pensions

New York

Teacher pension fund lost $9 billion last year while costs rose

In Albany this week, UFT President Michael Mulgrew floated a plan to save the city money by letting teachers retire earlier. But a new report on the health of the city's teachers pension fund suggests that Mulgrew's proposal would only compound the fund's potentially crippling budget crunch. The fund's annual report, released last week, shows that it lost 29 percent of its value, more than $9 billion, last school year, even as the portion the city is required to pay reached unprecedented heights. The mix of rising costs and declining value raises serious questions about how the city will be able to afford to pay the pensions it has promised in the future without major concessions by the teachers union. The fund, called the Teachers Retirement System (TRS), is a collection of investments paid for with a combination of taxpayer dollars and teacher salaries. Every year a chunk of it is used to pay retired teachers and principals the pensions state law says they are owed. Last year's financial crisis sunk the fund to its lowest level in more than 15 years, effectively erasing all of the gains made in the past decade's bull market, according to a database of TRS's financial reports. Over that time span, the fund's value, adjusted for inflation, has shrunk by more than $11 billion. This leaves a $15 billion gap between what the fund expects to pay out in the next 30 or so years and what it will have saved by that time, according to the TRS's preferred accounting method. Another way of calculating these "unfunded liabilities" used in the private sector puts the number even higher, at $27 billion. "It's not a crisis. It's a long-run big problem: The pension system is far more costly than it ought to be," said Charles Brecher of the Citizens Budget Commission, an independent group that advocates for changes in city and state finances.