cracking the code

How Hillary Clinton wants to make computer science courses available to every kid in America

PHOTO: Denver Post
Secretary Hillary Clinton visited Galvanize in Denver.

During a campaign swing Tuesday through Denver, presumptive Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton rolled out a technology and innovation platform that includes greater investments in Science, Technology, Engineering and Math, or STEM, education.

In a visit to the Galvanize tech training and co-working space, Clinton stressed a commitment to ensuring that “every student in America — no matter what ZIP code that student lives in — gets the chance to learn computer science before they graduate high school.”

Here are a few K-12 specifics from Clinton’s Initiative on Technology and Innovation, which you can read in full here.

  • Clinton proposes building on the Obama administration’s “Computer Science Education for All” initiative, doubling the investment in the government’s $120 million Investing in Innovation (i3) program, including a 50 percent set-aside for computer science education. The idea is to support efforts to scale successful instruction and lesson programs.
  • Another initiative would seek to expand the pool of computer science teachers through recruiting new teachers and giving more training to existing ones, with the goal of creating an additional 50,000 teachers in the field over the next decade. To pay for it, her administration would commit federal financial aid, assistant to professional development programs and support for private-public partnerships.
  • The Clinton Education Department would provide grants to support states, cities and charter schools on a number of initiatives. Among those mentioned were developing innovative schools, redesigning high schools to focus more on STEM, building higher education and private sector partnerships, and supporting so-called “makerspaces.” Denver’s DSST charter school network, in the midst of a significant expansion, gets a shoutout in the Clinton plan as a model of innovation.

Of course, proposals are just that and often run into political and financial headwinds. As Education Week noted, it’s unclear whether expanding the i3 grant program — now overhauled and called Education Innovation and Research grants under the nation’s new education law, the Every Student Succeeds Act — will find favor with Congress.

Making computer science courses available to all is an ambitious goal.

Though nine in 10 parents want their children to learn computer science, just one in four schools teach it, according to Code.org, a nonprofit advocating for expanding access to computer science, especially for young women and minority students. (The organization has worked with Denver Public Schools and the Douglas County School District).

New York City is working on a plan to eventually give all students access to computer science education. Earlier this month, officials there announced an expansion of the program to elementary schools.

In Colorado, a number of efforts are underway to promote increased STEM and computer science opportunities.

The Longmont-based St. Vrain Valley District is considered a leader in STEM education. The district has won both an i3 grant and $16.6 million in Race to the Top money for initiatives primarily serving low-income students of color.

The district has focused significant effort on Skyline High School — where it established a STEM academy — and its feeder schools. Skyline is home to one of the state’s first Pathways to Technology and Early College (P-TECH) schools, which was made possible by a 2015 state law and involves a partnership with IBM and Front Range Community College.

Students graduate with both a high school diploma and an industry-recognized associate degree, gaining job skills along the way.

“We really felt like we could break the cycle of poverty, and also allow students to have a very focused career path,” said Patty Quinones, the district’s assistant superintendent of innovation.

Most Colorado students don’t get those kind of opportunities. And racial and economic disparities are jarring.

Consider one yardstick — Advanced Placement courses and exams in computer science, one piece of STEM:

  • Just 661 Colorado high school students took the Advanced Placement computer science exam in 2014-15. Only 57 were Hispanic and only 18 were black. More than 80 percent of the students who took the exam were boys.
  • Just 55 schools — or 15 percent of Colorado schools with AP programs — offered the AP Computer Science course in 2014-15.

One legislative effort to advance computer science opportunities in Colorado fell short this year. House Bill 1291 would have added technology skills to the state’s existing content standards and provided grants for educators seeking additional training in computer science, among other things. The bill died in a Senate committee in the session’s waning days.

Scott Laband, president of Colorado Succeeds, an education-focused business group that backed the legislation, said a similar effort is likely to return next year.

Laband said efforts to bolster STEM and computer science ought to create multiple pathways for students, recognize the value of internships and apprenticeships, and inspire students to envision bright futures.

“We always talk about, ‘You cannot be what you cannot see,'” he said.

rules and regs

New York adds some flexibility to its free college scholarship rules. Will it be enough for more students to benefit?

PHOTO: Office of Governor Andrew M. Cuomo
Governor Andrew Cuomo delivered his 2017 regional State of the State address at the University at Albany.

