ratings and consequences

Denver Public Schools set to strip nearly 50 teachers of tenure protections after poor evaluations

PHOTO: Denver Post
A teacher mentor works with another teacher during an inservice day at Valley View K-8 in 2015.

This story has been updated to reflect numbers from Douglas County.

Compared with other large Colorado school districts, Denver Public Schools has a higher proportion of teachers set to lose tenure under a sweeping educator effectiveness law passed six years ago.

Forty-seven Denver teachers are poised to lose non-probationary status — or tenure — after two consecutive years of being rated ineffective at their jobs, according to district officials. Those teachers represent about 2 percent of the total number of non-probationary teachers in DPS, the state’s largest school district.

A survey by Chalkbeat also found: In Douglas County, 24 non-probationary teachers are set to lose their status, which is slightly more than 1 percent of the district’s total number of tenured teachers. In Aurora, 12 teachers are set to lose their status, which is less than 1 percent of the non-probationary teachers in that district.

In the Cherry Creek School District, only one teacher is facing the same fate. And in Jefferson County, the state’s second largest district, no teachers will lose non-probationary status due to poor ratings.

Colorado’s educator effectiveness law, still widely referred to as Senate Bill 191, requires several things:

— That all teachers be evaluated every year. In the past, only non-tenured teachers were evaluated every year. Tenured teachers had to be evaluated every three years.

— That at least 50 percent of a teacher’s evaluation be based on student academic growth, which was not the case before Senate Bill 191.

— That probationary teachers — who are most often brand-new teachers — must have three consecutive years of effective ratings to gain non-probationary status. Before the law, teachers earned non-probationary status after three years of employment.

— That non-probationary teachers who receive two consecutive years of ineffective ratings return to probationary status, a consequence that didn’t exist before Senate Bill 191. Those teachers don’t automatically lose their jobs, only their tenure.

Because of the timeline for the rollout of the law, that consequence is just going into effect now based on teacher ratings from the 2014-15 and 2015-16 school years.

Job security is the biggest difference between probationary and non-probationary status. Probationary teachers are hired on one-year contracts. A district can get rid of a probationary teacher at the end of that contract for any reason allowed by law.

Non-probationary teachers can only be fired if a district can prove one of several grounds, such as that a teacher was insubordinate or immoral. Those teachers can appeal a dismissal all the way up to the state Supreme Court, which can take many months.

Non-probationary teachers can also appeal a rating of ineffectiveness. Appeals processes are ongoing in several districts and could affect the final numbers of teachers who lose non-probationary status.

Because this is the first year teachers can lose that status, district officials said it’s difficult to know why the numbers differ from district to district.

Sarah Almy, the executive director of talent management for DPS, said Denver’s higher proportion of teachers set to lose tenure doesn’t mean its staff isn’t up to snuff.

“I don’t think this reflects that Denver has fewer effective teachers or that our teachers and what they’re doing to advance student learning is any less powerful or effective,” she said.

While many districts use a state-developed model teacher evaluation system created in response to Senate Bill 191, Denver uses a system of its own design.

Almy said the goal of the system — called Leading Effective Academic Practice, or LEAP — is not to be punitive but to help teachers improve.

“And a really important part of that is giving honest feedback to teachers, in both what they’re doing really well and what they need to grow and develop in,” she said.

Colorado’s law is part of a bigger national trend spurred in part by the federal Race to the Top program, which offered millions of dollars in grants to states that put in place certain policies, including more stringent teacher evaluations. Most states now require student academic growth to be part of those evaluations, according to the National Council on Teacher Quality.

By the council’s count, tenured teachers in five other states — including Indiana and Tennessee — lose their status if they’re rated ineffective. In Michigan, teachers who are rated that way for three consecutive years are dismissed, according to the council.

But council president Kate Walsh said many states still aren’t taking teacher evaluations seriously. Previous evaluation systems were criticized for being binary and lax, she said: Teachers were rated satisfactory or unsatisfactory, and very few ended up in the latter category. Taking student test scores into account was meant to inject objectivity and rigor into the process.

However, Walsh said, “many of the first rollouts of these new evaluation systems have not been impressive in terms of distinguishing between teacher talent. Everyone is still getting great marks.” She added, “If I were a superintendent and I didn’t see a fairly good distribution curve within my district, I’d be suspicious about what was going on.”

