physical education

Team USA

leveling the playing field

room to run

Get moving

Get moving

PE gap

change of course

Gym time

space debates

P.E. downgrade?

measuring up

Own it

New York

Charter school opts out of free public space in favor of a gym

Urban Dove's website features a clock that is counting down to the first day of classes at the nonprofit's new charter school. For most of this spring, Urban Dove Team Charter School’s story followed a familiar trajectory. When the Department of Education offered the charter school space in a public school building, the community erupted in opposition. Politicians stepped in, principals went to the press, and parents protested — all with the goal of keeping the charter school out. Then the city signed off on the co-location anyway, and tensions started to die down. That’s when Urban Dove’s story took an unusual turn. Despite getting free public space — a hotly sought-after commodity — Urban Dove signed a lease this month to spend some of its scarce per-pupil funding on private space. Next month, the transfer high school will open on one floor of Bedford-Stuyvesant’s Brooklyn Tabernacle Church. It was a rare move for a charter school offered a public building. Most charter schools prefer to open in buildings owned by the city to save money and time spent negotiating with landlords, according to James Merriman, director of the New York City Charter School Center. Plus, money for real estate comes from charter schools' operating budget — meaning the more they spend on space, the less they have for teachers, supplies, and programming. Urban Dove’s founder and principal each declined to share the terms of the lease. But they said undertaking the significant expense made perfect sense for the school, which will serve students who have already fallen behind before they turn 16.
New York

Pace seniors hit the gym after school's P.E. crediting oversight

Pace High School's Chinatown school building Until last week, Tejiana Lee, a senior at Pace High School, didn’t have to start her day until 10 a.m. After three years with a heavy course load, she was enjoying the late start her two consecutive free periods were giving her. But now she must arrive at the school 45 minutes before the regular day begins to log time in the weight room. Lee is one of dozens of second-semester seniors whose schedules were jolted last week when they found out the school had not required them to take the correct number of gym courses. State and city regulations require high school students to be enrolled in physical education classes for seven semesters, but Pace had scheduled them for only four semesters and still counted the requirement as complete. Simply put, "the school granted students more credit than allowed," said Marge Feinberg, a Department of Education spokeswoman. So until the recent schedule change, most seniors were not actually on track to graduate in June. Now, they are scrambling to enroll in a variety of P.E. classes – and creative alternatives – that began this week. Some, such as Lee, are enrolled in P.E. classes before and after the school day. One student, Chrystal, said she's making up one P.E. credit through her part-time job as a dance instructor and plans to earn another by joining Pace’s flag football league in March. Another senior, Michael Thompson, said he's getting credit by going to his local gym and showing up to school on Saturdays. “We’re mad, but there’s nothing we can do about it. I just have to put on my tough face,” Lee said.
New York

Comptroller: Most schools not meeting P.E. time requirements

New York

Cuts cost a gym-less school its physical education teacher, too