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Study: Students who slip before they succeed still at risk later on

A chart from the report showing how students with very different high school trajectories can end up in the same place academically—at least on paper. Not all high school graduates are created equally: Some had to make up ground after falling behind along the path to graduation day. Identifying those future graduates early could be key to getting them to succeed in college later, according to a new report. The report, authored by researchers with the education nonprofit New Visions for Public Schools, tracked students in 75 New Visions-supported city schools through high school and into college. The report finds that students who graduate with a Regents diploma after years of struggling are much less likely to succeed in college than those students who have a history of good performance. Schools tend to pay special attention to students with obvious obstacles to overcome, such as a disability or status as an English language learner. But students who have a couple of bad semesters in tenth grade and then earn passing grades in their junior year don't always register as being "at risk" to their schools, the report concludes. The report advocates for schools to expand the definition of an "at-risk" student to include any student who has experienced ups and downs—which are marked and reviewed according to a metric system detailed in the study that New Visions schools will continue to use. It also argues that school districts like New York City are pushing schools in this direction by emphasizing schools' graduation rate as the main benchmark of success. "We're trying to take the conversation and say, every kid, whether high or low performing, is vulnerable but in a different way," said Susan Fairchild, one of the report's lead authors. "Our accountability structures don't necessarily support schools. We're moving in those direction, but our systems are really based on accumulation, not flow, not how kids actually come into the system."