mea culpa

Denver Public Schools owns up to not thoroughly vetting school board appointee

Denver Public Schools Susana Cordova (Photo By John Leyba/The Denver Post).

Denver Public Schools Acting Superintendent Susana Cordova apologized Friday for the failure of her staff to thoroughly vet applicants for a vacant school board seat before the board appointed parent activist MiDian Holmes last week.

“We definitely knew the board wanted us to do background checks on all the applicants,” Cordova said in an interview. “That was really clear. We did do background checks. We did not do thorough background checks. That’s a problem. That’s why we are where we are.”

Holmes was appointed April 12 but announced two days later she wouldn’t accept the position after it came to light she hadn’t been truthful about the circumstances of a 2006 misdemeanor child abuse conviction.

She told the district it stemmed from the police being called after her 2-year-old daughter wandered out of their apartment. But records obtained by Chalkbeat after Holmes was appointed revealed it was actually related to police finding her three young children home alone.

When board members voted to appoint her, they had only her version of events.

Board president Anne Rowe said Friday that it was “unfortunate that despite the board’s request to do the appropriate level of background checks, it did not happen and the board was not aware of this until after we voted.”

Holmes — a school reform advocate, DPS alumna and parent of three students — was chosen from an initial field of 22 applicants to represent northeast Denver on the seven-member board after the previous representative, Landri Taylor, resigned in February.

On March 15, the district began conducting background checks on the finalists for the position, Cordova said. DPS safety and security staff, the district’s general counsel and members of the chief of staff’s office were involved in doing the checks, she said.

By March 25, the district had arrest records, district spokeswoman Nancy Mitchell said. But that information was not immediately shared with board members, she said. Instead, Mitchell said, the board learned about Holmes’s conviction sometime between March 25 and when they appointed her on April 12. She did not provide a specific date.

The district has yet to release documents that might shed light on the sequence of events.

With the deadline passed for the board to appoint a new member, the task now falls to Rowe.

Cordova said the district is in the process of more thoroughly checking into the backgrounds of the other finalists. That should be completed Monday, she said.

The district did not have a documented process for vetting candidates to fill a board vacancy because the situation happens infrequently, Cordova said.

But now, she said, the district is “thoroughly and thoughtfully reviewing what happened to make sure it does not happen again.” In the future, she said the district will ask candidates to submit to a more rigorous fingerprint background check. If anything comes up, Cordova said, “we will review the full case file, including the disposition and details.”

Vision quest

Colorado lawmakers want to reimagine the state’s schools. Here’s how.

PHOTO: Nicholas Garcia
Students at Merino Elementary School work during class.

What should Colorado schools look like in 2030, and how should the state pay for them?

Those are two big questions a bipartisan coalition of state lawmakers hope to answer in the next several years.

State Reps. Millie Hamner and Bob Rankin, two of the state’s most influential lawmakers on education policy, are asking their colleagues this spring to approve a bill that would create a legislative process for rethinking the state’s entire public education system.

“Right now, there’s dissatisfaction with our system,” said Rankin, a Carbondale Republican and member of the state’s budget committee. “We’re sort of average. We’re average in the U.S. We’re average in the world. That’s not good enough for Colorado.”

The bill’s sponsors have two outcomes in mind: Create a vision for improving and modernizing Colorado schools and change the way the state pays for them. The plan, they think, could create enough support to convince voters to send more money to schools as needed.

“We realize it’s time to have a conversation with the state of Colorado around what is it that they want for their kids, how can we achieve that and how can we fund it,” said Hamner, a Frisco Democrat and vice-chair of the state’s budget committee, noting two recent failed attempts at the ballot to raise statewide taxes for schools.

The discussion over the future of Colorado’s schools comes as states are being handed more control over education policy. The nation’s new education law, the Every Student Succeeds Act, has fewer requirements than previous iterations of the federal law.

And soon, Colorado will no longer be bound by agreements it made with the Obama administration. The state may re-evaluate and perhaps repeal some of the policies it enacted during the last decade in an effort to win federal money.

“We’ve all been working hard, but I’m not convinced we’ve been working toward the same direction — the right direction,” Hamner said.

House Bill 1287 would create a series of committees to craft a vision and strategic plan for the state’s schools.

Already, it is being met with caution by some district-level school board members who hold dear their constitutionally protected local control.

“I can see the noble desire to invest in a vision and strategic plan. But many school districts have already done this locally,” said Doug Lidiak, a member of the Greeley school board. “I worry the outcome is more education bills coming from our state legislature.”

The idea faces other challenges: educators who feel taxed by a slew of mandates and are wary of change; school leaders already dealing with with tightening school budgets; and growing inequalities between schools on the Front Range and in the more rural parts of the state.

“Whatever comes out of this process needs to take into consideration the various differences of districts in size and geography,” said Kerrie Dallman, president of the Colorado Education Association, the state’s largest teachers union.

Some education lobbyists at the Capitol have also voiced concern that the process laid out in the bill is too bureaucratic and could take too long to address urgent needs.

The bill would create a series of committees.

The first legislative steering committee would be made up of a dozen state lawmakers, including the chairs of the House and Senate education committees and two members of the Joint Budget Committee.

A second executive advisory board would be made up of the state education commissioner, two members of the State Board of Education, representatives from the early childhood leadership commission and higher education department. The governor would also have a representative on the advisory board.

The third committee would be made up of teachers, parents, school board members, education policy advocates, representatives of the business community and others. These individuals would be appointed by the legislative steering committee.

The work would be done in four stages.

In the first phase, the committees would take stock of Colorado’s current education landscape and create a process to solicit input on what the state’s schools should look like. The second phase would collect that input. The vision and plan would be drafted in the third phase. And lawmakers would consider any legislation necessary to make the vision and plan a reality in the fourth phase.

The bill also requires the committees to meet periodically after the vision and plan are adopted to monitor how the plan is being carried out across the state.

Rankin, the House Republican, said Colorado’s education system could benefit from short-term fixes, but that it was important to take the long view, too.

“If you fight a lot of tactical battles, it ought to fit into your overall strategy,” he said. “We’re trying to build something the public can buy in to.”

Politics & Policy

Indiana ranked no. 1 for charter-friendly environment by national advocacy group

PHOTO: Alan Petersime

A national group that pushes for charter schools to operate freely says Indiana is doing almost everything right.

But the group, the National Alliance for Public Charter Schools, dinged Indy’s lack of regulation for online charter schools in its newest report ranking states on charter school regulation. A recent Chalkbeat series documented the persistently low test scores at the schools — which educate more than 11,442 students.

The nonprofit National Alliance for Public Charter Schools pushes for greater funding and flexibility for charter schools across the nation.

Its report highlights Indiana because the state does not have cap on the number of charter schools that can open. Multiple organizations also have the authority to authorize schools (including private universities and state organizations). And Indiana charter schools have significant autonomy from the strictures of district unions and many of the state regulations that cover traditional districts. But they can be closed for persistently low test scores.

Indiana has a large ecosystem of charter schools that serve more than 43,000 students — exceeding any district in the state. It’s one piece of a statewide embrace of school choice that features many of the programs U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos and President Trump support — including one of the largest voucher programs in the nation, open enrollment across district boundaries, and district-run choice programs.