New York is offering more wiggle room in a controversial “Excelsior” scholarship requirement that students stay in-state after graduating, according to new regulations released Thursday afternoon.

Members of the military, for example, will be excused from the rule, as will those who can prove an “extreme hardship.”

Overall, however, the plan’s rules remain strict. Students are required to enroll full-time and to finish their degrees on time to be eligible for the scholarship — significantly limiting the number who will ultimately qualify.

“It’s a high bar for a low-income student,” said Sara Goldrick-Rab, a leading expert on college affordability and a professor at Temple University. “It’s going to be the main reason why students lose the scholarship.”

The scholarship covers free college tuition at any state college or university for students whose families earn less than $125,000 per year. But it comes with a major catch: Students who receive Excelsior funding must live and work in New York state for the same number of years after graduation as they receive the scholarship. If they fail to do so, their scholarships will be converted to loans, which the new regulations specify have 10-year terms and are interest-free.

The new regulations allow for some flexibility:

  • The loan can now be prorated. So if a student benefits from Excelsior for four years but moves out of state two years after graduation, the student would only owe two years of payments.
  • Those who lose the scholarship but remain in a state school, or complete a residency in-state, will have that time count toward paying off their award.
  • Members of the military get a reprieve: They will be counted as living and working in-state, regardless of where the person is stationed or deployed.
  • In cases of “extreme hardship,” students can apply for a waiver of the residency and work requirements. The regulations cite “disability” and “labor market conditions” as some examples of a hardship. A state spokeswoman said other situations that “may require that a student work to help meet the financial needs of their family” would qualify as a hardship, such as a death or the loss of a job by a parent.
  • Students who leave the state for graduate school or a residency can defer repaying their award. They would have to return to New York afterwards to avoid having the scholarship convert to a loan.

Some of law’s other requirements were also softened. The law requires students to enroll full-time and take average of 30 credits a year — even though many SUNY and CUNY students do not graduate on time. The new regulations would allow students to apply credits earned in high school toward the 30-credit completion requirement, and stipulates that students who are disabled do not have to enroll full-time to qualify.

early running

Denver school board race opens up as Rosemary Rodriguez announces she won’t seek re-election

PHOTO: Nicholas Garcia
Board member Rosemary Rodriguez speaks at Abraham Lincoln High (Chalkbeat file)

Denver school board member Rosemary Rodriguez said Wednesday that she is not running for re-election, putting her southwest Denver seat up for grabs in what will likely be a contentious school board campaign this fall with control of the board at stake.

Rodriguez told Chalkbeat she is retiring from her job as senior advisor to Democratic U.S. Senator Michael Bennet and plans to sell her home and buy a smaller one that belonged to her grandparents.

That home is not in her school board district, District 2, but in the district represented by board member Lisa Flores. With the exception of at-large members, Denver school board members must live in the districts they represent.

“If it weren’t the case, I would still be running,” Rodriguez said.

During her four-year tenure, Rodriguez worked with community groups and others to spotlight student achievement in southwest Denver, leading to new schools and better transportation.

Former Denver Public Schools teacher and Denver native Angela Cobian announced Wednesday that she is running for the seat. Rodriguez has endorsed Cobian, a political newcomer who works for the nonprofit Leadership for Educational Equity, which helps Teach for America members and alumni get involved in politics and advocacy.

All seven current board members support Denver’s nationally known brand of education reform, which includes a “portfolio” of traditional district-run, charter, magnet and innovation schools.

With four of the the board’s seats up for grabs this November, the campaign presents an opportunity for opponents of those reforms to again try to get a voice on the board.

The field is still very much taking shape. The most competitive race so far involves District 4 in northeast Denver. Incumbent Rachele Espiritu, who was appointed to the seat last year, announced her campaign earlier this month. The board chose Espiritu after its initial pick, MiDian Holmes, withdrew after a child abuse case came to light and she was not forthcoming with all the details.

Also filing paperwork to run in District 4 is Jennifer Bacon, who was a finalist in the process that led to the board picking Espiritu. Auontai “Tay” Anderson, the student body president of Manual High School, declared his candidacy for the northeast Denver seat in April.

Incumbents Mike Johnson and Barbara O’Brien have not yet filed election paperwork with the state. Two candidates have declared for O’Brien’s at-large seat: Julie Banuelos and Jo Ann Fujioka.