In Denver, teachers can earn one of four ratings: distinguished, effective, approaching and not meeting. In 2015-16, 29 percent of non-probationary teachers earned distinguished, 65 percent earned effective, 6 percent earned approaching and 0.1 percent earned not meeting.

Teachers in the bottom two categories were eligible to lose tenure if it was the second year in a row they’d been rated either approaching or not meeting.

DPS did not provide a list of the schools at which the 47 teachers set to lose tenure taught. But the district did provide some information about the teachers and their students:

— Twenty-eight of the 47 teachers set to lose tenure — or 60 percent — have more than 15 years of experience. Ten of those teachers — 21 percent — have 20 years or more of experience.

Overall, about 33 percent of non-probationary DPS teachers have more than 15 years experience, and about 14 percent have more than twenty years of experience.

— The majority of the 47 teachers — 26 of them — are white. Another 14 are Latino, four are African-American, two are multi-racial and one is Asian.

About three-quarters of all DPS teachers — probationary and non-probationary — are white.

— Thirty-one of the 47 teachers set to lose tenure — or 66 percent — teach in “green” or “blue” schools, the two highest ratings on Denver’s color-coded School Performance Framework. Only three — or 6 percent — teach in “red” schools, the lowest rating.

About 60 percent of all DPS schools are “green” or “blue,” while 14 percent are “red.”

— Thirty-eight of the 47 teachers — or 81 percent — teach at schools where more than half of the students qualify for federally subsidized lunches, an indicator of poverty.

That’s the case at about 79 percent of all DPS schools.

Pam Shamburg, executive director of the Denver Classroom Teachers Association, said the union has long been concerned about this provision of Senate Bill 191 because teachers who are demoted to probationary status lose their due process rights.

She’s also worried it will lead to higher teacher turnover. Ten of the 47 DPS teachers set to lose non-probationary status have submitted notices of resignation or retirement, officials said, though nine of them did so before learning they would lose tenure.

“This happening to 47 teachers has a much bigger impact,” Shamburg said. “There will be hundreds of teachers who know about this. They’ll say if they can do that to (that teacher), they can do that to me.”

Team Memphis

How do you get teacher candidates to fall in love with Memphis? Shelby County Schools is taking them to a Grizzlies game.

PHOTO: Nikki Boertman/The Commercial Appeal
Memphis Grizzlies fans raise their growl towels during an NBA game at the FedEx Forum on April 25, 2013.

Home to one of the nation’s 25 largest school districts, Memphis has stepped up efforts in recent years to attract talented new teachers to a fast-changing education landscape, and now is including the city’s popular NBA basketball team as part of its playbook.

Shelby County Schools will kick off its hiring season this weekend by treating teacher candidates to dinner and a free game between the Memphis Grizzlies and Dallas Mavericks on Friday night at FedEx Forum.

A networking event will follow on Saturday at the Halloran Centre for Performing Arts & Education, a new downtown venue operated by the Orpheum Theatre to put arts and education center stage.

The activities are part of a first-ever “preview weekend” to fill openings for next school year in Tennessee’s largest district. Shelby County Schools typically hires between 600 to 800 teachers each year and is especially in need of special education and math teachers, said district spokeswoman Kristin Tallent.

Historically, the district has simply held recruitment fairs,” Tallent said Monday. “Through the weekend events, the district is hoping to expose potential teachers to our school district and some of the best that Memphis has to offer, which includes the Memphis Grizzlies.”

Teacher recruitment, development and retention has been a centerpiece of school reform efforts in Memphis since 2009 when the district won a seven-year, $90 million Gates Foundation grant that came to a close this school year. That grant, in partnership with the local nonprofit SchoolSeed, is helping to fund this weekend’s recruitment event. (To learn more about the influence of the Gates Foundation on Memphis public schools, read our special report).

The preview weekend comes as Superintendent Dorsey Hopson has proposed a budget without a shortfall or layoffs for the first time in years. The spending plan also includes $10.7 million for teacher raises to address inequities in the pay structure and shift to performance-based pay.

The district is asking teacher candidates to RSVP by Friday.

