until I die. But it is hard to see colleagues that start out putting in that time and then get frustrated and end up leaving. I am challenged professionally, but some people don't want to deal with the bureaucracy of the system. The DOE is a tough place. It's very top-down. It's hard. But if you have a supportive administration and you're in a school that has ideals that you believe in, it's easier to stay because you feel you can work with people and that you can actually make a difference. Would you ever consider a school leadership position? I know I'll be teaching, but I steer clear of the administration path just because I see what happens to teachers when they become administrators. They take on another personality, in a way. Again, it's very top-down, so they have to meet certain requirements themselves. In order to do that you have to put a lot of pressure on your teachers. When you have to have a checklist – are they doing this, this, and this? – I can see how it can become a struggle to balance. Although I do find that a lot of schools struggle with having good administrators. There are a lot of weak principals out there. I've seen it first hand, especially at my old school in the Bronx. Luckily now I do feel that the administration is batter and that does make a huge difference. To feel supported in a school is really what's going to keep a teacher there.
New York

A father in higher education chastises Joel Klein on the freeze