Priority schools

good news bad news

chalk talk

Still struggling

A new way

ESSA plan

iZone lite

Community voices

Budget unveiled

Field trip

Unleashed

survey says

primer

It's a start

Next moves

chalk talk

Hard decisions

Pilot program

Adjustments in Accountability

iZone growth

Private schools

curve ball

Heating up

Teacher Town

Ed Chief

Ground zero

Big investment

Charter conversations

Achievement School District

Game on

Priority schools

The List

ahead of schedule

Priority Schools?

New York

Exit strategy for students at closing schools hard to navigate

Edna Wilson and her granddaughter Gianee, a P.S. 64 student, protested the school's poor quality before its closure hearing in February. Wilson is among those who were disappointed with the transfer options the city presented to students in schools that it is is phasing out. (Luke Hammill) An escape route from the city's most struggling schools that Department of Education officials touted as a significant innovation is unlikely to be an option for many eligible families, parents and advocates say. When the city closes low-performing schools, new students aren't allowed to enroll and current students stay on until they graduate. The arrangement has drawn criticism from state officials, families, and advocates who say high-need students see morale and support decline as their schools diminish in size. This spring, just before finalizing plans to close 22 schools, department officials said they felt a “moral imperative” to help students who want to leave closing schools do so. They said they would mail transfer applications, including a list of possible destination schools, to all 16,000 students in the 61 schools that would be in the process of phasing out this fall. “They presented it to families as an alternative to protect their children,” said Emma Hulse, a community organizer with New Settlement who has helped South Bronx families fill out transfer applications. "But when the package actually hit people's mailboxes, we realized it’s not a meaningful alternative," she said.
New York

State names 123 city schools to improve or close by 2015

New York State's No Child Left Behind waiver has spawned a new list of struggling schools that education officials could close if they don't post dramatic improvements by 2015. That list includes many schools that were identified as struggling by the state in the past and have undergone deep reform interventions or begun phasing out, but now labels them as "priority schools." In New York City, there are 123 priority schools, nearly double the schools once identified as "persistently low achieving" because their students performed poorly on state tests and posted low graduation rates. The schools are being called priority schools because their statistics are grim, officials said. The state determined which schools would be identified as priority based on four-year graduation rates (under 60 percent) in high schools and a student growth formula from state test scores in elementary and middle schools that places the schools in the bottom 5 percent of schools statewide, per guidelines set by the federal government. The districts will have just three years to improve these data points, according to a release the State Education Department published late this afternoon, and must submit transitional plans for each priority school by October. And for the first time, State Education Commissioner John King will have the authority to require districts to close the schools that fail to make gains. Districts generally have several options for funding reforms in these schools through federal School Improvement Grant and Race to the Top Innovation Funding programs. But New York City has fewer. Because the city and the teachers union have yet to agree on a teacher evaluation plan, state officials said the city is only eligible to receive funding to implement the most stringent of interventions: school closure over a four-year period, through a process known as phase-out, or school "turnaround." But turnaround is for now off the table because the city lost a lawsuit over its plans to use the turnaround model in 24 schools earlier this summer. It is appealing the decision, but is not likely to see a resolution soon.