Parent-to-Para

How the Adams 14 school district is empowering parents to join the classroom

PHOTO: Yesenia Robles
A parent volunteer works with two kindergarteners on reading as part of a pilot program at Dupont Elementary School that is training parents to become paraprofessionals.

Raeann Javier would like to know what she can do to help her second-grader read better. Sometimes, sitting with her daughter, the best she could offer was, “You know how to do this.”

Javier, a single mother, also would love to land another job to earn more for her family.

A pilot program launched by Adams 14 School District in Commerce City may help her with both.

The school district is trying to build more knowledgeable, active parents through classes and volunteer time working with young students struggling to read. For those who are interested, the program also provides parents a path to become paraprofessionals, or teacher’s aides.

The initiative is one way the nearly 8,000-student suburban district — facing state intervention this year after years of poor academic performance — is trying to turn things around.

District surveys found parents were looking for ways to become more supportive.

Javier, one of 17 mothers in the program, said she already feels like she has become a more patient parent less than a month in. She also is interested in becoming a paraprofessional to supplement the income she earns as an at-home nurse.

“It’s a little bit tough. I make it work,” Javier said. “But this would really, really help.”

Other parents taking part in the pilot program already were volunteers at their kids’ schools.

“They usually just did the normal things like helping with copying or sorting papers,” said Jesse Martinez, Adams 14’s director for family and community engagement. “But we really wanted to change that dynamic. We wanted to pull in our parents to tap their potential and bring them in to support their children.”

One of the parent volunteers, Susana Torres, was an elementary school teacher for 10 years before coming to the United States. Now with three children in district schools, Torres jumped at the opportunity to get back into a classroom.

“This is my thing,” Torres said. “I love the program.”

Torres also helps other Spanish-speaking moms who are part of the program. She said that even though they don’t have the teaching background she does, the program has made it easy for all of them to learn to help kids. “All you need is a passion to make change,” she said.

Pat Almeida, the principal of Dupont Elementary, where the program is being piloted, said the goal is also to help more students become proficient in reading before third grade — especially those who are not far behind but just need a boost to get to grade level.

“We’re able to give them more repetition so they can apply that to their reading,” Almeida said. “If they’re able to have more repetition, their progress is going to be accelerated.”

Dupont Elementary is among the Adams 14 schools that is struggling, though the school isn’t yet facing sanctions like the district as a whole is this year.

District officials have been working on setting up reforms all year to present to the state as a suggestion for their corrective action, including getting help from an outside company for developing curriculum and testing. Increasing parental engagement through this and other new efforts, like having teachers visit families at home, are part of the work to improve the district.

The parent-to-para program is being funded with money from the Denver-based Rose Community Foundation (Rose also supports Chalkbeat) and Climb Higher Colorado, a coalition of advocacy groups that support strong academic standards and tests.

At Dupont, while the parent volunteers work with almost 75 students that they pull out of class for about an hour, teachers can spend the time in class working with students who need the most help.

An instructional coach supervises the moms to work with groups of two to six students and helps them plan lessons each day for kids.

During one lesson this week, parents were helping kindergarteners learn how to differentiate between capital and lowercase letters and how to sound out words. Some students were still having trouble identifying letters, while one boy was writing words so quickly he was standing up, moving around and at one point fell.

The volunteers said it’s rewarding to see the kids catching on.

“Knowing that just a little bit of our time can help them is a good feeling,” said volunteer Adelaida Guerrero. “It’s an excellent opportunity for them and for us.”

For Maria Rodriguez, the program has unexpectedly given her another benefit — bringing her closer to her teenage daughters. She said she joined the program because when a bilingual program for her two oldest daughters was removed seven years ago, she had stopped being able to help them on their school work.

When Rodriguez heard about the program, she thought she could prepare to help her younger children, a second and third grader, before they too required more help than she could offer.

“It’s brilliant,”Rodriguez said. “I’ve been helping them work on their vowels.”

Within the last week, the two older girls came to Rodriguez complaining that she hadn’t ever worked to help them in the same way, and asking to join in during the at-home lessons. Over time, the girls had kept their ability to speak Spanish, but never learned how to write it. Now they were asking to learn alongside their younger siblings.

“They have that apathy of adolescence that makes them not always want to get close to us as parents,” Rodriguez said, tearing up as she recalled the moment. “I honestly felt really good.”