progress reports

New York

College readiness hits progress reports but doesn't sway scores

The biggest change to this year's high school progress reports, being released this morning, won't affect schools' scores. In a nod to the growing recognition that a high school diploma does not guarantee college success, the Department of Education is adding three "college readiness" data points to the annual reports. They will calculate the percentages of students who passed college-level exams or courses; who would not require remedial courses at CUNY colleges; and who enroll in college the fall after they graduate. Starting next year, those figures will factor in to schools' final grades, but this year the department is including them for informational purposes only. Another change to the reports does reflect the growing focus on the quality of high school work — and is factored into the results. The credit accumulation metric, which looks at how many courses each student passed, has been narrowed to focus on classes completed in the core subjects of English, math, social studies, and science. In the past, a student was counted as having appropriately accumulated credits if he passed 10 classes, regardless of what they were. Now, at least six of the classes have to be in the core subjects. One thing that won't be on the reports: credit recovery numbers. Since last year, the department has been collecting data on the number of students who receive credit through non-traditional means after failing a class. The practice is sanctioned in policy but has been accused of being abused at some high schools, where students have been awarded credit after doing only minimal work. Another change will help some schools relax.
New York

School report cards stabilize after years of unpredictability

After years of volatility, letter grades on progress reports for the city's elementary and middle schools are the most stable and accurate they've ever been, according to Department of Education officials. Queens schools had the highest grades on this year's city progress reports, which were released today, and charter schools received higher scores, on average, than schools across the city. Of the 1,219 schools to receive grades in this year's reports, 298 schools received an A, 411 received a B, 354 received a C, 79 received a D and 32 received an F. The city graded schools on a curve, so that 60 percent scored either an A or a B; 30 percent received C's; and 10 percent received D's or F's – twice as many as last year. That means new additions to the city's list of schools that it will consider closing. Schools that received a D or F, or three consecutive years of C or lower, are automatically added to the list of potential closures. Last year, 62 schools fell into that group, but this year, the total was 116. It is the fifth year that the city has issued the reports, which assess schools based heavily on students' state test scores and their improvement since last year, as well as attendance rates, and feedback from parents, students, and teachers. Schools also earn extra credit for progress made by students with disabilities and English language learners. For the first time this year, schools whose low-performing black and Latino boys made gains also got extra credit. "By acknowledging progress in schools that help struggling students, we can keep more students on track during elementary and middle school," Chancellor Dennis Walcott said in a statement. Changing standards on state tests over the past two years had thrown the DOE's progress reports into a cycle of unpredictability. Inflated test scores in 2009 resulted in just two schools receiving F's, while 84 percent earned A's. Last year, after state tests became harder to pass, almost 70 percent of schools saw their grades drop and a third of schools saw their grades swing – mostly downward – by two or more letters.
New York

DOE priorities seen in fresh tweaks to progress report formula

In an education department that's driven by data, what gets measured is a clear expression of values. So this year's elementary and middle school progress reports signal that the city is serious about integrating disabled students into regular classes, helping minority boys, and quickly getting immigrant students learning in English. The broad contours of what we'll see later today when the Department of Education releases the newest progress reports, based on the last school year, have been clear for months. Back in the spring, the DOE told principals that it would not insulate schools against steep score drops as it did last year, so we know that more schools will get failing grades that put them at risk of closure. In fact, the department set a fixed distribution of scores: 25 percent of schools will get As, 35 percent Bs, 30 percent Cs, 7 percent Ds, and 3 percent Fs. Last year, just 5 percent of schools were awarded D or F grades. We also know each school's state test scores, announced last month. While high or low average scores don't always equate to high or low progress report grades, because the reports are based mostly on the test scores, they often do. (The department is also guaranteeing that schools with test scores in the top third citywide get no lower than a C; last year, only schools in the top quarter got that promise.) Also, because fewer schools registered large test score gains or losses this year, progress report grades are likely to be relatively stable. That means that the biggest changes could come as the result of the department's annual tinkering with the reports' formula.
New York

As Walcott watches, AP stats students scrutinize school metrics

Schools Chancellor Dennis Walcott listens to a student presentation on their school's progress report. Statistics students at a Brooklyn high school took an unusually high-profile final exam today: They presented an analysis of the city's school report cards to an audience that included their principal and Schools Chancellor Dennis Walcott. Their teacher, Eleanor Terry, had invited the Chancellor via email, hoping to put together an official audience for her Advanced Placement statistics students at the High School for Telecommunication Arts and Technology. The school earned an A on its most recent progress report. But that didn't stop students — who wore buttons depicting their statistics class mascot, the "normalcurvasaurus" — from scrutinizing the way their school was graded. They examined technical issues including bias in survey questions, the way students are broken into deciles by their eighth-grade test scores, and how different scores were weighted to come up with their school’s final grade. The students peppered their presentations with recommendations for Walcott, ranging from offering the student surveys online to factoring a school’s size into its grading. Walcott spent more than an hour scribbling notes during the presentations. When students described difficult experiences in freshman physics classes and adjusting to high school, which they said could affect the student progress section of the report, Walcott asked, “Should we be doing something different freshman year?” “The kids were unbelievably impressed that he said he would come. And I can’t say my reaction was any different,” Principal Phil Weinberg said.
New York

More D's and F's likely mean additions to closure watch-list

New York

City to release progress reports with new formula, lower grades

Tomorrow, when the city releases its progress reports for elementary and middle schools, parents will begin the annual rite of deciphering their schools' report cards. But this year the tradition will be complicated by a new formula and, for many schools, lower grades. The city is trying to accomplish several goals at once: It is hoping to improve the methods it uses to measure student progress and reduce the wild fluctuation and inflation of grades that has marked past years' progress reports. At the same time, city officials hope to convince parents, teachers and principals that the grades are meaningful, especially in light of this year's sharp drop in test scores across the city. Last year, the city gave 84 percent of elementary and middle schools A’s, while 13 percent received a B, and 2 percent received a C. Just five schools were given D’s, and two were given F’s. Those grades were much higher than the year before, when 38 percent of schools were given an A. In 2007, when the reports were first issued, 23 percent received that rating. For this year's progress reports, the city is making several big changes to how the grades are calculated. First, it is modifying how the city calculates students' progress. In the past, a significant percentage of a school's grade  — 85 percent for elementary and middle schools — was based on student performance on state math and reading scores. So when test scores went up throughout the city in 2009 (reflecting a statewide trend), the grades soared on progress reports. This year the city is doing something different. It is comparing the progress of each student to other students who began the school year performing at the same level.
New York

College-readiness reports useful, but not complete, city says